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TIDBITS OF INFO- UTAH

Mile-Long Tunnel for Motor Traffic in Utah

THE National Park Service, of the US Department of the Interior, announces that reports from the field are to the effect that the spectacular mile-long tunnel, which is being driven through the sandstone walls of Zion Canyon, in Utah, is nearing completion. The contractors are advancing this tunnel at the rate of 37 ft. per day. It is now about 80 per cent completed and is expected to be finished in another month. The tunnel is a part of the Zion-Mount Carmel Highway which the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads is engaged in building for the National Park Service.

August 4, 1928— Engineering and Mining Journal
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ZION TUNNEL PROJECT TMJ 3 30 1929

for MARCH 30, 1929 Mining Journal


Tunneling for Zion Park Scenic Highway
By T. J. WELCKER, Dooly Block, Salt Lake City. Methods used and equipment employed in this hugh tunnel project hold much of interest to
mining and civil engineers.

During the past two or three years, enterprising tourists have brought back enthusiastic accounts of the wonderfully picturesque country found in Southwestern Utah, in Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon, and Cedar Breaks; of the natural beauty of the Kaibab National Forest, and of the grandeur of the trip which terminates on the north rim of the Grand Canyon of Arizona.

The glowing sandstone statuary of the region has been pictured in all the brilliance of its remarkable coloring by auto-chrome photography, and an increasing number of tourists visit this wild, new country, every season. It is 850 miles southwest of Salt Lake City on the Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad, which one leaves at Lund, taking a branch line to Cedar City.
Much has already been done in opening automobile highways, as shown by the accompanying section of a Utah road map. At the present time, a large program of improvement is under way to shorten distances between strategic points, and to open up new vistas and regions of wilderness beauty.

With Cedar City as the base, the three parks are all easily reached by good roads, but in each case the route must be retraced via Cedar City. To shorten the distance to the Grand Canyon and to cut the necessary travel between parks to a minimum, it was decided to make a loop of the road system. By constructing a cutoff from Springdale to Mt. Carmel, approximately 26 miles in length, the distance to Bryce Canyon is reduced from 159 miles, as at present, to 88 miles, while the distance to Cedar Breaks, now 140 miles by road, will be cut down to 70. The distance to the Grand Canyon will be reduced from 142 miles by road to just over 100 miles.

This new road runs through exceedingly rugged, broken country, and includes approximately two miles of tunneling. The first tunnel, described in this article, is a little over one mile in length, and is included in the first and second sections now being built. The balance of the tunneling comes in shorter lengths, in the third section, which will not be started until the present two are completed. Besides tunneling through vertical canyon walls, and building a number of bridges, it was necessary to make very heavy fills and cuts the entire distance, with proper provisions for drainage. The United States Government Bureau of Public Roads, Mr. French, district chief, has the first three sections, which are not quite eight miles in length, while the State of Utah will build the remainder, outside the limits of the National Park.

At the government end of the road, the Nevada Contracting Co. of Fallon, Nevada, is handling the job. Mr. E. S. Berney is president and general manager at Fallon, while Stanley Bray is superintendent, and Richard Scott is in direct charge of the tunnel work. The contract price of the job is $604,000.

Work was started more than a year ago. Section No. 1 of the job consisted of building a road up the practically vertical walls of the canyon, involving a climb of 3,000 feet in approximately 8 miles. The road winds back and forth up the slope, making seven different switchbacks in its course to the base of the perpendicular cliff, where the tunnel through the cliff begins. The second section includes the tunnel proper, which is about 5,600 feet in length.

Details of Approach Work
Some idea of the magnitude of the approach road may be gained when it is known that more than 460,000 cubic yards of overhaul alone were required. For the rock drilling required on the approach work, a Sullivan 810-ft. vibration-less type compressor was employed, together with two other portables. Many immense loose boulders were encountered, which had to be drilled, also in some places solid rock had to be removed. Excavation was handled with three gasoline shovels. The sandstone disintegrates into a powdery sand, making haulage difficult. A number of different types of motor trucks were employed, those with pneumatic tires giving the best results in the sandy section.

Owing to the difficulties of haulage up the terrific grade, it was necessary to adopt some other method of getting the heavy machinery for tunneling up to the location selected for the tunnel portal. An aerial cableway one thousand feet in length was resorted to, giving a 700-ft. rise in this distance. A 40-ft. tower was erected at the top of the slope under the base of the cliff to land the machinery properly. Drills, transformers, compressors, shovels, motors, etc., were handled by this means.

Tunnel Started from Side Galleries
Conditions at the site selected for the tunnel portal made it impossible to begin drilling at this point. To overcome this difficulty, galleries were opened on the tunnel grade line, along the face of the cliff. In some cases scaffolding was erected at the top of the talus slope at the base of the cliff; in other cases working platforms were suspended (hung) from the summit of the cliff itself. The scaffolds varied in height from 80 to 90 feet. The first gallery heading or opening is shown in the illustration on page 10. When the first gallery reached the tunnel line, a heading was turned, and driven to the tunnel portal.

The headings were driven on the grade line of the tunnel, 5 x 10 feet in size, starting in each direction from the galleries (of which two were opened up at first). The completed size of the tunnel is 22 feet in width by 16 in height. As soon as the headings were sufficiently advanced, Butler shovels, operated by compressed air, were installed for mucking. When the main portal was opened up, a Bucyrus-Erie air-gas shovel was brought in and made more rapid progress in the mucking.

Prior to this time, a scraper slide had also been employed in the pilot tunnel, equipped with a Sullivan “HDA-2’ Turbinair double drum slusher hoist. Air was supplied by two Sullivan “WJ3” Angle Compound compressors, and each operated by a 125 h. p. Fairbanks-Morse electric motor. Electric power is furnished by the Dixie Power Company from their hydroelectric station at LaVerkin, on the Virgin River, twenty-five miles distant.

The portable compressors were used to supply air for the drills for a period of about two and a half months, before the transmission line was completed, and the electrical equipment started up. Later, the Sullivan “WK-314” compressor was used as a “booster,” or auxiliary supply behind the Bucyrus-Erie shovel.

Tunnel Enlargement
After the 5 x 10 pilot heading is sufficiently advanced, the tunnel is enlarged to full diameter and height by a modification of the ring drilling system, first used at the Moffat tunnel in Colorado. As shown by the illustration on page 10, several columns are set at regular intervals on the center line of the tunnel. These columns are equipped with arms on which are mounted stoping drills, such as the Sullivan “DU-48” water jet stoper, of the self-rotating type, with reverse feed cylinder, as shown in the picture. The mounting is equipped with a quadrant plate with lines radiating from a center at uniform angles. All of the holes required for one round were drilled from a single setting of the column in the same plane, as shown in the illustration. Several drills could be used at the same time from different columns in this way, and this worked progressed very rapidly.

In this work, the softness of the sandstone permitted rapid drilling progress. The Sullivan stoper in a single 8-hour shift put in as many as 45 seven-foot holes, a total of 815 feet.

For ventilation and to a certain extent for light, six galleries are being opened up throughout the length of the tunnel from the tunnel line to the edge of the cliff, the length of the galleries varying in each case according to the nature of the rock, and the contour of the cliff wall. They range from 60 to 120 feet in length and are from 800 to 1200 feet apart. They are being opened sufficiently large to permit an automobile to turn in them. The tunnel is driven on a 5 per cent grade, rising from the western or portal end to the eastern end, a distance of nearly 300 feet in height.

Muck cars are pulled from the face by means of Sullivan “HA-2” compressed air portable hoists, as the 5 per cent grade is too steep for hand pushing. The cars were brought out to the face of the cliff through the galleries, and there dumped. By proper placing of pulleys and sheaves, cars were handled readily from either direction.

It was thought at first that the rock in the tunnel would stand without timbering. Owing, however, to its softness and ease of disintegration, it was found necessary to timber a considerable portion of its length.

The view from the side galleries, out over the precipitous cliff and across the canyon, is magnificent in the extreme.

Work on the tunnel proper has been delayed by timbering and other factors, but has advanced at an average speed of about 900 feet per month in all headings.

The State of Utah has all of its portion of road, approximately 18 miles, under construction. The contractors include the Raleigh-Lang C0. and the Reynolds-Ely Co. The former is employing portable compressors, including one 310-ft. Sullivan “WK-314” vibration-less unit, and hand hammer drills for their rock excavation. The Reynolds-Ely section is mostly earth excavation.

The author is indebted to the officials of the Nevada Contracting Company and to Mr. French of the Bureau of Public Roads, for information used in this article. The photographs were taken by Cliff Bray, Salt Lake photographer.
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SILVER REEF DEVELOPMENT EMJ 6 9 1928

A. S. A. & R. Co., Begins Operations at Silver Reef in Utah

AN EXTENSIVE development and full exploration program was started last week at the Silver Reef property, 20 miles from St. George, in Washington County, Utah, by American Smelting & Refining, which recently acquired
a controlling interest in the property from the Consolidated Gold Corporation.

Ground is being cleared for the sinking of a vertical three-compartment shaft, which is expected to encounter the orebody at a point 500 to 550 ft. below the surface. As soon as actual sinking begins, a crew of 20 to 30 men will he employed, operations being in charge of C. C. Cushwa, superintendent, and J. S. Hyde, master mechanic. A.Colhath, organizer of the Silver Reef enterprise, is being retained in a consulting capacity by the smelting company.

Low-grade silver ore, containing some copper, is found in two sandstone beds, known as the Buckeye and White reefs, the outcrops of which may be traced in the general shape of two, horseshoes. These reefs, dipping from 20 to 30 degs, were worked in the ‘eighties through several inclined shafts, extending a maximum distance of 800 ft. along the dip, or approximately 400 ft. vertically below the surface.

The beds appear to have a uniform thickness, and, although the metal content is low, there is evidence that sufficient tonnage may he developed to warrant extraction operations. The object of the present development is to prospect the continuation of the Buckeye reef at depth and to open up the old workings in this reef, which are now inaccessible.

Erection of surface buildings is under way, and the transformer capacity is being increased to handle the electrical power requirements of the equipment being installed, which includes a large double-drum, Ottumwa electric hoist and a 985-cn.ft. Chicago Pneumatic compressor
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UTAH MINING NEWS THE MINING JOURNAL 3 30 1929

for MARCH 30, 1929 UTAH

During the first 10 weeks of this year the Utah Apex Mining Company, J. A. Norden, general manager, Bingham, Utah, made a profit of $105,000 above operating costs at the mine. This sum was considerably larger than that received during the entire fiscal year 1928. During the middle of February the tonnage changed from lead-zinc ore containing 7 to 8 per cent lead to a lead-copper ore containing 3 to 5 per cent lead and there has been a slight decrease in revenue even though the tonnage increased. As long as the present grade of ore persists and nonferrous metal prices remain as currently quoted, earnings should continue at about the rate during the first 10 weeks of the year. The 2,900-foot level is the deepest working level at the present time, but before the end of the year it is planned to be developing at a depth of 3,400 feet.
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The report for 1928 of the Park Utah Consolidated Mine. Company shows a net income of $918,377, or 44 cents a share, after depreciation, federal taxes, etc., but before depletion, as compared with $1,-569,886, or 75 cents a share, earned in 1927.
The Ontario Silver-Mining Company, 98 per cent of whose stock is owned by the Park Utah Consolidated, has contributed a net profit of $95,973, after depreciation, taxes, etc., to the company income during 1928, as compared with a net of $60,498 in 1927. Commenting on the work done in 1928, President G. W. Lambourne states that the western ore body of the Utah unit has been a source of much satisfaction. On the 1,800, or lowest level, the ore has been continuous for 720 feet and averages 28 feet in width. This deposit is estimated to contain 595,000 tons between this level and the 1,500, or drain tunnel level, much of which remains to be mined. The Ontario unit responded well to development in the newer or eastern portions and plans are being made to unwater the lower workings during the coming summer for the purpose of mining known ore bodies.
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The shaft of the North Beck Mining Company, Arch Donaldson, superintendent, Eureka, Utah, has been sunk to a depth of 1,600 feet and a crosscut has been driven 75 feet to the west at that depth. Its face is now cutting through the Gemini limestone, which is considered favorable for the discovery of ore deposits in North Beck ground.
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The Central Standard Mining Company has done about 100 feet of drifting toward the south on the 1,200-foot level of its property, under the supervision of John W. Taylor, one of the original locators of the claims. The drift is following a promising fissure in the quartzite and monzonite formation. Another blower is being installed on the 1,200 level to supplement the one that is working on the 1,000 level.
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The property of the Superior Mining Company, comprising 10 patented claims in the Park City district in Utah, has been purchased by Charles Moore, president of the Star of Utah Mining Company. This mine adjoins the property of the Star of Utah Mining Company and the consideration involved in the deal is said to be $50,000.
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The Park City Consolidated Mining Company, J. J. Beeson, general manager, 602 Scott Building, Salt Lake City, is nearing the Silver King ore horizon at a depth of 180 feet. In addition to sinking the shaft to this depth, the company has done about 700 feet of development work on the Roosevelt tunnel level since starting work last October.
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Articles of incorporation have been filed in Salt Lake City, Utah, for the Hershey Mines Corporation, which has 10 lode mining claims in the Miner’s Basin district of the La Sal Mountains. The officers and directors are Norman D. Hershey, Castleton, Utah, president; W. A. Adams, Glassport, Pennsylvania, vice-president; M. H. Kriebel, secretary, and George A. Faust, treasurer, both of Salt Lake City, and L. F. Hershey, McKeesport, Pennsylvania.
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M. J. Fisher of Park City, Utah, and Leonard Lowery of Tooele have been awarded the contract to complete the lower tunnel in the property of the Hill Top Mining Company in the West Tintic district. This tunnel is intended to tap an ore chute from which Tinsman and Morgan of Eureka shipped several carloads of ore to the smelter that carried a lead content of more than 85 per cent and some silver and iron. This was in 1908, when the price of lead was $8.08 per hundred pounds. The lower tunnel will also drain the shaft, which is partly full of water at the present time. Parley Thueson of Tooele, Utah, is president and manager of the Hill Top organization.
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Charles Moore of Yuba, California, has acquired a controlling interest in the property of the Park Galena Mining Company, located in the southeastern Park City district in Utah, and it is understood that the property will be turned over to him at the annual stockholders’ meeting to be held on April 2. Considerable development has been done and has revealed low-grade ore, including a fissure carrying from one to five feet of ore that has been opened from the surface to a depth of 500 feet. It is said that the new management will run a drain tunnel to tap the property at a depth of between 1,200 and 1,400 feet, thereby lowering the present heavy pumping expenses. The Park Galena mill is temporarily idle, but regular shipments of crude ore are being made. During the first week in March shipments totaled 505,724 pounds.
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The Beaver Crown Consolidated Mining Company, F. C. Mitchell, superintendent, shipped a carload of ore from its property at Milford, Utah, that assayed 74.9 ounces silver, 42 per cent lead, 2.08 per cent copper and $1.40 gold to the ton from samples.
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The Howell Mining Company has resumed the development of the strike made about Christmas in the Tarbaby mine in the Alta district in Utah, according to A. 0. Johnson, 1111 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City. The strike was made about 30 feet above the Tarbaby tunnel and was followed 100 feet to the southwest. A drift has been started near the raise and on the tunnel level to strike the Cardiff overthrust contact on its dip. This point should be reached in about 85 feet. The Howell Mining Company’s assessment of 1 cent a share became delinquent March 15, 1929.
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Sinking of the new shaft in the property of the Crown Point Consolidated Mining Company in the East Tintic district has been resumed and the shaft has reached a depth of 280 feet. John Roundy of Provo is directing the work. A new Ingersoll-Rand five-drill electrically operated compressor has been installed and all equipment and buildings moved from the old shaft to the new one. At this depth, the bottom of the shaft is in sugar dolomite and at a depth of 500 feet the shaft is expected to cut one of the main northeast-southwest fissures.
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Easement through the East Utah tunnel at Keetlcy, Utah, adjoining the Park-Utah mine near Park City, has been granted to Charles Moore, president and manager of the Mayflower Mines Company, which recently has acquired control of the Park Galena and the Park Bingham groups. The Mayflower Company plans to extend the East Utah tunnel into Park Galena ground, a distance of 6,000 feet, gaining a vertical depth of 1,600 feet on the Glencoe fissure. This tunnel would also afford a working entrance to the Park Bingham and the Star of Utah groups, being developed by Mr. Moore, whose headquarters are at Yuba City, California.
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The Moscow Silver Mines Company, Milford, Utah, Garret S. Wilkin, general manager, has resumed hauling of ore and after the ore bins are emptied, development of the ore struck in the winze below the 1,400 level will be begun. At a depth of 1,540 feet in the winze, 15 feet of ore is showing. The company is now engaged in drifting along a strong east-west fissure productive of more than a million dollars from grass roots to a vertical depth of 1,100 feet.
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Sinking of the main three-compartment Cullen shaft to the 1,600 level is to begin at once.
Eldon Jenkins and William Finch have leased property in the Tintic district in Utah from the Chief Consolidated Mining Company and have shipped about five carloads of manganese to the plant of the Columbia Steel Corporation at Provo. A lumber chute has been built from the bins at the portal of the tunnel to the highway 350 feet below. Here the ore is loaded and trucked to Homansville, about a half mile, and shipped by rail to the Provo plant. During the war highgrade shipments were made from this property to the Atlantic coast.
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Owing to the shortage of silicious ores, Utah smelters have lowered their rate to $2.36 per ton on ore carrying a metallic content under $10, and it is believed that this will result in the resumption of work in the Dragon, Empire Mine., Star, Spy and other old-time Tintic mines. E. R. Higginson of Silver City is examining the Dragon and William Osborn and A. T. Higler are looking over the Star and Spy mines, all owned by the Knight interests. David Greenhalgh, also of Silver City, is working out a plan for economical transportation. He has secured a six-ton electric motor and intends to rebuild it to use gasoline. Twelve-ton cars that were formerly used at the Centennial Eureka mine have been purchased and will be used with the gasoline motor in hauling ore over the old Eureka Hill Railway.
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UTAH MINING NEWS THE MINING JOURNAL APRIL 15 1929

THE MINING JOURNAL April 15 1929


UTAH

The sum of $6,848,883 has been paid in dividends from Idaho Mines during March of this year. The highest figure was that of the Utah Copper Company, $6,497,959.

The Utah Rock Asphalt Corporation is preparing to ship from its silica quarry near Sunnyside, Utah. The output will be 1,250 tons daily. Henry H. Jones is general superintendent.

Milling tests are being made of the dumps of the Ohio Copper Company, at Lark, Utah, containing 4,995,495 tons of tailings and estimated to contain 47,405,671 pounds of copper. If preliminary work of the General Engineering Company at Salt Lake City is favorable, the company may mill this material.
Mining of a developed tonnage as well as an undeveloped tonnage, known as the East ore body, may be undertaken also. The company is continuing its leaching-in-place operations and also exploration of its limestone areas.
The company’s output for the year amounted to 8,977,982 pounds of copper as compared with 4,825,587 pounds for the year preceding. Operating profit was $119,012.89 as compared with $124,784.84 for 1927, and net profits were $68,162.09 for 1928 as compared with $46,458.75 for 1927. President Charles A. Kittle’s report for 1928 showed that all but $181,300 of the company’s 7 per cent bonds had been converted. Cash items as of January 1, 1929, amounted to $415,787.97. H. A. Tobelmann is agent in charge.

The Frisco Silver Lead Mining Company intends to install a Fairbanks-Morse gasoline hoist at its property in the Frisco District in Utah, where a shaft is being sunk below the tunnel level. L. F. Block is manager. Offices are maintained in the Atlas Building, Salt Lake City.

The Park City Consolidated Mines Company has cut a fissure at a depth of 200 feet in the shaft being sunk from the tunnel and the ore was followed as far as the 800 level. At a depth of 255 feet the ore was four feet wide and across that width assayed 49.1 ounces silver, 89 cents in gold, 1.7 per cent lead and .84 per cent copper. A station is being cut near where the Park City limestone is thought to exist and drifts will be run to explore that ground. J. J. Beeson, 502 Scott Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager of the company.

A compressor is to be installed by the Bingham Standard Mines Company at Bingham, Utah, and some consideration is being given to diamond drilling the ground, to check the location of the ore bearing formations. The lower tunnel has been driven 200 feet towards an ore deposit opened in the upper workings. The directors of the company are: J. C. Allen, William Thornton, James A. Nelson, L. L. Larson, T. S. Atkins and Fred E. Turner. Mine operations are under the supervisions of E. B. Jones.

Assessment No. 25 has been levied on the stock of the North Standard Mining Company payable on or before April 22, 1929, at the rate of 1 cent a share.

The Bingham Tonic Mining Company has levied an assessment of .8 cent per share on its stock outstanding. This is assessment No. 22 and became delinquent April 8, 1929.

The United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company earned $4,097,201 in 1928 as compared with $3,031,828 in the preceding year. The net profit last year is equivalent to $6.82 a share on 351,115 common shares against $3.78 a share in 1927. The regular dividend of 87½ cents on common and preferred stock and this is payable on April 15 to stock of record April 4.

The Sheep Rock Mining and Milling Company, W. A. Wilson, manager, 819 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, Utah, is putting in a hoist and compressor at its property in the Beaver District in Utah. Some work has been done by leasers in the Sheep Rock mine and includes shaft sinking and running levels. Work will be concentrated on the main ledge. Production to date is estimated at $100,000.

The Konold Mines Corporation has been admitted to trading on the Salt Lake Stock and Mining Exchange. Its capitalization is $875,000, consisting of 1,500,000 shares and all of the stock has been issued. There is no indebtedness and $1,188.85 cash on hand. Daniel Konold is president of the corporation. The property comprises 10 claims in the Elkhorn section of the Park City mining district, one of which is patented, and it is developed by 887 feet of shafts, 1,500 feet of tunnels and 670 feet of crosscuts.

Equipment, including a compressor, hoist, motors, headframe and water tanks, have been purchased for the property of the Standard Lily Extension Mines Company in the East Tintic District in Utah. Immediately upon its installation a shaft will be sunk. Frank Stewart is superintendent of operations.

The bunkhouse and office of the Beaver Crown Consolidated Mines Company were destroyed by fire on March 18, according to Superintendent Frank C. Mitchell, Box 172, Milford, Utah. A modern bunkhouse will be built as soon as the roads are in condition to permit hauling in lumber from Beaver. The company has just shipped a carload of high-grade lead-silver-copper-gold ore from the recent discovery in the Parker drift and it is believed that the ore will net about $75 per ton.

The American Metal Mining Company has levied assessment No. 15, payable at the rate of 4 cent a share to Walter H. Voyles, secretary and treasurer, 152 East Second South Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. Date of delinquency is April 22, 1929. More than 1,700 feet of development have been done on the lower level iii the company’s property at Big Cottonwood Canyon and mineral showings encountered during the last 100 feet have been favorable for the location of a body of ore.

Announcements of dividend disbursements have been made by the following mining companies:

The Tintic Standard Mining Company paid a dividend of 80 cents a share on March 30, amounting to $345,874.50, and increasing the grand total of the Tintic Standard mine to $12,-283,812;

The Park Utah Consolidated Mining Company paid at the rate of 20 cents a share, amounting to $418,700 on April 10, and bringing the grand total to $86,905,461.55;

and the Silver King Coalition Mines Company made its payment of 25 cents a share on April 1, amounting to $805,116 and increasing the grand total to more than $23,000,000.

The New Quincy Mining Company at Park City, Utah, has increased shipments to 150 tons daily and no great hole has yet been made in the 1,238 ore body, according to Manager A. L. Hurley. This stope has been opened up for a width of between 60 and 70 feet and measures 40 feet in thickness. At the west end of the bed, two drifts are being advanced in the hanging wall and two other faces in the footwall 40 feet below. All of these drifts are from 50 to 100 feet ahead of the stope and are following full faces of ore with a bedded deposit between ranging from 50 to 60 feet wide. At the other end of the stope, ore has been drifted on for 100 feet.

The Tintic Lead Company has opened its Horn Silver mine at Frisco, Utah, to a depth of 1,100 feet and leasers are engaged in following strong leads of ore into untouched limestone on every level from this depth to the 100 level, according to Mine Manager A. E. Kipps. On the 500 level south a face of ore 10 x 12 feet has been opened and assays 44 per cent zinc, 20 per cent lead, 20 ounces silver and $2.50 in gold per ton. Ore of good grade is being mined on the 200 level.

Purchase of the Mono group of 16 acres in the Ophir-Dry Canyon district, near Stockton, Utah, gives the Ophir Mono Mines, Inc., possession of 1,600 acres in the heart of that district. Two faces of ore have been opened in the Mono limestone bed, 400 feet apart, parallel to that from which Matt Gisborn took a million dollars 50 years ago, according to Manager M. C. Godbe. Samples of the ore range in value from $1 to $120 in gold, from 90 to 8,700 ounces in silver and from 28 to 48 per cent in lead to the ton.

Operations have been resumed by the Silver Standard’ Mining Company in the Santaquin Mining District, near Payson, Utah. The shaft, down 489 feet, will be sunk to the 500 level, where drifting will be started. Perry B. Fuller is president of the Silver Standard and F. P. Higginbotham, 815 Dooly Building, Salt Lake City, is secretary-treasurer.

The Beaver Copper Company will begin production and shipment of copper ore from its property in the Beaver Lake mining district in Utah, as soon as the compressor and equipment that has been ordered can be hauled to the mine and installed, according to Manager A. J. McMullan, Milford. Settlement sheets have shown the better grade running 8.6 per cent copper with some lower grade that can now be handled profitably. The lead section of the company’s property is well equipped but it is too far from the copper ore to deliver the air (ventilation).
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 6 30 1929

THE MINING JOURNAL JUNE 30 1929

UTAH

The Lehi Tintic Mining Company, Charles Zabriskie, general manager, 1118 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, has suspended other work while sinking the shaft from the 750-foot level to the 1,100-foot point. Work is being rushed and crosscutting will be started at the lowest level to explore the favorable limestone beds of the ore zone showing on the 750 level. Ninety-five per cent of the Tintic Empire stock has been exchanged for Lehi Tintic stock and it is said that the drift into Tintic Empire ground is being advanced to the intersection of several promising fissures.
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Eight carloads of high-grade ore have been shipped from the 1,565 level of the Moscow Silver Mine. Company. G. S. Wilkin, manager, Milford, Utah, and the ninth lot is being prepared. One shipment from the fissure netted $2,119, after smelting and freight tariffs, a shipment from the bedded deposit assayed 21.45 ounces silver, 50.4 per cent lead, 15.8 per cent iron, which will net close to $8,000.
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The Tintic Lead Company, A. E. Kipps, manager, has installed its new compressor and transformers at Frisco, Utah, and connections are nearly made. Regular shipments are being made and during a seven-day period about June 10, totaled 10 carloads of ore.
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The Georgia Lyn Mining Company, W. R. Kone, president and general manager, 720 Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has opened a strongly mineralized formation in crosscutting from the main tunnel, which has reached a length of 1,100 feet. Mineralization appeared 75 feet from the tunnel and has continued a distance of 50 feet. Samples of the ore carry from 5 to 6 ounces of silver and from 31 to 61 per cent lead to the ton. Equipment on the ground includes a compressor and gas engine.
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The Mammoth Mining Company, Samuel McIntyre, president and manager, Mammoth, Utah, is producing approximately 50 railroad carloads of ore monthly from a new deposit between the 1,100 and the 1,500 levels. The ore is 1,600 feet north of the shaft and is believed to be the extension of a deposit mined some time ago in the Plutus mine. Mining is difficult as the system of faulting makes it hard to follow the ore. The low-grade deposits in the mine and the dumps are not being worked at the present time as it is said the offers from the smelters have not been attractive enough.
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The Tintic Standard Mining Company will disburse its regular quarterly dividend of $346,024.50 on June 27, to stock of record June 17. Payment will be 20 cents a share regular and 10 cents a share special, making a total of 30 cents, which has been disbursed for a long time.
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A gas driven compressor and a hoist have been ordered for the Eureka DeLux Mining, which has organized development of its property, near Eureka, Utah. John A. Johnson will have charge of development, assisted by Imer Pett, T. P. Billings, and other members of the Bingham Mines staff. The main tunnel is to be continued with power drills and sinking may be done from this level. The Eureka DeLux officers are: J. H. Peterson, president; F. D. Cassity, vice-president, and Mr. Johnson, secretary and treasurer. These with Nephi Anderson and Henry Jackson constitute the board of directors.
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A geological examination has been made of the property of the Benmore Mining and Milling Company, controlling 45 claims in the Columbia Mining District, about 20 miles west of Eureka, Utah, and embracing what was formerly known as the Sharp Lead Mine. Initial work will be retimbering the portal and enlarging the Smith Tunnel on the Mary L. Claim, followed by the exploration of a silver-lead deposit believed to exist beneath a manganese deposit found on the April Shower No. 9 claim. Seth Pixton, president of the Columbia Trust Company, 125 South Main Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, is president of the Benmore Mining Company.
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The Silver King Extension Mines Company, organized a short time ago by Clarence and Ernest Bamberger, Box 1328, Salt Lake City, Utah, has engaged two shifts in advancing its tunnel to a length of 500 feet. The portal of the tunnel is south of Park City, near the old Beggs mill. Arrangements are being made for the installation of new machinery to speed up the work.
===
Assessment No. 26 has been levied on the stock of the Three Kings Consolidated Mining Company, Cameron McKay, superintendent, Park City, Utah, to provide funds for the development of two promising fissures encountered. Payment is to be made at the rate of 2 cents a share, on or before June 24, 1929. During the past two months, development has been advanced steadily.
===
The Utah Apex Mining Company, J. A. Norden, general manager, Bingham, Utah, has removed the bulkheads from the 1,250 level of the Utah Apex Mine, to determine whether or not work may be resumed in that part of the mine. These bulkheads were erected several years ago, when a fire broke out, to prevent the flames and gases from penetrating other parts of the workings, and it is believed that the fire has burned itself out.
===
Directors of the Bingham Mines Company have decided to sell all the holdings and assets of the company at Eureka and Bingham, Utah, to the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company.
Stock of the Bingham mines will be exchanged on a share-for-share basis. Bingham Mines is incorporated for 50,000 shares. Imer Pett, 404 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, is general manager. Its main producers are the Victoria and Eagle and Blue Bell mines at Tintic, and the Dalton and Lark and other mines at Bingham. Stockholders are to meet July 27 to ratify the deal.
===
The stock of the New Qunicy Mining Company, has been listed on the Salt Lake Stock and Mining Exchange. The company is shipping 100 tons from its Park City property daily. A. L. Hurley, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City Utah, is manager.
===
The North Standard Mining Company has installed a blower and ventilation pipe at its East Tintic property to provide better air for sinking its winze now down to the 1,216-foot level. Geologic conditions similar to those found near the Big East Tintic ore bodies have quickened interest in the development of the property.
From the 800 level down to the 1,216, the company has sunk in a great brecciated zone, carrying strong mineralization and at the 1,185 level, ore assaying $3 to $4 in gold, 41 per cent lead and 24 ounces silver to the ton has been opened.
On the 1,200 level, the brecciated zone showed a width of 100 feet. Company offices are in the Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City. B. T. Walker, field engineer of the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, is doing the company’s geologic work.
===
The National Treasure Mining Company is driving a tunnel crosscutting the Buckhorn limestone in its Ophir Dry Canyon property, near Ophir, Utah. Gordon McMillan is superintendent. The property is equipped with a compressor and gas engine.
===
The Silver Contact Mining Company expects to resume operations in its property in American Fork Canyon, 26 miles south of Salt Lake City, June 20. During the last two years a tunnel has been run about 400 feet to cut ore encountered in an incline shaft, but lost when this heading caved in. A contract has been let to finish a 75-foot raise above the tunnel as recommended by the late President J. B. Beveridge of Salt Lake City. Additional work may be done to explore an iron blowout on the surface and 300 feet from the tunnel. The directors of the organization are: S. B- Robbins, H. P. Huey, J. W. Dunyon, F. W. Newton and B. Grant Stringham.
===
The stock of the Union Associated Mines Company, S. A. Parry, president and general manager, 509 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has been listed on the Salt Lake Stock and Mining Exchange. The property comprises 64 unpatented claims in the Big Cottonwood and Erickson mining districts, equipped with boarding and bunk houses, a compressor and other mining machinery. Official reports are that the initial shipment is being made and about 40,000 tons of milling ore is in sight. Mineral values are lead, silver, gold, copper and zinc.
===
The Utah Copper Company, L. S. Cates, general manager, Bingham, Utah, has declared a dividend of $4 a share, payable June 29, to stock of record June 14, 1928. This is the regular quarterly disbursement.
===
The strike on the 900 level of the Bingham Metals Company, Bingham, Utah, has widened to seven feet in the face and shows every indication of developing into a large deposit, according to President W. H. Mitchell, Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. The ore is reported to carry 20 per cent lead, 10 ounces silver and several dollars in gold to the ton. Rich ore was previously mined on the 680-foot level, but the formation proved barren at the 900 level, giving rise to the idea that the ore on the upper levels was only pockets. One carload of ore is in the bins and another is broken ready for hoisting and shipment.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 9 30 1929

The Park Kearns Mining Company, owning a group of three patented and six unpatented mining claims in the Park City district in Utah, has been granted permission to sell 3,000,000 shares of its stock at 10 cents a share. Funds realized from the sales will be used in equipping the ground with machinery and in carrying out mine development. George H. Short, 506 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, is consulting engineer for the Park Kearns and will have charge of development. Work will be centered on the Copper Queen discovery pit, where previous workings have disclosed ore, assaying as high as 22 per cent copper and $3 gold to the ton.
--==-
The Bingham Metals Company, Robert J. Goodwin, superintendent, Bingham Canyon, Utah, has opened two gold-copper fissures on the 900, or lowest level, of its property. These fissures are two and two and one-half feet wide, but drifting and stoping will not be started until the station in the vertical shaft has been cut, so that one job will not interfere with the other. A hoist, cage, and some other equipment, has been ordered to carry out the work. A drift has been extended 25 feet along a six-foot oreshoot opened on the 900 level, opened late in August, and one shipment has been made that returned $25 per ton in lead, silver and gold. Under contract, the Utah Copper Company is moving the Bingham Metals camp to the Nast shaft and is building a new road from the ore bin to the loading station.
----=
The spur track being built to the property of the Eureka Standard Consolidated Mining Company at Dividend, Utah, by the Denver and Rio Grande Railway, is nearly completed. The Eureka Standard is installing a hoist, compressor and some other equipment and will increase production within a few weeks. Connection has been made between the main shaft and the winze at a depth of 1,800 feet and at points about 350 feet apart and as soon as the ore bins at the collar of the shaft are ready to receive the ore, it will be taken out through the company’s workings, instead of through the adjoining Tintic Standard workings, as at the present time. J. W. Wade, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager.
---==
The Standard Lily Extension Mines Company, Arthur Sylvester, superintendent, Eureka, Utah, has sunk the new shaft in the Tintic Coalition claim, 400 feet. It will be used jointly by the North Lily Mining and the Standard Company. A water tank, having a capacity of about 4,000 gallons, formerly used by the Eureka Hill Railway Company, is being moved to the Standard mine to hold water from the wells of the Chief Consolidated company at Homansville.
--===
Announcement has been received that the Utah Copper Company, L. S. Cates, general manager, Bingham Canyon, Utah, will pay its regular quarterly dividend of $4 a share on September 30, to stock of record September 18, 1929. The disbursement calls for $6,497,960 and brings the grand total of payments to $188,672,889.
-====
Twenty-seven tons of ore have been shipped from the Apex mine at St. George, Utah, to the International Smelter at Tooele. Another shipment is being taken out and prospects are promising. S. C. Hardy is working the ground under lease from the Utah Southern Mining Company, W. H. Hendrickson, manager, Millford, Utah.
=====
The Monoceo Mining Company, Gold Hill, Utah, J. W. Jensen, superintendent, has shipped its initial carload of ore to a local smelter, and received $88 per ton, after freight and treatment charges were deducted. Last fall a tunnel was started into this property and in between 150 and 160 feet from the portal entered a five-foot width of ore. The ores being mined during the progress of tunneling have carried from 15 to 80 per cent copper, from 10 to 12 ounces silver and from $5 to $8 in gold per ton. Between 400 and 600 feet of additional tunnel will be necessary to reach a point vertically below surface outcrops. P. A. Dansie is president of the company, and its offices are in the Ness Building, Salt Lake City.
====-
Extensive improvements are planned by the Silver King Western Mining and Milling Company, according to M. J. Dailey, general manager, 1012 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. These include putting in pipelines, erecting camp buildings, installing a compressor and continuing an underground drift. This organization was formed by the Kearns interests, to develop property at Park City, and 50 men are in its employ at the present time.
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The Utah-Indiana Mining Company, R. J. Hollingsworth, president and superintendent, 558 East First South Street, Salt Lake City, is working a force of nine men at its property at Sandy, Utah. This is a comparatively new organization and improvements, including a boarding house, bunkhouse, machine and blacksmith shop are planned. S. F. Johnson is general manager of the company. Gas is used as power in developing the mine through a 1,000-foot tunnel.
==--=
The directors of the Park Utah Consolidated Mines Company, George W. Lambourne, president and manager, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, have decided to omit the fourth quarterly dividend of 20 cents a share, because of high operating costs and the delay in getting work started on the lowest level of the Park Utah unit. Good progress is being made in un-watering the 1,950 level of the Park Utah, and important objectives are looked for in the Bonanza Flat country. Shipments are averaging 4,500 tons weekly. During 1928, the Park Utah Consolidated was the largest silver producer in America and the largest lead producer in Utah. Its output exceeded in tonnage any other mine in the state outside of the Utah Copper, an open pit mine.
=--==
Ore has been struck in the property of the New Bingham, Mary Mining Company, adjoining the Utah Apex property at Bingham Canyon, Utah. Six feet of ore have been drifted on for 20 feet and samples of the high-grade body assayed 12.4 ounces silver, 60 per cent lead and 2.16 per cent copper to the ton. A good-sized body of milling ore has been exposed on the 1,000-foot level. The ore is being mined for the New Bingham Mary by the Utah Apex, on a cost plus basis, and the milling ore is being put through the Utah Apex mill. George Wilson, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, is manager.
--===
Six carloads of ore have been shipped from the 500 level of the Park Galena property at Park City, Utah, during August, and two more during the first 10 days of September. Returns are averaging around $1,000 a carload. Drifting to the west on ore is being done to reach the sedimentaries, where larger ore bodies are expected. The Mayflower Mines Corporation, a Charles Moore enterprise, has advanced its tunnel 600 feet. This adit will develop at depth the Park Galena, the Park Bingham and the Mayflower mines. K. G. Link of Keetley, Utah, is superintendent of the Park Galena.
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The North Lily Mining Company, Eureka, Utah, J. S.. Finlay, superintendent, has opened good sized bodies of ore in both raises from the 1,200-foot level. In 1,217 raise, from eight to 10 feet of ore have been cut and in the other, 150 feet distant, a bedded deposit 25 feet thick has been opened. On the 800-foot level a full face of ore has been opened, believed to be the downward continuation of the deposit stoped on the upper levels between the main ore body and the south endline.
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The AIta Tunnel and Transportation Company, Lloyd Hoskins, mine manager, is treating 40 tons of ore in its mill in 24 hours and 10 tons of concentrate, carrying $40 to $50 a ton in silver, lead and zinc, are being hauled by motor truck to the Midvale smelter. The mine run is averaging 8 per cent lead, 8 ounces silver and 7.5 per cent zinc to the ton, and the ratio of concentration four to one and recoveries around 70 per cent.
==--=
Production of the New Quincy mine at Park City, Utah, has been advanced to 200 tons daily and net profit has increased from $50,000 in July to $90,000 in August. During September, Manager A. L. Hurley estimates that the company will make $125,000. On September 10 or 12, directors of the company were to meet to declare the second dividend of 10 cents a share, payable September 28. The outlook for the mine is good, according to Mr. Eurley. Opening up of the bedded ore deposit from the main, or 1,200 level, in a dozen places has greatly simplified operations. The ore runs about $25 to $80 a ton, net smelter returns. Ben Beveridge is mine superintendent.
=--==
Operations are being carried on at two points in the Utah Bunker Hill Mine in the Free Coinage District, near Grantsville, Utah. Buildings are being erected over the company’s compressor plant and ore is being followed in the Johnson Lease. John V. Long, 425 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager.
==--==
A dividend of 25 cents a share is to he paid on stock of the Silver King Coalition
Mines Company, on October 1, to stock of record September 20. This dividend of $805,116.75 increases the grand total of disbursements to $23,781,487.95. M. J. Dailey, Reams Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is general manager.

Tbe Tintic Standard Mining Company, E. J. Raddatz, president and general manager, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, has declared a regular dividend of 20 cents a share, and a special of 10 cents a share, or $845,945.50, to be paid on September 30. This disbursement increases the grand total to $12,825,921.
==--===
Arrangements are being made for the development of the Silver Glance Mine, 12 miles from Wendover, Tooele County, Utah, located in the winter of 1927-28 by C. G. Smith. This ground has since been incorporated by a group, known as the Silver Glance Mining Company, of which L. A. Toothaker of Palisade, Colorado, is secretary-treasurer. All the development that has been done is surface trenching, and ore, assaying 24 per cent lead and 12 ounces silver per ton, has been opened.
-----
A Sullivan two-drill compressor and a McCormick-Deeming 30-horsepower gasoline engine have been hauled to the property of the Bingham Standard Coalition Company in the West Mountain District, 50 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. Plans have been made for a number of surface improvements, including a new building over the new machinery and a new bunkhouse to accommodate the crew near the portal of the tunnel. Within a few weeks, the management expects to continue the lower tunnel below the Mayflower workings.
==--=
The Capitol Hill Mining Company has shipped its first carload of ore from the new strike in the Star District, six miles from Milford, Utah, according to Secretary F. C. Higginbotham. Samples of this ore assay 80 per cent lead and from 40 to 50 ounces silver to the ton.
=--==
The Kamas Gold Mining Company, holding mineral rights to 1,200 acres in the Park City District in Utah, is making arrangements to prospect its holdings. Several years ago the shaft was sunk in the limestone and shows mineralization for about 50 feet along the north wall. A tunnel has opened a two-foot fissure filled with quartz and iron, and will be extended farther. The officers in this company, are Newton Dunyon, president;
J. B. Hoyt, vice-president, and Douglas Simpson, secretary-treasurer.
==-==-
The Park Bingham Mining Company, 210 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, levied an assessment of 1 cent a share on its outstanding stock. This is No. 17. Stock on which the assessment has not been paid by October 1, 1929, will be advertised for sale. J. A. Foley is secretary to the company.
==---
Rather extensive improvements have been planned for the property of the Golden Porphyry Mines Company, including driving a new adit tunnel, electrification, compressors, machine shop, power drills, etc. Later, a mill and retort will be added to the equipment. Three men are working at the mine now. The officers of the organization include J. B. Wallace, president, 17 West First South Street, Salt Lake City, and N. Schmittroth, general manager and purchasing agent, Route 5, Sandy, Utah.
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The Uncle Bim Mining Company, Lund, Utah, is sinking a shaft in its property. Seven men are working in the mine and office. This was formerly known as the Arrowhead Mining Company. James B. Allen, Route 1, Box 74, Sugarhouse Station, Salt Lake City, is general manager.
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Flotation machinery is being installed in the milling plant of the Big Indian Copper Company, Preston G. Peterson, secretary and manager, Provo, Utah, and when in place will permit the milling of 100 tons of ore daily. No extensive remodeling will be necessary to bring the mill into operation. Although there is enough ore to keep the company busy for a number of years, the mill has not been operated due to unsatisfactory metallurgical process.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 10 15 1929

THE MINING JOURNAL for OCTOBER 15, 1929

UTAH

Two dividends were paid from mines, in the State of Utah, during the past month, amounting to $6,843,954. These were paid by the Utah Copper Company, and the Tintic Standard Mining Company.
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It is understood that the exploration department of the American Smelting and Refining Company, A. H. Means, manager, 625 McCornick, Building, Salt Lake City, will install a 360-cubic foot compressor at the Tintic Ophir property, Ophir, Utah, and set up buildings to accommodate 10 men. A power line is being run to these mines and prospecting through two headings, has been contracted to Jack Mooso. The western mining department of the American Smelting Company is working at Park City and at Leeds, Utah, and near Bishop, California.
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The Moscow Silver Mines Company, Milford, Utah, G. S. Wilkin, general manager, has opened a streak of ore, from 16 to 18 inches wide, that assays $1 gold, 17 ounces silver and 6.5 per cent lead to the ton. This discovery was made at the 1,520 level of the shaft, which is being lowered to a depth of 1,600 feet. Leasers recently mined a carload of ore from the Glory Stope, on the 900-foot level that assayed 52 per cent lead and 22.8 ounces silver to the ton. Work has been stopped in the winze from the 1,565 level because of water. In the raise from the same level sulphide has replaced the carbonate ores.
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While raising from the main tunnel, to cut the projection of a stope, from which high-grade mill ore was being removed, the AIta Tunnel and Transportation Company, Lloyd Hoskins, mine manager, Alta, Utah, opened 18 inches of galena ore. The directors have assessed the shares 1 cent each to pay off indebtedness.
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The net profit of the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company for the first eight months of this year were $3,046,509, after interest, depletion, depreciation and amortization, against $2,369,678 in the same period of last year. This, after the payment of preferred dividends, is equal to $3.86 a share on 640,562 shares of common stock as compared with $3.52 a share on 351,117 shares of common stock in the 1928 period. The directors have just announced that 87 1/2 cents quarterly will be paid on both the common and preferred shares on October 15, to stock of record October 7, 1929. D. D. Muir, Jr., Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is general manager of the western department.
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The Silver King Coalition Mines Company, M. J. Dailey, general manager, Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, is milling both the high-grade and low-grade ores, because it is more economical to wash out the silica, and ship a lead and a zinc concentrate. Many new features, including dewatering and settling tanks, new McIntosh cells and blowers, have been added to the mill within the last year. The average monthly production is 19,000 tons, about two-thirds of which comes from the Silver King area to the north, and the remainder from the Silver Hill ground, to the south. About 2,800 tons of lead concentrate and 1,200 tons of zinc concentrate are recovered and shipped each month.
==-=-=-=
The Falk Mining Company, E. C. Berry, superintendent, Grantsville, Utah, intends to continue its tunnel 200 feet through the Ophir lime. On Monarch Hill, a shaft is to be sunk 300 feet to the Creek level, and a winze sunk 100 feet below the Monarch tunnel. Twelve men are working. L. E. Cluff, 1309 Walker Building, Salt Lake City, is president, and the operating officials include Charles W. Allsop of Salt Lake City, general manager; N. B. Crawford, construction engineer; E. C. Engelhardt, consulting engineer, and Bryce Forrester, chief geologist.
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No time will be lost in starting work at the Twentieth Century, the Big Hill, and the Empire mines, of the North Lily Knight Company, in the Tintic District in Utah. J. O. Elton, 818 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, is manager of the enterprise. A crew is building a road to connect with the highway from Eureka, to the North Lily mine. The Big Hill Shaft, now down 600 feet, will be enlarged and retimbered, and continued to a depth of 1,500 feet. The Twentieth Century may be developed either from the above-mentioned shaft, or from the Iron King shaft.
=-=-=---
It is planned to build a mill at the property of the Sheep Rock Mining and Milling Company, near Beaver, Utah, according to W. A. Wilson, president, 319 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City. At the present time lessees are operating the ground under bond and lease, with five men employed.
=--===--
The Alta Michigan Mines Company is making preparations for the deep development of the properties, which it controls, according to G. H. Watson, president and manager, 25 East South Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. These mines include the Emma Silver, the Alta Merger, and the Alta Consolidated, and are inactive at the present time.
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The Benmore Mining and Milling Company, Seth Pixton, president, 125 South Main Street, Salt Lake City, intends to install new machinery in its lower workings, so that the tunnel can be driven to the downward extension of the ore bodies, from which about 4,000 tons of ore have been mined and shipped. Financial arrangements are being made now toward that end.
==--===-
To provide funds for development, the directors of the Mineral Park Mining Company have levied assessment No. 6 at the rate of 14 cent per share, payable on or before October 15, 1929. Hand power is used in developing the mine, where two men are driving a tunnel. G.
W. Alexander, 433 Eighth East Street, Salt Lake City, is president and general manager.
=-=--==
The Tintic Lead Company, A. E. Kipps, general manager, 215 Regent Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is producing between 50 and 100 tons of ore daily, at the Horn Silver Mine at Frisco, Utah. P. O. Clark is general superintendent of operations. Increased production is planned. The present crew of 75 men is to be doubled and development increased, according to General Manager Kipps. A vertical shaft has been sunk to a depth of 1,600 feet, with levels at 200-foot intervals, and a large tonnage of high-grade primary ore is in sight.
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The Sioux Mines Company, E. F. Birch, manager, Eureka, Utah, has shipped five carloads of ore from its lease, on the Iron Blossom Mine, adjoining Sioux ground. Returns from the smelter show that the ore runs 18 per cent lead, 20 ounces silver and $2.40 gold to the ton. The ore has been followed to the Sioux line, and it is understood that Mr. Birch intends to sink on the ore.
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It is understood that the Park City Amalgamated Mines Company, H. G. Snyder, president, 412 Judge Building, Salt Lake City, will do some drilling in its property in the east Park City District in Utah, although churn drilling carried on during recent months, by the International Smelting Company, has done much in determining the geology of the district. The Park City Amalgamated controls 2,500 acres in three groups.

The North Lily Mining Company, Eureka, Utah, J. S. Finlay, superintendent, has resumed sinking of the North Lily Shaft, where sinking was stopped temporarily last July, at a depth of 1,600 feet. The immediate objective is the Cambrian quartzite, about 75 feet deeper. At about 35 feet below the present depth a station will be cut and drifting started on a level to coincide with the Tintic Standard 1,300-foot level.
Later, a connection will be made between these shafts for ventilation and to insure safety conditions. The flow of water released on the 700 North Drift in July, has dropped off to 300 gallons a minute and is being diverted into an open fissure without any appreciable effect on other headings, so that pumping may be unnecessary, although the pumping equipment has been installed.
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An assessment of 1 cent a share has been levied on the stock of the North Standard Mining Company, payable to John Dorius, secretary, 412 Walker Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. Date of delinquency is October 16, 1929.
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FALK MINING AT GRANTSVILLE, UT TMJ 10 15 1929

THE MINING JOURNAL OCTOBER 15 1929

FALK MINING CO. IS WORKING AT GRANTSVILLE, UTAH

The property of the Falk Mining Company consists of 24 claims, in the Grantsville Mining District, Tooele County, Utah. This district, sometimes known as the ‘Free Coinage’, has had but one heavy producer, the old “Third Term” Mine, which was closed by litigation in the early ‘90s, after it had produced about a million dollars. No work of any consequence followed until the Falk Company started development about a year and a half ago. This work consisted principally of driving a 900-foot tunnel.

The geology of the section, according to N. B. Crawford of Eureka, Utah, engineer for the company, is best described as being a cross section of the famous East Tintic District, known locally as the “Ophir” formation. Two major fissures cross the property, one being an extension of the Third Term fissure. The larger of these is mineralized directly from the intrusion. Good values have been obtained at many places along the fissure, and on the contacts, but the major feature is the strong croppings of gossan showing copper values.

The company is driving a tunnel through a complex faulted area. Ground water has been encountered and as soon as the soluble formation is reached, bodies of replacement ore should be encountered as the tunnel level is now below the effect of the leaching from surface waters.

Since the Falk Mining Company started working in this district, several other companies have been organized and are now working nearby and adjacent ground.
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TINTIC DISTRICT MINING NEWS UTAH TMJ 10 30 1929

THE MINING JOURNAL for OCTOBER 30, 1929

TINTIC STANDARD CONTROLS FIVE PROJECTS IN TINTIC DIST.

The new standard-gauge railroad spur from Dividend, to the Eureka Standard, has been completed, permitting ore from the main shaft to be dumped directly into railroad cars. Two lower levels have been connected with the shaft, a new Wellman Seaver-Morgan electrical hoist, and a 2,500-cubic foot Ingersoll-Rand compressor, installed. Underground operations have been suspended temporarily to permit the installation of an 85-foot headframe and within 60 days the Tintic Standard Mining Company expects to have its youngest mine in production.

Tintic Standard is carrying on five projects in widely separated areas in the Tintic district, near Eureka, Utah. Of these, the Tintic Standard mine has been the principal producer and, according to J. W. Wade, assistant general manager, the revenue during the first nine months of 1929 more than equaled dividend requirements during that period.

The Iron Blossom and the Colorado are old mines which have produced a large tonnage and give promise of yielding heavily from virgin areas. An average of a carload of ore is being produced daily from the former and development will be expedited when connection is completed between its 2,180, or lowest, level, and the 1,914 level of the Colorado.

The Iron King is still a prospect. Two headings are being run in development— one to explore the Cambrian quartzite, richly mineralized in the Eureka Standard, and the other in the Ophir limestone, productive in the Eureka Lily, the North Lily and the Tintic Standard.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 10 30 1929

THE MINING JOURNAL FOR 10 30 1929

UTAH

Material is being delivered at the portal of the Wasatch drain tunnel, of the Mineral Veins Coalition Mines Company, near Alta, Utah, for the construction of the first unit of a flotation mill. Experiments to determine the most profitable process for treating the ore, have shown a combination of machinery that can handle the various complex ores in the district. The ground is owned by A. P. Swoboda of New York City. A. O. Jacobson, 1118 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, is manager of Mineral Veins Coalition.
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The Big Indian Copper Company, Preston G. Peterson, secretary and manager, Provo, Utah, has made several successful tests in its remodeled 100-ton flotation plant south of Moab. The crushing department has been working for several days and the ore bins are full in preparation for continuous milling.
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Assessment No. 3 of 1 cent per share, has been levied on the stock of the Kearsarge Standard Mining Company, payable at 304 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. Date of delinquency was October 5.
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The Treasure Box Mining Company, Inc., has levied assessment No. 33 at the rate of 1/2 cent a share. Payment was to have been made on, or before, October 10, 1929, to M. L. Scott, secretary, 202 Atlas Building, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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Gas emanating from the east drift on the 1,225-foot level of the property of the North Standard Mining Company, Eureka, Utah, M. McPolin, superintendent, continues to interfere with development. The drift has been advanced 100 feet to prospect a north-south fissure, opened at the 900, 1,000 and other levels, and passed through quartz, iron, manganese and barite. Many of the best finds in the East Tintic District were located in the gaseous areas.
-=-=-=-=
According to Superintendent Gay, the shops and boarding house of the Mayflower Mines Corporation, near Park City, Utah, will be ready for use before winter sets in. The bunkhouse is completed and in use. Good progress is being made in advancing the long tunnel.
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William J. Candlish, 906 Lafayette Street, and Clinton M. Smith, consulting engineer, both of Denver, Colorado, have been making arrangements to operate the Adams vanadium property in Kirk’s Basin, Grand County, Utah, through the winter. Three five-ton Coleman, and two Graham, trucks are used in hauling the ore to Cisco, from which point it is shipped to their reduction plant in Denver. Messrs. Candlish and Smith has offered to co-operate with the commissioners in improving the Cisco-Castleton road to afford safe operation of their trucks. It is understood that the ultimate objective is to build a concentrating plant at Moab, Utah.
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Shipments from Bingham Canyon, Utah, include about 500 carloads of ore daily, by the Utah Copper Company; and 4,050 tons a week by the Utah Apex Mining Company, over the tramway to the International mill at Tooele, Utah. Average weekly shipments made from other mines in the district include: 100 carloads from the United States Mine; 14 carloads from the Bingham Prospect; 14 carloads from the Utah Metal and Tunnel, and 2 carloads from the Ohio Copper property.
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The Union Associated Mines Company, S. A. Parry, president and manager, 509 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has added a night shift in driving the Big Cottonwood tunnel. It has cut through two strongly mineralized veins, containing ore and the face gives indications of reaching another deposit. Carl Swanson is superintendent at the Big Cottonwood mine.
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The Oroplata Mining Company, J. E. MacFarlane, president and general manager, Nephi, Utah, has definitely selected the location for a new shaft, and will go ahead with the work as soon as funds are available. A small force is employed regularly, and small lots of ore are shipped by trucks, to the smelter to help defray expenses. Evan Harris is superintendent.
President and General Manager Charles Zabriskie is advancing two headings in the Lehi TinticMine in the Tintic District, to penetrate mineralized zones located by a geophysical survey just completed by Carl W. Chilson, co-inventor of the Chilson radio process. Several hundred feet of drifting have been done to the northeast on the 750-foot level and between eight and 10 feet of advancement is recorded daily. It is understood that the Chilson survey has revealed seven deposits of ore.
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The shaft of the Standard Lily Extension Mines Company, H. G. Snyder, president, 412 Judge Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has reached the 600-foot level, and at that depth, exploration is being started in the Ajax limestone to reach the extension of strong mineralization at the surface and on the 300-foot level. This prospecting is being done cooperatively by the Standard Lily and the International Smelting Companies.
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The East Tintic Coalition, where the shaft is being lowered, has been equipped with new buildings, a hoist, compressor, and other machinery, all electrically driven. Timber framing and blacksmith work is being done at the North Lily mine, of the International company.
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Following the advice of Paul Billingsley, consulting geologist, 1027 Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, the Central Standard Mining Company, near Provo, Utah, is driving two headings on the 1,200 level, one to the west and the other to the southwest. The objective of the former is an iron fissure struck on the 1,000 level and should be reached in another 300 feet. Thomas Pierpont, 504 Dooly Building, Salt Lake City, is president and manager of the company.
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Judge Tillman D. Johnson of the federal court has decided the question of ownership in the case of R. L. Barnhill against the Ophir Mono Mines, Inc., in favor of the mining company. The dispute was over the two Magnolia claims in the Ophir-Dry Canyon District in Utah. Barnhill’s claim was for $1,500,000. M. C. Godbe, McCornick Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager of the company. Fourteen men are employed in setting up a two-story bunkhouse and getting the surface plant in condition for intensive work during the winter.
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Directors of the North Lily Mining Company, J. S. Finlay, superintendent, Eureka, Utah, have announced that the fourth quarterly dividend will be disbursed on October 23. Payment will be 25 cents a share, totaling $198,887.50.
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The Bonanza Mining Company, A. P. Lofquist, Lark, Utah, is ready to make shipments on regular schedule. The ore body on the 505 level, is four feet wide, and assays taken across the face show 25 percent lead to the ton. Timbers and tracks are being put in on the 500 level to facilitate operations.
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Work is to be resumed at the property of the M. & M. Lead Company, Frank Paxton, president, Kanosh, Utah. Several tons of high-grade galena have been shipped and satisfactory development is anticipated.
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During the past nine months 3,500 tons of manganese ore have been shipped from the Black Boy Mine, to the Columbia Steel Co.’s plant at Ironton, Utah. The remaining months of the year, it is believed, will see an additional 2,000 tons shipped. The Black Boy is in the Drum District, 40 miles west of Delta, Utah. Mining in that district has been continued a number of years, but only in recent months has it been successful.
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Late in August, work was discontinued in the Daly West group of claims in the West Tintic, or Sheeprocks District in Utah, according to Louis Schoenberger of Joy, via Abraham, Utah. The mine includes 19 claims and a one-third intere8t is held by Mr. Schoenberger, Tony Ferkovich and the late Frank Sersisko. The Park Utah Mining Company has cut many cross fissures in extending its main tunnel 6,000 feet northeasterly, some of them showing good values in lead and silver. There is a good wagon road up Hart-to-Beat Canyon, to the mine, which is equipped with substantial buildings and good water.
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The Combined Metals Reduction Company, E. H. Snyder, general manager, Stockton, Utah, intends to install additional flotation machinery in its mill at Bauer, Utah. This plant is three units, and has a combined capacity of 520 tons daily. About 150 men are employed in the mill. At Pioche, Nevada, another 150 men are employed, and arrangements are being made for shaft sinking. R. A. Campbell is mine superintendent at Stockton and L. G. Thomas is mine superintendent at Pioche.
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A new electric hoisting plant and compressor are to be installed at the Little May shaft, according to Mine Superintendent N. B. Crawford, Box 77, Eureka, Utah. Four men are engaged in underground work and exploration is being continued on the South Standard lease.
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The Utah Apex Mining Company, J. A. Norden, manager, Bingham, Utah, has declared a dividend of 25 cents a share, payable November 1, to stock of record October 15, 1929. Satisfactory settlement has been made with the government for taxer, for 1923. Ore assaying from 4.5 to 14 percent copper, with 6 ounces silver, has been opened on the 3,100-foot level of the company’s property, but its extent is not known yet. The shaft is being sunk to the 3,300 foot level, in the belief that the ore extends above and below the 3,100 level. A great deal of exploration work has been done during the past year, and the costs of this work have been met from operating profits. The working capital is more than one and one-half million dollars.
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The Tintic Standard Mining Company, E. J. Raddatz, president and general manager, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, has unwatered the lower work ings of the Iron King Mine and will re sume prospecting on the 1,600 level. Three pumps with a capacity of 200 gallons each are in the mine, but the present flow is only between 60 and 80 gallons per minute. Development of the 1,450 level will be continued.
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Cabins are being set up at Kamas, Utah, by the Kamas Gold Mining Company, N. A. Dunyon, president, 213 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, Utah, to do prospecting in a small way through the winter. Two headings are to be run from the lower tunnel to explore a showing of several years ago and which assayed as high as 6.95 ounces gold.
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The Fisk Ophir Mining Company, J. H. Marshall, general manager, 40 East Broadway, Salt Lake City, Utah, is mining ore, and storing it in the newly constructed bins for shipment. Samples of the ore assayed from 41 to 327 ounces silver and from 2.3 to 4.7 percent lead to the ton. Twenty-seven men are working. Willard Scowcroft of Ogden, Utah, is president of the company.
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The Georgia Lyn Mining Company plans to sink a two-compartment shaft to a depth of 1,000 feet in its property at Delle, Tooele County, Utah, and about one-half mile east of the present workings. A small production is being made in lead, silver and zinc, but most effort is expended on development. William R. Kone, 154 South McClellon Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah, is president and general manager of the company. Eleven men are working regularly.
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Financial arrangements are being made by the Union Chief Mining Company, O. L. Bemis, president and general manager, 208 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, to permit further exploration through three headings. The objective is the faulted segment of the ore bodies developed in the upper tunnel workings. Albert N. Larson, Box 63, Santaquin, Utah, is mine superintendent.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 11 30 1929

41
for NOVEMBER 30, 1929

UTAH

The Park Bingham Mining Company, E. R. Pembroke, president and manager, 210 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has retimbered its Silver Shield Shaft, and has installed an Ingersoll-Rand 500-cubic foot compressor, a Denver Gardner drill sharpener, an electric hoist and motors. No work has been done in the Butterfield Tunnel since October, except for four carload shipments made by lessees and some work done by the Bonanza Mining Company, which has a lease on 10 acres adjoining the United States Mine, from the Butterfield to the Niagara Tunnel Level. Exploration will be confined largely to a block of soluble limestone lying in the extreme northwest of the property.
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General Manager M. C. Godbe of the Ophir-Mono Mines, Inc., has returned from the East, where he has financed two shifts in the mine during the next year, and when enough ore is opened, a two-mile tramway from the mine, to the mouth of the canyon is to be built. Development is carried on through two drifts, one to the west to explore the Mono Bed, and the other to the north, in the main Dry Canyon fissure.
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The shaft of the Moscow Silver Mines Company, G. S. Wilkin, general manager, Milford, Utah, has entered the white limestone formation at a depth of 1,610 feet. Some water has been released, but not enough to interfere with development. The drift to the south, on the 1,100-foot level, shows mineralization in iron, maganese, talc and decomposed limestone. Leasers are mining good ore in the winze sunk below the 1,400-foot level, and two carloads of ore are ready for shipment.
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An assessment of 1/2 cent a share has been levied on the outstanding stock of the Glenwood Mining Company, payable to Treasurer N. W. Sonnedecker, 17 West First South Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. Date of delinquency is December 2, 1929.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company, which has recently purchased control of the Yankee Mines Company and other mines in the American Fork District, Utah, is considering building a tram from the Yankee, to Dutch Flat, to facilitate the hauling of ore, nine miles to American Fork. The tram will eliminate a difficult haul down the mountainside. Most of the winter will be spent in preparation for bigger work in the spring. R. F. McElvenny is western manager for American Smelting and Refining, and W. J. O’Connor is manager of the Utah plants. Headquarters are 700 McCornick Building, Salt Lake City.
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M. Chamberlain has started crosscutting, under contract, from the lower tunnel of the Monocco Mining Company, J. W. Jensen, superintendent, Gold Hill, Utah, to intersect four fissures parallel to that, on which present work is concentrated. The objective, about 400 feet below the glory hole, will require nearly 200 feet of work. Work is being done on company account also.
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The Raven Mining Company of Utah, is going to put in cement shafts at its property, near Roosevelt, Utah, according to Superintendent Fred C. Ferron. This company is producing elaterite and gilsonite, used in the manufacture of roofing, with a force of 26 employed. L. F. Lindley, Marquette Building, Chicago, is president of the company.
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The report of the Chief Consolidated Mining Company, operating in the Tintic District in Utah, covering the third quarter of this year, states that $6,025.58 net operating profit was realized. While this profit is considerably lower on account of the increased development in the Grand Central, and the Plutus mines, it shows a marked gain over that of the preceding quarter. New leads of ore have been found in both of these mines. According to Cecil Fitch, general manager, “The flotation section of the mill is handling a good portion of the product now coming from your mines and making a profit thereby; it is now treating about 150 tons per day, only a part of its capacity, this tonnage is too small to permit the working of the combined system of volatilization and flotation; but when the tonnage increases to something approaching its 500 tons capacity, the combined system will be put into operation and thus effect added profit.”
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Rather extensive developments have been outlined by the International Smelting Company, S. O. Elton, general manager, 818 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, for the Park Konold, the Park Premier, and the Victory properties, in the East Park City District, Utah. The objective of this work is to determine whether or not, great stopes of ore lie below the bleached rhyolite, as they do in the Tintic Standard property in the Tintic District. The Park Konold shaft, 865 feet deep, is to be enlarged to three compartments, and a double drum hoist installed. Actual sinking will probably not start before the spring. The Victory Tunnel has been driven about 1,000 feet northeasterly along the porphyry-limestone contact, and a crosscut is now being projected south through porphyry to prospect a fissure near Park Cummings ground.
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The Big Hill Mining Company, J. William Knight, president, Provo, Utah, has retimbered the first 100 feet of its shaft, in the Tintic District, and as soon as the work is finished, will continue sinking. Retimbering will probably take a month.
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Eastern men are said to have contracted to spend $562,500 in the development of the property of the Lion Hill Amalgamated Mining Company on Lion Hill, Ophir Canyon, Utah. The agreement provides for $500,000 within 10 months, and the remainder within two years. The Lion Hill Amalgamated, recently organized, has taken over 60 mining claims, including the Zella, the Lion Hill, the Banner, the McKinley, and other mines. The men backing this organization are: Heber C. Hicks, former director of the State Securities Commission, in Utah, president; Joseph H. Marshall, 40 East Broadway, Salt Lake City, vice-president and manager; Willard Scowcroft, vice-president and assistant manager; J. F. Quist, secretary and treasurer; Brigham Krause and Max Daniels. Extensive development of the Tiger, Zella, and other fissures has been planned.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company is said to have purchased the Silver Wave property, and taken an option on the Powers Group, in American Fork Canyon. The Silver Wave has been an
important producer during early operations, and has yielded some ore until recently. The Powers is in the development stage. American Smelting and Refining has started work at two places in the Lion Hill property of the Tintic Ophir Mining Company, where power lines and electric equipment have been installed and a boarding house constructed. During October, a drift was advanced 148 feet toward the objective limestone, and a raise driven 50 feet toward the same horizon.
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The Ohio Copper Company, H. A. Tobelmann, agent, Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has opened a body of pyrite on the 700-foot level, below the Mascotte Tunnel Level of its property at Bingham Canyon. This deposit is believed to indicate the near approach to the downward continuation of the old Brooklyn Stope, mined in adjoining ground, and which is the objective of the development. It is said that silver, gold and copper values are associated with the pyrite. The 700-foot level is 500 feet vertically below the Mascotte Tunnel and this is the deepest work on the east side of the camp. Output from the upper levels, by the leaching-in-place method of low-grade copper ores, is about 200,000 pounds a month.
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An assessment of 1 cent a share has been levied on the stock of the Howell Mining Company, owning property near Alta, Utah. Date of delinquency was November 15, 1929.
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The White King Mining Company has levied an assessment of 1 cent a share on its stock. Payment of the assessment was to be made on or before November 18, 1929, to Secretary George H. Taylor, 606 Scott Building, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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Ore is coming in on the top, bottom and sides of the crosscut, on the 125-foot level of the property of the Frisco Silver Lead Mining Company at Frisco, Utah, according to Foreman A. E. English. Both quantity and quality are improving noticeably as the drift advances. The Frisco Silver Lead company controls 125 acres, adjoining the famous Horn Silver Mine, which zone continues between 4,000 and 5,000 feet into Frisco ground.
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A syndicate of Kansas City, Kansas, men have taken over the Copper Boy Mine in eastern Utah, and are building a road to Cliff on the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, which is the nearest shipping point. The names of Dr. C. W. McLaughlin, Frank O. McCain, and William Leach, are mentioned in the project. Assays of the ore show high values in copper and silver.
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The bottom of a 85-foot winze sunk from the 400-foot level of the property of the Park Consolidated Mining Company, Park City, Utah, is in a full face of shipping ore, averaging 50 ounces silver to the ton. Shipments from the property average a carload a week, and return between 25 and 80 ounces silver with some lead values. Most of the development is directed towards exploring the vein system on the 400-foot level, and several fissures have been exposed in the quartzite. These are being prospected for replacement beddings in the limestone. J. J. Beeson, 502 Scott Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager.
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The Park Monarch Mining Company, recently organized, has taken over the Mint Lode Mining Claims, Nos. 1 to 54, in the Park City District, Utah. Officers of the company are Dominick Bums, president; W. H. Kershaw, vice-president, and Guy M. Snyder, secretary and treasurer.
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The Sun mining claims, Nos. 1 to 45, near Park City, Utah, have been transferred to the Park Sun Mining Company, Harry E. Rose is president of this organization; Paul C. Lyon, vice-president, and
G. M. Snyder, secretary-treasurer.
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The Park Apex Mining Company has been organized with the following officers:
Paul C. Lyon, president; A. L. Burns, vice-president, and Guy M. Snyder, secretary-treasurer. This new company has taken over the Bonus Claims, 1 to 22; the Little Rom, 1 to 11; the Silver Peaks, 1 to 14, and the Bank, 1 to 26. Capital stock is 1,500,000 shares of 10 cents par.
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N. W. Roberts, superintendent of the Iron King Mine at Eureka, Utah, is mining iron ore from open cuts above the main tunnel level, and shipping it to the plant of the Columbia Steel Corporation, near Provo. Already about 3,280 tons have been shipped to the Columbia Steel plant, and production averages six to eight carloads a month.
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The International Smelting Company, J. O. Elton, manager, 818 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is repairing its Yankee Consolidated Shaft at Eureka, preparatory to developing that portion of its mineral ground easily reached from the shaft. This shaft has been sunk to a depth of 2,000 feet.
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During the first nine months of the current year, the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, reports a consolidated net profit of $3,516,208, after interest, depreciation, depletion, amortization and federal taxes, equivalent after dividend requirements on 7 per cent preferred stock, to $3.90 a share on 574,723 shares of common stock outstanding. During the corresponding period in 1928, the company earned $2,642,052, or $3.89 a share on 851,115 shares of common stock.
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The North Lily Knight Company, J. O. Elton, manager, 818 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has started retimbering the Big Hill Shaft, following which, will continue it from below the 600-foot level to a depth of 1,500 feet. At the lower point, it is planned to explore some of the most promising undeveloped ground in the eastern Tintic District.
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The directors of the Columbia Steel Corporation, recently purchased by the United States Steel Corporation, have called for redemption on January 1, 1930, all of the outstanding preferred stock, and will pay to the holders thereof, $105 a share, plus all dividends, at the rate of 7 per cent a year accrued, or in arrears. Redemption will be made on or after January 1, 1930, at the company’s offices, 615 Matson Building, San Francisco, California.
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The Martin Syndicate, Eureka, Utah, has received its steam shovel, and is making good progress in installing a 1,700-cubic foot compressor and a 30 x 100-foot three-story boarding house. Under the supervision of Dave Cavagnaro, a tunnel, 9x12 feet, is being driven. Its objective will require a tunnel length of approximately 9,060 feet.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 8 15 1931

UTAH

As is frequently the case, the Utah Bunker Hill Mining Company has opened a vein of zinc ore while developing the lead strike in the tunnel, or 725 level, in its property in Miners’ Canyon, not far from Grantsville, Utah. It strikes to the right of the tunnel where the lead ore lies and is entirely separate, thus simplifying milling and smelting, as the ore can be sorted and shipped without separation. So far, the assays that have been run show an average of 71 per cent lead, from 15 to 46 ounces silver and from $2 to $4 in gold. John V. Long, 425 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager.

Negotiations are in progress by which the Colorado Consolidated Mines Company, a subsidiary of the Tintic Standard Mining Company, may acquire a block of stock in the Sioux Mines Company. The Sioux and Colorado own adjoining properties in the Tintic district, but both are idle now. E. F. Birch of Eureka, Utah, president and general manager of the Sioux, has levied an assessment of 1 cent a share, and with the funds he expects to liquidate an indebtedness and resume operations.

The Utah Fire Clay Company of Salt Lake City, Utah, is transferring its machinery from a silica deposit at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon to a quartzite deposit in the Tintic district, near Eureka, Utah. The material will be mined and hauled out over a 700-foot spur now under construction by the Union Pacific Railroad. It will be crushed twice and mixed with limestone to help bind it; wet and shaped into bricks; allowed to dry; and then burned. Utah Fire Clay has furnished the lining for the new smelter chimney of the Nevada Consolidated Copper Company at McGill, and others.

The drift on the 600-foot level of the Emerald Mining Company at Mammoth, Utah, is getting close to the Sioux-Ajax fault zone, which has been highly productive in adjoining properties, according to 0. W. Crane, geologist, 304 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City. This drift is being advanced southerly and its face is nearly 1,000 feet from the shaft. Not far back it opened a secondary iron formation and this will be explored after the drift undercuts certain ledges showing at the surface and which are the objective of the drift.

Development during the month of June by the Century Consolidated Gold Mining Company has added approximately 10,000 tons of millable ore to the volume of reserves. Most of the development is being done in a southwest drift from the Susannah tunnel and its face shows a six-foot width of ore, that yields an average of $19.60 a ton. Gold is the principal mineral. John C. Stewart, Park Valley, via Kelton, Utah, is mine superintendent.

The Utah Gold Company, John Bestelmeyer, manager, Box 20, II. F. D. No. 2, Provo, Utah, has completed its assay office at the mine, north of Beaver, and financial arrangements have been made to sink the shaft another 100 feet, which will put the workings down near the 800-foot level. It is believed that the extension of the shaft will cut the vein that is being opened in the drift as the vein is sloping towards the shaft.

Some good showings in gold ore have been opened in the property of the Oak Leaf Gold Mining Company, near Beaver, Utah, which has been under development for two years, according to Manager Wheatley. An 808-foot tunnel has been in good quartz, that carries close to $20 in gold, for the last 30 feet and has broken into a Buckskin lime with an eight-foot vein that will run between $85 and $40 a ton in gold. On an adjoining claim, a three-foot vein of manganese ore that assays close to $25 in gold has been opened at shallow depth.

Mining and shipping have been suspended and only a few men are getting ready for capacity production at the Yankee mines of the American Smelting and Refining Company in Mary Ellen Gulch, near American Fork, Utah, while the tramway is being constructed. It is being built by the Riblet Tramway Company of Spokane, which has engineered some of the most difficult construction in tramways that is known. Supplies are trucked up the canyon to the lower terminal and from there are being delivered to the point of use ahead by “pioneer drive,” meaning that the tramway does its own hauling from the lower end upwards. The lower terminal at Deer Creek is at an altitude of 6,200 feet. It will climb over the ridge between Major Evans and Mary Ellen Gulches, at an altitude of 10,500 feet, and descend to the Yankee mines at 9,200 feet. The job wilt be completed this fall and will eliminate five miles of steep grade, which is blocked in winter by snow and is dangerous to travel.

The Seven Fissure Veins Mining Company, Frederick Crowton, Jr., president and general manger, 514 Sixth Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah, is pushing development of a vein opened at the 450-foot point in its main tunnel. The vein has been followed 200 feet and is about eight feet wide. Samples at the 150-foot point assayed 5 per cent copper, 7 ounces silver, and $1.50 in gold. At the 165 and 180-foot points assays were made for the gold content only and ran $3.50 and $5.50 a ton, respectively. Even stronger mineralization is expected at the intersection with the cross vein, only a few feet ahead. It is planned to follow the crossvein to its intersection with a vein opened at the 800-foot point in the main tunnel.

The Marysvale Gold Mining Company, Claude Kenyon, mine superintendent, Marysvale, Utah, is getting assays ranging from .4 ounces to as high as 27.9 ounces silver and from $1.60 to $60.40 gold in the drift from the 400-foot point in the lower tunnel. The drift has been advanced 165 feet along a strong fissure and its objective is to get below the workings where high-grade ore was mined a few years ago.

The Silver Contact Mining Company has contracted with B. C. Oglesby to carry on development in its property in American Fork Canyon, about 26 miles south of Salt Lake City, Utah. The work was started where it left off last fall on a gold-silver showing in the incline shaft and most of the attention will be given to developing the gold content in the ore. It is also planned to do some work in the upraise from the face of the main tunnel. H. P. Huey, 26 Exchange Building, Salt Lake City, is president and general manager.
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GOLD HILL UTAH WORD POST TMJ 8 30 1931


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FRISCO UTAH REVIVAL TMJ 6 15 1930

FRISCO CAMP LOOKS FORWARD TO REVIVAL OF ITS HEYDAY

Mining activity in the Frisco District, in Beaver County, Utah, is progressing at an unusually rapid rate, which presages a bright future in the production of lead, zinc and copper ores. Development on the 1,000 Level, of the Hornsilver Mine, of the Tintic Lead Company, has proven the downward extension of the original orebody, which produced nearly $54,000,000 worth of ore, from an area 1,000 feet by 300 feet, and mined to a depth of 800 feet. The drift on the 1,000 Level, has reached bunches of zinc oxide, which indicate leachings from the sulphide ore bodies immediately above.

Last month, 594 feet of development work was completed, confined mostly to the 900 and 1,000 levels. On the 900 Level, seven stopes are being mined, and the 500, 700 and 800 levels are producing also. Several tons of ore are being placed in sight for every ton mined, and shipments run between 12 and 15 carloads weekly. Development of the 928 Stope, has shown that the ore is 28 feet long and 18 feet wide, with the drills still in ore and average assays run 8 percent copper, 5.5 percent lead, and 20 ounces silver, to the ton.

The American Smelting and Refining Company has started work on the Frisco Lulu Property, acquired recently, and which adjoins the Hornsilver. Fifteen men are working there, putting up plant buildings, installing a gallows frame, electric hoist, compressor, and other equipment, and laying water lines.

Mining will start as soon as the equipment has been installed, and power connection established. It is understood that the first underground work will be from the 200 and 400-foot levels of the 700-foot shaft, and will be continued to the west, into the limestone area from which the Tintic Lead Company has produced 23,000 tons of ore, since starting production 14 months ago.
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OPHIR HILL UTAH WORD POST TMJ 3 30 1931


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SILVER KING MINES PARK CITY UT WORD POST TMJ 22831


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UTAH METAL PROD 1937 WORD POST TMJ 1 30 1938


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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 1 15 1930

UTAH

During December, $18,240,053 was disbursed as dividends from mines in the State of Utah. The largest contributor was the Utah Copper Company, which paid $12,995,960 as a quarterly and extra dividend, each of $4 a share.
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The Silver Shield Mining and Milling Company, Enoch Newman, superintendent, Box 895, Eureka, Utah, is setting up buildings to house its machinery, at the Copper Jack Property, and is installing a 50-horsepower gasoline engine to furnish power for the new compressor. The Copper Jack Property has a good showing of low-grade copper ore, but former development was hindered on account of water. The tunnel being driven has reached a length of 500 feet, and should soon reach a point vertically below the old workings, and unwater about 150 feet of ground. Pumps will probably be installed to work the ground on the 100 and 200 levels, below the tunnel. Jericho is the loading point for ore from the mine, and Eureka is the point of supply.
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The directors of the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, have declared a dividend of 87½ cents a share on both the preferred and the common stock, payable January 15 to stock of record December 31. There were 351,115 shares of common stock outstanding at the beginning of 1929, and in January, 219,447 shares were issued for cash. A part of the proceeds were used in the retirement of $8,000,000, 5 ¼ percent debentures. In July, 50,000 additional shares were issued in the purchase of the Bingham Mines Property. Preferred dividend requirements for the year are $1,702,225 and it is estimated that net earnings for the year will exceed this amount by $3,047,775.
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The Arrowhead Metal Mining Company, T. C. Wright, manager, Leamington, Utah, has levied an assessment of 1 cent a share, to supplement its operating fund in meeting the cost of defending legal action, involving title to some of its claims. This is the first assessment that has been levied by the company.
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The power plant, installed by the American Metal Mining Company, Thomas Hobday, president and manager, 246 South Main Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, is giving satisfaction, and is saving about $2.50 a foot in the cost of driving the tunnel. This tunnel was contracted to Mr. Erickson for 200 feet, at $10 a foot, and power was to have been furnished by the Howell Mine, but the management there decided that it required all of the power for its own work. Cost of the plant was $2,094.79, and the recent assessment of 14 cent a share, is to pay off a part of the expense incurred in the building of this plant. The tunnel is in lime rock, showing iron stains.
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Carbonate ore has been opened in the Tarbaby and Kennebec Lease, of the Howell Mining Company, T. L. Walden, manager, 209 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. The South Drift, on the lime-quartzite contact has been in decomposed lime for the last 50 feet, and shows some replacement in ore values. Supplies and materials are on hand to carry the work through the winter, and six miners are employed. Keith Buck is mine foreman and Con O’Neil is acting in consulting capacity.
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The Little May Mining Company, N. B. Crawford, superintendent, Box 77, Eureka, Utah, has advanced the Rothchild Tunnel, in the South Standard Lease, 956 feet, and is cutting a station there from which diamond drills will operate. Gold, silver and copper values have been increasing steadily in the No. 1 Drift, which has been advanced 47 feet towards the Iron Blossom Fault. This is about half the distance to the objective, but present indications are that the ore will be reached, before reaching the fault. The No. 2 Drift has been driven 28 feet, and its face is in rhyolite, mineralized in gold and silver.
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Although the objective of development of the Moscow Silver Mine Company, C. S. Wilkin, general manager, Milford, Utah, is the 1,700 Level, recent developments on the 1,565 Level, make it profitable to do some work there. The showing has been drifted on 100 feet, and three carloads of ore have been shipped, while three or four other shipments are either in the bins, or in transit. The first carload assayed 26 percent lead, with some silver; the second assayed 25 percent lead, with an increase in silver content. The ore contains about 28 percent iron, low silica values, and no sulphur or zinc, and is therefore a desirable smelting ore. A drift is being run southwest on the 1,600 Level to further develop the ore.
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Assessment No. 28 has been levied on the stock of the Three Kings Consolidated Mining Company, Cameron McKay, superintendent, Park City, Utah. Payment is to be made at the rate of 1 cent a share, on or before January 24, 1980.
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The Provo Mining Company has levied assessment No. 8, on its stock, at the rate of 1 cent a share, payable on or before January 25, 1930. Payment is to be made to James W. Wade, secretary, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 1 30 1930

for JANUARY 30, 1930

UTAH

The North Standard Mining Company, John Dorius, general manager, 412 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has completed a winze to the 1,300-foot level of its property, near Eureka, and expects to reach a point 100 feet below a cave, on the 1,200 level, in another 30 feet of drifting to the northwest. This heading is already 35 feet from the winze. The combination of heat and gas, render steady progress impossible. This cave is believed to have been caused by shrinkage of an ore body below, and has perfectly domed walls. It is dry, and on the floor are slabs, that are presumed to have fallen off the walls. Mike McPolin is superintendent of the work at Eureka.
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Assessment No. 12 has been levied on the stock of the Tintic Coalition Mine. Company, payable at the rate of ½ cent a share. Date of delinquency was January 11, 1980.
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The North Lily Mining Company, J. S. Finlay, superintendent, Eureka, Utah, disbursed a dividend of 15 cents a share on January 23, to stockholders of record, January 16, 1930. During 1929, the company paid four dividends of 25 cents each, and the lower figure is on account of lower revenue, brought about largely by trouble with water on the 700 Level. More than a million dollars have been paid in dividends since the original strike about two years ago.
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At a point 230 feet below its 400 Level, the winze being sunk by the Park City Consolidated Mining Company entered two feet of high-grade ore in quartzite formation. Assays of the showing revealed 60 cents in gold, 117.4 ounces silver, 2.8 percent lead, and 20 percent zinc to the ton. Another showing on the 400 Level is being stoped. J. J. Beeson, 502 Scott Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company is driving a tunnel in the Yankee Mines, at American Fork, Utah, to provide a more economical means of removing ore developed under former management. This adit has reached a length of about 125 feet, and will require another 850 feet, to reach its objective. The work is being done under contract.
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The entire night shift of the Utah Copper Company at Bingham Canyon, Utah, was laid off, on account of over production of copper. This action will result in a decrease in production of between 25 and 30 percent. Approximately 200 men were thrown out of employment.
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The Silver King Coalition Mines Company, M. j. Dailey, general manager, Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, has nearly completed the installation of some new machinery at its property, near Park City. The equipment includes a 120-foot Dorr traction thickener, and a new pumping system.
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The ore opened in the Kearsarge Incline, in the early part of December, 1929, gives all indications of permanency, according to N. G. Morgan, 804 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, president of the Kearsarge Standard Mining Company. This incline extends 1,450 feet from the surface in a northerly direction, and during the late fall months, was being cleaned out, and extended, under the direction of David B. Loughran, geologist for the International Smelting Company. The new strike is five feet thick. As yet, considerable calcite is mixed in the ore, but the ore is becoming richer and larger as depth is being gained.
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Ten carloads of high-grade ore were shipped from ore bodies on the fourth and fifth levels of the Park Galena mine at Keetley, Utah. A force of 16 men are developing the ground, under the supervision of L. F. Pearce. Some old stopes in the ground are being opened, and it is hoped that ore will be developed in a number of them.
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According to T. G. Wright, manager of the Arrowhead Metal Mining Company, Leamington, Utah, about 14 tons of high-grade lead ore have been mined, and between one and two tons of ore, are being added daily to this tonnage. It is expected that the second shipment will be made soon. The source of the ore, is a drift on a showing, in the incline shaft. More than 600 feet of underground work is said to have been done, and the property equipped with machinery.
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The report of the Utah Apex Mining Company, j. A. Norden, general manager, Bingham Canyon, Utah, for the fiscal year ended August 31, 1929, shows earnings amounting to the equivalent of 27 cents a share, as compared with 12 cents a share, during the preceding 12 months. Utah Apex owns approximately 820 acres of mineral land, and is one of the largest producers of lead and zinc ore, and a considerable producer of gold, silver, and copper. The deep development of a showing of 14 percent copper, and 6 ounce silver ore, on the 3,100 level, is encouraging.
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Stockholders of the Silver Wave Mining Company received a dividend of 6 cents a share on January 2, 1930.
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The Utah Delaware Mining Company, and the Utah Metals and Tunnel Company, both operating at Bingham Canyon, Utah, have reduced their working forces by 60 percent, and discontinued the mining of zinc and lead ores. This action affects about 800 men, and is explained by the low prices for lead, zinc, and silver. Both of these properties are operated by the International Smelting Company, a subsidiary of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, and are relatively small copper producers.
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The Tintic Standard Mining Company, E. j. Raddatz, president and general manager, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is churn drilling unproven ground in the eastern Tintic District. To date, seven holes, with eight to 12-inch casings, have a combined footage of over 9,100 feet. The shortest hole is 608 feet, and the longest 1,961 feet. Some deep diamond drilling has been done by Tintic Standard, but it is understood that the geological data revealed, was not entirely satisfactory.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company has exercised its option on the controlling block of stock, in the East Utah Mining Company at Park City, Utah. According to A. H. Means, manager of the exploration department of American Smelting and Refining, 616 McCornick Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, an extensive geophysical survey, and geological examination, has been made of East Utah ground, and development is to start immediately. The nature of the work has not been announced.
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Twenty mining claims, three miles south of Levan, Juab County, Utah, have been taken over by the newly organized Juab Mines Company, headed by B. B. Erwin, formerly president of the Erwin Motor Company, 777 South State Street, Salt Lake City. Associates in the organization are N. L. Stewart, vice-president; George L. Nelson, secretary-treasurer; S. D. Trotter and W. B. Gain, additional directors.
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The Alta Tiger Mining Company has taken over the property of the West Mountain Development Company, comprising four patented claims, and four claims under state lease, in the south Bingham District, and directly south of the property of the Utah Metals and Tunnel Company, from which about $75,000,000 is said to have been mined. G. B. Doyle, Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is president of the Alta Tiger Company, and Lester Rankin is secretary and treasurer. Timber and water are available for development. The ground is equipped with a compressor, compressor house, blacksmith shop, and bunkhouse, and additional buildings are to be erected. Two shifts are to be engaged, to continue the lower tunnel to the downward extension of a 32-foot width of ore, assaying from $10 to $70 a ton in gold, silver, lead and zinc, as revealed in the upper tunnel.
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Exclusive of development work performed in its parent property, the Chief Consolidated Mining Company performed a total of 23,554 feet of work, during the first 11 months of 1929. While actual cost of the work has not been determined, it is estimated to be about $11 a foot. Most of this development, represented by about 10,237 feet, was performed in the Flutes Property, while the Tintic Bullion, the Grand Central, the Eureka Lily, the Eureka Bullion, and the Eureka Hill mines shared in the program. Cecil Fitch, 608 Dooly Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is general manager of the company.
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The Mineral Veins Coalition Mines Company, A. 0. Jacobson, general manager, 1118 Newhouse Building, Salt lake City, has completed its mill building, and laboratories, at the portal of the Wasatch Drain Tunnel in the Alta District. Machinery to carry out the flotation process of treatment is being installed and it is planned to have the first unit of the mill in operation, in February. Additional units are planned for the year. Production to date is $9,300,000 from above the drain tunnel, which will unwater the old workings, and permit development to greater depth. A new program of development has been outlined.
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Three carloads of concentrates have been shipped from the new flotation plant of the Big Indian Copper Company, in San Juan County, Utah. The plant was designed by Thomas Varley, metallurgist, 453 South Tenth East Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, and is being operated by his associate, J. Benjamin Parker. Recoveries average from 70 to 75 percent, and the concentrate carries 34, and 85, percent copper. The ore, a replacement of sandstone, carries its values in oxidized form, with some metallic copper, and is being mined from open cuts. Preston 0. Peterson, Provo, Utah, is secretary and manager.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 6 15 1930

NOTE: MISSING ISSUES FROM 2/30 TO 5/30

THE MINING JOURNAL

UTAH

The South Tintic Mines Company, organized by B. O. Dobbs, is making preparations to prospect a group of 66 lode claims, on the left fork of Government Canyon, nine miles southwest of Elberta, Utah. Four well-defined fissures, the Crescent, Star, Buckhorn, and Midas, have been located on the ground, and these will be explored by the use of drills. A site has been selected for a tunnel, that will allow economical prospecting of the four fissures. Elberta is the nearest shipping point.
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On account of the condition of the copper market, the Silver Shield Mining and Milling Company has suspended shipments of ore from its Copper Jack Mine in the West Tintic District. More than 25,000 tons of ore are developed in this mine, a new ore bin just been completed and machinery is on the ground for a gravity concentrator. At the Independence Group, adjoining the Tintic Standard Property, the shaft has been sunk 1,250 feet and is being continued in a mineralized formation. Enoch Newman, Box 895, Eureka, Utah, is superintendent of operations.
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The Utah Copper Company has increased production about 70 carloads, or 8,500 tons, above its average daily production of 30,000 tons, according to the report of shipments for the week ended May 23, 1930. The increase is the result of a better demand for copper. During the same week the shipments reported from the Bingham District by other companies were: United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, 111 carloads; Bingham Prospect, 5 carloads; Ohio Copper Company, 4 carloads; Utah Apex Mining Company, 11 carloads; Park Bingham Mining Company, 1 carload; Utah Delaware Mining Company, 1,800 tons; and Utah Metal and Tunnel Company, 200 tons. These shipments represent an increase over those of the preceding week. During the same week the Tintic District shipped 125 carloads of ore, and the Park City District was third, in point of production with a total shipment of 4,355 tons.
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The Kennecott Copper Company has reduced its dividend from an annual rate of $5 a share to an annual rate of $3 a share, and, accordingly, will disburse its quarterly dividend at the rate of 75 cents a share. Its subsidiary, the Utah Copper Company, has reduced its dividend rate from $16 to $8 a share annually, and will pay its quarterly dividend at the rate of $2 a share. A similar cut has been announced in the Nevada Consolidated Copper Company, which has reduced its annual rate from $3 a share to $1.50, and will disburse its quarterly payment at the rate of 37 cents a share. Kennecott will pay its quarterly dividend on July 1, to stock of record June 12, 1930, and Utah Copper and Nevada Consolidated will pay their dividends on June 30, to stock of record June 13, 1930.
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The directors of the Tintic Standard Mining Company have declared a quarterly dividend of 20 cents a share, payable June 28, to stock of record June 17, 1930, but have omitted the usual extra dividend of 20 cents a share. This extra dividend had been paid regularly since 1925, and its omission is probably on account of the prevailing low metal prices. The 20-cent disbursement will amount to $230,668 and brings the grand total of dividends paid to date to $18,363,905. Tintic Standard has suspended work at its Iron Blossom, and Colorado, Mines, thus affecting about 40 men.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company has ordered a 370-cubic foot compressor, and an electric hoist for the Frisco Lulu Mine, immediately south of the Hornsilver Mine in Beaver County, Utah, according to A. H. Means, manager of the Western Mining Department, 616 McCornick Building, Salt Lake City. The smelting company acquired control of this company recently and, although no definite program of development has been outlined, it is understood that the work will center in exploring the limestone sheared zone, which is proving so productive in the adjoining Hornsilver Mine.
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The new retort system designed and installed by Paul W. Webster of New York City, at the property of the Utah Sulphur Industries, at Sulphurdale, Utah, is ready to start work. This is the first plant of its kind to be built, and Mr. Webster has been giving his personal attention to its in
stallation. Should it work out satisfactorily, other units will be installed.
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The churn drilling program of the Tintic Standard Mining Company, which has been in progress during the past eight months, has come to an end. More than 10,000 feet of holes were drilled and valuable geological data learned. An eight and a quarter inch water column is to be installed in one of the holes drilled to a depth of 1,200 feet near the main shaft. This will ultimately be connected with the 1,400 level of the main shaft, and pumps installed on the 800, and 1,400 levels. This is a unique method of effecting a precaution against an unexpected flow of water. B. J. Raddatz, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is president and general manager of the Tintic Standard.
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The Sioux Mines Company, B. F. Birch, manager, Eureka, Utah, is driving from the 1,914 Level of the Colorado Shaft, of the Tintic Standard Mining Company, to explore the downward extension of a promising quartz formation, exposed in the Upper Sioux workings. The heading is nearing its objective. Development is financed from an assessment of ½ cent a share, which it is believed will also relieve the company’s current indebtedness.
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B. J. Raddatz, president and general manager of the Tintic Standard Mining Company, has moved a drilling outfit to the Raddatz Group of mining claims, in the Tintic District, east of the North Standard Mine. This ground is owned personally by Mr. Raddatz, and considerable prospecting is scheduled.
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The Gold Coin Mining Company, J. T. Fern, general manager, Modena, Utah, is mining and milling about 60 tons of ore, in its flotation mill, during 24 hours. Development is in progress with the objective of increasing the milling capacity. The ore is heavily oxidized, quartz, and heavy colloidal clay, containing iron, and manganese oxide and dioxide. The gold is free, and finely divided, but liberated from the gangue at about 80 mesh. The small amount of silver in the ore is in the form of chloride and iodide. In milling the gold, recovery is exceeding 95 percent, and the silver 85 percent. Sulphidizing agents are used to good advantage. The ratio of concentration is about 85 to one. Mr. Fern plans to cyanide the concentrate in the near future.
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The Beaver Copper Company, A. J. McMullan, manager, Milford, Utah, intends to build an engine house, compressor house, and shops. The company has built 1,000 feet of roadway to the tunnel, and changed the location of the plant to tunnel operations. The company intends to drift east and west, along the fissure on the 230-foot Level of the winze, which has been sunk 400 feet below the surface, in the lead-silver section of the property.
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The Ophir Midland Mining Company has been incorporated to operate mining property between the Ophir Hill Consolidated mines, formerly owned by the Clark interests, and the Fisk Ophir holdings in the Ophir District in Tooele County, Utah. The Ophir Midland covers the same class of lime and shale beds, so productive in the Clark Property, and financial arrangements have been made to go ahead with the work. A shaft, sunk in adjoining property, will be used in development and it is understood that they will ultimately acquire the claim in which the shaft has been sunk. The Midland officers are: Heber C. Hicks, 79 Wall Street, New York City, president; J. H. Marshall, 501 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, first vice-president; Willard Scowcroft, second vice-president; J. W. Gebhart, secretary, and Wallace T. Rynearson, treasurer.
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George T. Smith of Salt Lake City, Utah, and others, are organizing the Deer Lodge Mining Company, to develop the old Oak Property, in Three Mile Canyon, south of Brigham City. Some high-grade ore, carrying lead, silver, copper, and gold, has been opened, and it is believed that additional depth will reveal important ore. Mr. Smith is one of the chief owners of the claims.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company is said to have given up its option on the Tintic Ophir Property, and has turned over its machinery to the company at a reasonable price. Four lessees are said to have started work, carrying out the development outlined by the smelt ing company, and two others are negotiating for working easements in the property. J. B. Walker, 4 American Building, Salt Lake City, is president of the Tintic Ophir.
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The Maxfield, the Bullion, and the Treasure Mines, in Big Cottonwood Canyon, near Alta, Utah, are said to have been taken over by a new organization, known as the Bullion Chief Mining Company. The total acreage is about 1,650, and the Maxfield is already in operation, under the management of Lloyd Hoskins, 1486 South Sixteenth East Street, Salt Lake City, formerly in charge of the property.
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The ore body opened some time ago on the 1,200 Level of the United States Mine, in Bingham Canyon, Utah, has been proven to a length of 240 feet, and is from eight to 16 feet wide. The strike is a new body of ore, and is one of the most important discoveries made in a long time. It is of commercial shipping grade, in contrast with the bulk of ore, mined in recent years, and which has been of milling value. The same deposit has been opened on the 1,000 Level, and a drift has been started at the 800 Level to explore its upward trend.
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Eureka, Utah, business men have called a meeting to consider establishing a highway from the North Lily Mine, to Dividend, the camp of the Tintic Standard Mining Company, which would open a new route from Eureka, to Utah County, and aid the miners in getting from their homes to their places of employment. The proposed work would be done by Utah County. C. E. Huish is president of the businessmen’s association and it is understood that they intend raising about $2,000.
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An organization headed by Joseph B. Murdock, Hiram F. Crockett, I. A. Smoot, Nathaniel Baldwin and A. C. Wardel, has been formulated to work ground adjoining the Annie Laurie Property, southwest of Sevier, Utah. The organization is known as the Gold Mountain Mines Company. Development will be started shortly.
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The Utah Construction Company at Salt Lake City, Utah, has awarded the contract to build a mile of railroad spur, to the mines of the Park City Consolidated Mining Company, from the landing in Deer Valley, of the Union Pacific and the Denver and Rio Grande Western railways. Nearly all of the material for the job is on the ground, and will be installed as soon as the condition of the weather permits. The contract calls for completion by July 1, 1930.
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The Howell Mining Company has moved the compressor at the Tar Baby Property, to the portal of the Howell Tunnel, which will facilitate development work, according to Superintendent J. W. Buck. These mines are in the Big Cottonwood District, about 30 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, Utah. T. L. Walden, 209 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager of the Howell.
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The Utah Rock Asphalt Company is milling about 500 tons of material daily from its quarries, near Sunnyside, Utah, and has 60 men on its payroll. Last year 260 carloads of asphalt were shipped to Utah, California, Wyoming, Iowa, Illinois, Idaho and New Mexico, for use in road building, and the output this year is expected to be double that of last year. It is said that the entire mountain is one solid mass of rock asphalt, 2,000 feet thick, and probably 10 miles long, and a complete laboratory has been established to test the rock. The asphalt is conveyed to the mill over a three and one-half mile tramway, loaded on trucks, and hauled one and one-half miles to the mill, where it is crushed and loaded directly on railroad cars for shipment. C. N. Power, 732 Thatcher Building, Pueblo, Colorado, is president and general manager of the concern.
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The Utah Power and Light Company is building a power line from Eureka, to the Tintic Standard Mine, in the eastern end of the district. The line is to insure uninterrupted service for the mines in the Tintic District.
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UTAH ORE SAMPLING PLANT, MURRAY, UT TMJ 6 30 1930

for JUNE 30, 1930


New Unit of the Utah Sampling Co.

By GAIL MARTIN, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Representing the best in modern practice, the Utah Ore Sampling Company has erected its new unit at Murray, Utah.


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Realizing the importance of true and accurate sampling, particularly when the purchase of thousands or millions of dollars of ore, is controlled by the result, the Utah Ore Sampling Company has spared no pains or expense in erecting its new unit at Murray, Utah. As an independent sampler of ore, the Utah Ore Sampling Company, during its 20 years of activity, has seen the business evolve from where it had plants situated at various camps, to one where all sampling is done at one central plant, now at Murray.

The company has also witnessed many mechanical changes in its equipment. Its first sampling plants were of the vertical, elevator type, necessitating the elevating of the ore to the top floor. Crushing machinery was generally placed high up in the structure, which resulted in considerable vibration, and complicated operations. Bucket elevators were used and much of the sampling done by gravity. Present day practice favors the lower, and more spread-out type of building. Belt conveyors, more simply cleaned, have been substituted. Heavy machinery can be placed closer to the ground, making possible the building of a firm foundation, for less money, and eliminating vibration.

Because of the care with which a sampler must be erected and equipped, to insure accurate sampling, building of this type of plant is much more expensive than that of the ordinary flotation plant. In the design and construction of its new plant of 125 tons hourly capacity, the Utah Ore Sampling Company has taken care to provide the proper facilities for cleanliness, proper reduction in size before sampling, and extreme accuracy in cutting, and handling the sample. To obtain the maximum efficiency in each of these steps, every facility has been supplied that will promote easy cleaning and maintenance of the crushing, conveying, feeding and cutting machinery, and that will permit close observation and inspection of the material as it passes through the plant.

Special attention has been given to conveyor slopes, delivery of material to and from conveyors, and the mechanical cleaning of belts. Interlocked electrically driven apparatus operates conveying and crushing machinery. Reinforced concrete has been used throughout, in the construction of the building. Bins, hoppers, chutes, and machinery supports, are of structural steel. Special facilities have been provided for cleaning up of the railroad track between the unloading hopper and the track scales. After the ore is sampled, it is loaded out in the same car in which it is received. Both Unit “C” and Unit “D”, the most recently completed, are served by the same thaw house, machine shop, and other accessory buildings.

Unit “C” of the low, spread-out type, having a capacity of 100 tons an hour, was put into operation in June, 1925. This sampler speedily proved its efficiency over the old-style sampler employing bucket elevators. Product of this plant, 80 percent of which was crushed to 1 ½ inches maximum size, was shipped to smelters. With the advent of flotation, there developed a demand for a finer product that could be fed directly to the fine-grinding mills of the flotation plants. To meet this need, a four-foot Symons cone crusher was installed.

Later, it was decided to build another unit, the present Unit “D,” to care for flotation trade. Operators of custom mills and smelters, had begun to realize the extent of saving, by eliminating the primary crushing step, and having it performed by the sampler. General practice in Unit “D” is to crush to a 3/8-inch maximum size before sampling, a size particularly desirable in sampling high-grade ores.

Ore is received in carload shipments and dumped into a track hopper of 75 tons capacity, through grizzlies having 11-inch openings. It passes by means of a roller track gate, actuated by a geared hand-wheel, to an 86-inch wide pan conveyor. This discharges onto a three-inch inclined stationary grizzly of special design. Oversize is delivered to a 15 by 24-inch Farrell jaw crusher with manganese steel jaw plates, and toggle bearings. The product from the jaw crusher joins with the grizzly undersize, on 24-inch belt Conveyor No. 1, equipped with a separator magnet suspended over the head pulley, for removal of tramp iron. The conveyor is discharged to a Traylor eleetrically vibrated screen, making a 3/8-inch undersize. A 5 ½ - foot Symons cone crusher reduces the oversize to a 3/8 -inch, after which it joins the undersize from the screen on 24-inch conveyor belt No. 2.

This conveyor delivers the combined product to No. 1 Sampling Machine, where a 20 percent sample is cut. Sampling machines are of a type developed and patented by the Utah Ore Sampling Company. Samples are cut at a uniform velocity, and in a plane at right angles, to the stream. The cutters have a reciprocal motion, cutting the stream alternately from each side. The knife edges cut entirely across the stream, and are sharp, hard, and readily inspected and renewed. No. 1 Sampler, a six-inch cutter, makes 39 cuts per minute, a 20 percent sample, or 400 pounds to the ton.

This 20 percent sample, is passed over a shaking feeder, which feeds in a uniform stream to a pair of 36x16-inch Traylor Type A heavy duty rolls, crushing to 3/16 inch. This 3/16-inch product is carried by 18-inch Belt Conveyor No. 8, to No. 2 Sampler, with a three-inch cutter, making 48 cuts per minute, or a 10 percent sample, or 40 pounds to the ton, the reject being carried by No. 5, 18-inch Belt Conveyor, to the reject elevator, and the sample, now 2 percent of the original, passes over a 30-inch shaking feeder, to a pair of 30x14-inch Traylor rolls, producing a minus 10-mesh material. This product is moved by No. 4, 18-inch Belt Conveyor, to No. 8 Sampler, with a three-inch cutter making 47 cuts a minute, or a 10 percent sample, equalling four pounds to the ton. The reject is passed over No. 5 Conveyor, to the reject elevator.

The sample, now 0.2 percent of the whole lot, or four pounds to the ton, is delivered into a sample buggy, securely housed in a sample vault. The rejects from the three samplers are delivered by an 18x8-inch bucket conveyor elevator, to No. 6 Conveyor, which discharges the lot, crushed to 3/8-inch, and finer mesh, to the loading-out, or reject bin. This bin has a capacity of 125 tons, and is so situated over the loading track and scale, that when the car is fully loaded, it is in weighing position on the scale for the accurate loading to capacity. Immediately after the car has been weighed, a moisture sample is taken by making numerous and accurate trench cuts from the cones formed in the car as the material is loaded.

The sample in the sample buggy is removed to the bucking room, divided, dried, crushed, mixed and subdivided until a final sample of about three pounds of pulp remains. The pulp is split into six parts, and placed in sealed packages, numbered and labeled for delivery to the seller, the buyer and the sampling company’s files.

All the belts, except No. 6, are equipped with conveyor brush outfits, and automatic drive mechanisms, furnished by the Robins Conveying Belt Company. They clean the belts, and aid in preventing contamination of the sample.

The plant was designed by O. B. Hofstrand, Salt Lake metallurgical engineer, to whom the writer is indebted for the information contained in this article. E. G. Jensen is general manager of the Utah Ore Sampling Company; J. E. Parson was superintendent of construction; L. A. Walters is plant superintendent. The board of directors of the company consists of J. Will Knight, Provo, president; E. L. Ellison, vice-president; R. E. Allen, secretary-treasurer; James W. Wade and Oscar Friendly.



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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 6 30 1930

THE MINING JOURNAL

UTAH

B. F. Birch, president and general manager of the Sioux Mines Company, at Eureka, Utah, has announced that the shutdown of the Colorado and Iron Blossom Mines, of the Tintic Standard Mining Company, will not affect the Sioux Concern, which has been operating through the Colorado Shaft. The Sioux has arranged to operate the surface plant at the Colorado, and will continue to develop the 1,914 Level, where some good ore is being opened.
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The Sheep Rock Mining and Milling Company is testing out its new ball mill, erected on the site of the old stamp mill, on the North Creek Canal, near Beaver, Utah, and making adjustments necessary in its machinery. This plant can handle between seven and eight tons of ore in 12 hours, and is operated by a Chevrolet motor, equipped with governors. Recent tests on the ore showed about $100 worth of silver and gold to the ton. It will have to be trucked to the mill, and a contract for the hauling has been let to Jack Miller of Beaver. W. A. Wilson, 319 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, is president and general manager of the Sheep Rock.
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D. J. Penley of Castleton, Utah, is repairing the road to the McCoy Property in Beaver Basin, preparatory to beginning active development. Snow has been a hindrance, but is melting rapidly. Mr. Penley intends to put on a crew at the mine, as soon as conditions warrant. Copper is the metal being developed.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company has finished concreting the collar of the shaft at the Frisco Lulu Mine at Frisco, Utah, and has installed an electric hoist, compressor, and drill sharpener. A water tank has been installed to store water hauled in by the railroad. Prospecting is to start shortly.
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A. C. Howell of Castleton, Utah, and associates, have granted a short option on the Wilson Mesa Placer Mines, 16 miles east of Moab, to Denver mining men, who expect to visit the ground in the near future. The matter of final purchase will then be settled, and consistent plans made
for equipment and operation, based on the results of test work done during the last two years. This property contains approximately 1,000 acres of gold-bearing morain, or gravel, well situated for hydraulic operations. Negotiations are being conducted through W. S. Rowell, Box 254, Green River, Utah.
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Rather extensive testing has been under way during the last six weeks, on the North Wash Gold Placers, in the Henry Mountain District, owned by Cornelius Eckers, et al., of Green River, Utah. Jack Matthews, a practical placer miner from Alaska, is in charge of the work, which is intended to determine the production possibilities of the ground.
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By its declaration of a regular 25-cent quarterly dividend, the Silver King Coalition Mines Company, M. J. Dailey, general manager, 1015 Reams Building, Salt Lake City, becomes the only Utah mine that has not curtailed its dividend rate this year. On July 1, the Silver King Coalition will pay its regular dividend to stockholders of record June 21. This dividend amounts to $805,116.75, and will increase the grand total to $24,940,931.60.
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During the last 10 days in May, the Moscow Silver Mines Company, G. S. Wilkin, president and general manager, 311 McCornick Building, Salt Lake City, shipped two carloads of ore, assaying 7 and 13 ounces of silver, 23 and 26 percent lead, .04 and 1.42 percent copper, and 18 and 25 percent iron, to the ton. The second carload also carried 14 percent zinc, in addition to its other values. Development is on the 900 and 1,600 Levels. On the former, the company is drifting on the Silver Bed, to cut the upward extensions of the oreshoots showing strong mineralization for 600 feet on the 1,100 Level. A drift is also being advanced to the old Glory Stope, to pick up several good leads. On the latter, headings are being driven to pick up the downward extension of the Moscow oreshoots, productive of a million dollars above the 1,400 Level. A drift is being advanced along the Silver Bed, to cut the Red Warrior Ore Zone.
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Kearsage Standard, Inc., A. L. Cuatto, mine superintendent, has opened three feet of ore at the junction of the Bullion Tunnel, and the Thad Stevens Shaft, in the Dry Canyon Section of the Ophir District, in Utah. The ore is believed to be a continuation of that previously mined from the shaft, and the showing continues as the shaft is lowered farther.
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It is understood that the Park Galena Mining Company, L. F. Pearce, superintendent, Park City, Utah, is having some trouble with water at the 500-foot Level. Regular shipments of ore are being made from the 400 Level.
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A satisfactory agreement is said to have been reached by which the Godiva Mine, near Eureka, Utah, will be worked through the No. 2 Shaft, of the Chief Consolidated Mining Company. Phil P. Clark has charge of the mine. During recent years, the Godiva has been inactive, but early production has come from above the 1,000 Level, and deep development, it is believed, will be the key to resumed production.
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The Gilson Asphaltum Company has filed suit against the Utah Gilsonite Company for $28,487.49, representing ore removed from the plaintiff’s property by the defendant, together with interest and court costs. An injunction restraining the Utah Gilsonite Company from removing any more ore from that portion of the plaintiff’s property involved, was also included in the decree.
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The South Tintic Mines Company, B. O. Dobbs, president and general manager, plans to build bunk and boarding houses, and a combined compressor house, and blacksmith shop, at its property, nine miles southwest of Elberta, Utah. Development wilt be through a tunnel, rather than through a shaft, and will require a three-drill compressor, rock drills, and accessory tools.
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Buildings are being repaired at the Scranton Mine, in the North Tintic District, eight miles northwest of Eureka, Utah, and a power line is being built to connect with the Cedar Valley Line of the Utah Power and Light Company. This line will be about five miles long, and it is said that it can be completed within two weeks, when new power equipment will be installed to permit sinking a shaft. Financial support for the work is provided by eastern men, represented by W. W. Bellows, who is directing the rehabilitation work.
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The New Quincy Mining Company, A. L. Harley, president and general manager, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is driving headings at four places on the 300 Level, of the Little Bell Property, in the Park City District. Their objective is the Janney quartzite, and conditions in all four headings are favorable for finding ore.
In the New Quincy Mine Proper, a drift is being pushed from the 1,200-foot Level, following a shoot of good ore, to its intersection with one of the main producing fissures of the formation. New Quincy Proper, and the Little Bell, are adjoining mines.
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The New Premier Consolidated Mining Company is getting ready to drive a tunnel about 500 feet into its ground, on Johnson Creek, about 31 miles south of Gold Hill, Utah. During earlier development, a shaft had been sunk to a depth of 100 feet, but it is too small and crooked, to allow taking out ore to advantage. The tunnel will give a vertical depth of more than 200 feet below the surface showing of the vein. The officers and directors are: O. Gray, president; C. H. Murphy, vice-president, L. L. Brown, secretary-treasurer, and D. W. Ryan. The headquarters of the organization are in the Felt Building in Salt Lake City.
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The directors of the Lehi Tintic Mining Company, Charles Zabriskie, president and general manager, 407 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, have reached a decision to explore the lower horizons of the Apex limestone, a big producer in the Centennial-Eureka Mine, near Eureka. During the last few weeks, most of the development had been done on the 1,100 Level. The Roselle Winze is to be sunk another 80 feet, to the 1,250-foot Level, as the first step in carrying out the intentions of the board of directors. A 1-cent assessment has been levied on Lehi Tintic stock, delinquent date, July 10, 1930.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 7 15 1930

THE MINING JOURNAL

UTAH

The United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, has declared its regular quarterly dividend of 87 ½ cents a share, on the preferred stock, but the dividend on the common stock has been reduced from 87½ cents, to 25 cents a share, in view of the current low price of metals, particularly silver. Both of these disbursements will be made on July 15, to stock of record July 3. During the first five months of the current year, the United States Company earned $1,401,947 before preferred dividends, as compared with $1,957,048 during the similar period in 1929.
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The Alta Tiger Mining Company, O. B. Doyle, president, 407 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is entering pyrites, on the right side of the face, of its lower tunnel, in the South Bingham District. The tunnel is six feet wide, and three feet of pyrite formation has been exposed. The objective of the lower tunnel is the downward extension of a deposit of good ore, opened in the upper tunnel, and is between 30 and 60 feet ahead of the present face of the lower tunnel. Jack McCallister, Felt Building, Salt Lake City, is superintendent of the property.
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The Columbia Steel Corporation, a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation, has acquired the properties, assets, and business of the Columbia Department, of the United States Steel Products Company, also a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation. The change was effected July 1. The business heretofore conducted by the Columbia Department, of the United States Steel Products Company, which included operation of the properties of the former Columbia Steel Corporation, acquired by the United States Steel, last January, as well as distribution on the Pacific Coast, of products of other manufacturing subsidiaries of the United States Steel, will be conducted by the Columbia Steel Corporation, which has offices in the Russ Building, San Francisco, California.
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The Annie Laurie Consolidated Gold Mines ‘Company, B. F. Bauer, 105 North Third West Street, Salt Lake City, president and general manager, has assayed samples of ore from the No. 5 Tunnel in the Blue Bird Mine. These ran 5.68 ounces gold, and 42 ounces silver; 7.15 ounces gold, and 65 ounces silver; 2.20 ounces gold, and 20.7 ounces silver; 3.16- 2.42 ounces gold, and 24 ounces silver. The Combined Metals Reduction Company made a series of tests on the ore in its plant at Bauer, Utah, and report a recovery of 86 percent of its metallic content, can be realized by the flotation process. The power line from the Annie Laurie Mine, to the Fish Creek powerline, a distance of two and one-half miles, has been completed, and electrical equipment is now being installed at the portal of the 4 ½ Tunnel, which is being run midway between the No. 4, and No. 5, tunnels. Fred T. Tilton of Sevier, Utah, is superintendent of the work.
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The lower tunnel of the Treasure Box Mining Company. Inc., in City Creek Canyon, 10 miles northeast of Salt Lake City, Utah, has reached a length of 2,500 feet, and is believed within 100 feet of its main objective, according to Robert Gorlinski, consulting engineer of Salt Lake City. The objective is the downward extension of an orebody, opened in a shaft, near the top of the mountain, and which assayed as high as 241 ounces silver, and 60 percent lead, from samples taken from the shaft. The ground is equipped with a compressor and power drills, and it believed that another two months will pass before the objective can be reached at the present rate of progress. Harry Jackson has charge of the tunnel, and is working under contract. The company maintains an office at 502-3 Atlas Building, Salt Lake City, and has recently levied an assessment of 1 cent a share, payable on or before July 26, 1930.
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The New Venture Mining and Milling Company has been incorporated with a capitalization of $50,000, divided into shares of 10-cent par value. General mining and milling will be engaged in, with Ogden, Utah, as headquarters. The officers of this concern are: D. J. McCormack, president and general manager; J. Woody, vice-president, and J. O. Woody, secretary and treasurer.
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The development of the Hornsilver Mine, of the Tintic Lead Company at Frisco, Utah, K. C. Link, manager, has been centered for the last few weeks on a sulphide ore body, 50 feet below the bottom of the 926 Stope, and 50 feet to the northeast. This stope is known as 923, and is believed to be a continuation of stope 926, which is a heavy producer of silver-lead-zinc ore. Shipments are averaging 11 carloads weekly. A number of deposits of red oxide of zinc have been located. This material carries from 10 to 25 percent zinc, and is being piled on the dump for shipment when the demand for zinc oxide will allow a profit.
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An orebody has been opened. 94 feet below the Niagara Tunnel, by the Bonanza Mining Company, J. F. Buehler, superintendent, Lark, Utah. The ore is 18 inches wide, and is said to carry 110 ounces silver, 6 percent lead, 3 percent copper, 8 percent zinc, and .08 ounce gold, to the ton. Its extent has not yet been determined, but it is said to be near a substantial body of ore opened by the Park Bingham Mining Company.
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Preliminary arrangements have been made to list the Silver King Coalition Mines Company on the New York Stock Exchange. The final details for the listing, will be considered by the directors of the mining company, some time in July.
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As a result of the development of important bodies of ore on its lower levels, it is understood that the Park City Consolidated Mining Company will increase production, to close to a carload a day. Shipment is to the Salt lake smelters. All of the ore shipped, is from development work, and the management has no intention of pushing production under existing metal conditions. On the 900-foot Level, drifts have been run 170 feet north, and 50 feet south, on the vein, and a pocket is being cut there, to start mining ore from the extension of the vein being developed above. Material is arriving for the railway spur. J. J. Beeson, 502 Scott Building, Salt lake City, is general manager.
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The American Metal Mining Company, Thomas Hobday, president and manager, 246 South Main Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, has let a contract for the development of its property in Big Cottonwood Canyon. Some interesting showings were located in the drift, before work was suspended last winter.
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The Union Associated Mines Company, S. A. Parry, president and manager, 509 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, reports two discoveries from its property in Big Cottonwood Canyon, near Alta, Utah. One of these is a 10-inch width of asbestos. Samples are being tested, and some of the material has been running into high values. The other discovery, is a 12-foot vein of lead-silver ore, believed to be the intersection of two veins, and where the ground is so soft, that every foot has to be timbered. Another strike has been made at the company’s West Tintic Mine, where a full face of ore has been opened.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 8 15 1930

for AUGUST 15, 1930

UTAH

In July, the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company paid its quarterly dividends on both the preferred and common stock. Payment on the former was 87 1/2 cents a share, or $425,557, and payment on the latter was 25 cents a share, or $121,547. The Silver King Coalition Mines Company at Park City, paid a quarterly dividend of 25 cents a share, amounting to $305,116.
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The Combined Metals Reduction Company is installing a zinc washing machine at its plant at Bauer, Utah, according to General Manager B. H. Snyder of Stockton. About 60 days will be necessary for its completion. More than 30 men have been engaged in the construction.
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Sam Buckley of Provo, Utah, has sent a trial shipment of dump ore to the smelter, from the Swansea Mine. Pending satisfactory returns, other shipments will be made.
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D. J. Penley of Castleton, Utah, has given up his lease on the McCoy Property, in Beaver Basin, in the La Sal District, on account of the low prices of copper and silver. The 50-mile haul to the railroad is another drawback to a profitable venture. During May and June of this year, he was successful in un-watering the workings, and sinking the shaft to a new depth. A vein of high-grade copper-silver ore, from 12 to 14 inches wide, is left in the bottom of the shaft, which would make operations profitable under ordinary conditions.
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A party of five men, including Messrs. J. S. Gabriel and R. L. Herzinger of Salt Lake City, were in Green River recently, making general examination of fluxing shale properties. While no specific plans are known, it is gathered that production in this shale is planned for the near future. The principal parties at interest are the Better Bearings Corporation of Salt Lake City, with holdings near Green River, and in the Ten Mile and Court House Districts in Grand County. W. S. Rowell of Green River represents this company at that point.
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Another American Fork property is said to have come under the consideration of the American Smelting and Refining Company. This one is the property of the Globe Consolidated Mining Company, comprising about 125 acres of patented ground on the southwest of its Yankee Mine. The smelting company has started developing the Globe ground, from the main tunnel of the Yankee, which will enter the claims at a depth of between 400 and 500 feet. Its face is within a few feet of Globe ground.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company has purchased a new 550-cubic foot compressor, and is installing it at the Yankee Mine, near American Fork, Utah. Attention will be centered on development, under the supervision of L. B. Birch, and no attempt will be made to produce ore. The entire American Fork holdings have been surveyed by the Aerotopograph Company of Washington, D. C. Col Birdseye, formerly chief photographer for the United States Geological Survey, had charge of the aerial mapping. The Frisco Lulu property in Beaver County, is in charge of R. C. Dugdale, and its surface plant has been connected with power, a compressor installed, and the drill sharpener and hoist placed in condition for operation.
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The Eureka Standard Consolidated Mining Company at Dividend, Utah, has leased the adjoining East Tintic Consolidated property, owned by the Chief Consolidated Mining Company. The lease covers approximately 240 acres, and the ground will be prospected, and developed through the Eureka Standard Shaft, which will afford a quicker and less expensive means of development than could be carried on by the Chief Consolidated. The Eureka Standard Mine is in good condition for heavy production, and a thoroughly modern surface plant has been built. A Mancha storage battery locomotive has just been purchased, and will be installed on the 1,300 Level for tramming ore and waste. Its operations will lower the cost of tramming. J. W. Wade, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, is general manager of the Eureka Standard, and Cecil Fitch, Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, is general manager of the Chief Consolidated.
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On July 25, the stockholders of the North Lily Mining Company approved the deal by which it takes over all of the holdings of the Knight Investment Company, located in the Tintic District in Utah. Development will be started at once, and carried on by a subsidiary, the North Lily Knight Mining Company. Under the terms of the deal, North Lily will loan the investment company $125,000, which will be secured by 400,000 shares of the new company, and North Lily agrees to expend $100,000 yearly for a period of three years in development.
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Twenty-five men are said to be prospecting and developing alunite in the Close-in, and White Hill Groups of mines, near Marysvale, Utah, owned by Max Krotki, and in the White Horse Group belonging to Ed. Nelson. A pilot plant has been set up in Salt Lake City to manufacture aluminum sulphate, and, if sufficient aluminum ores are found to insure a profitable venture, a larger plant will be set up near the deposit. The larger plant may be built near Sauna on account of the large amount of coal which will be used in the manufacture of the finished product. Aluminum sulphate has various commercial uses, including the purification of culinary water, and coating of fine book paper.
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The Tintic Standard Mining Company, K J. Raddatz, president and general manager, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has nearly completed a six-inch water column from the surface to the 1,450, or lowest working level, as precaution against an unexpected flow of water. Below the 1,250 Level, the pipe has been placed in the manway of the main shaft, but above that height, there was not enough room for the pipe, so a churn drill hole was sunk from a point a few hundred feet from the main shaft and the pipe installed in the drill opening.
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The flotation mill of the Utah Apex Mining Company at Bingham Canyon, Utah, has been shut down and the entire output is being shipped direct to the Tooele Smelter. While not much information has been given out, it is understood that a slightly higher grade ore, together with a more favorable smelter contact, have had something to do with the shut down of the mill. The greater part of the ore is mined under the leasing system. J. A. Norden is general manager of the organization.
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According to President and General Manager S. A. Parry, 509 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, the Union Associated Mines Company has opened a 20-foot body of milling ore in its West Tintic Mine. The face of the No. 2 Tunnel, which was started to cut the Morning Glory, the Paymaster, the Powell, and the Rew Hawk veins, is opening a deposit of sulphide ore. The Morning Glory Vein has widened from four to five feet, and an average sample assayed 21 percent lead, 7 ounces silver and 80 cents in gold to the ton. Several other mines are responding nicely to development.
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A complete change was effected in the operating personnel of the Queen Esther Mining Company, operating at Park City, Utah, at its special meeting held July 17, 1930. The new officers and directors are: George S. Krueger, president; Thomas Kelly, vice-president, Jerome Paxton, secretary and treasurer, Elizabeth C. Murphy of San Francisco, assistant secretary; H. R. Wallace, Park City, and John Murphy of San Francisco. Further development has not been announced, but it is hoped that the mine will soon be in operation again.
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The Continental Standard Mining Company, C. M. Sonoda, president and general manager, 405 Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City Utah, is said to have closed a bond and lease agreement on the Clark Properties, at Ophir, Utah, controlled by the Ophir Hill Consolidated Mining Company. The Continental Standard is developing and blocking out ore at Leadore, Idaho, and it is understood that both the Idaho and Utah development is financed by Japanese capital on the Pacific Coast and elsewhere. No details of the development of the Ophir property have been learned yet.
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Financial arrangements have been made which will permit the further development. of the property of the Silver Standard Mining Company in the East Tintic Mining District, near Santaquin, Utah. The program of development includes drifting to the northwest, from the 600-foot Level of the shaft, to a point where a geophysical survey indicated ore deposits. Approximately 260 feet of drifting will be necessary to reach the objective. Lead, silver, and gold are the principal minerals in the ore. Dr. L. N. Ellsworth, 204 Templeton Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is president and Perry B. Fuller, general manager of the organization.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 8 30 1930

UTAH
The American Smelting and Refining Company, A. H. Means, 616 McCornick Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, Manager, has purchased an option on the Globe Property, adjoining its Yankee property, in American Fork Canyon. The company binds itself to do at least $3,000 of work a month, and to pay $97,000, $147,000, or $223,000 for the property, depending upon the date on which the option is exercised. The first date is September 25, 1930, and the last July 25, 1938.
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A severe storm in the vicinity of Bingham, Utah, caused a torrent of water, rock, and mud, the force of which collapsed the hospital of the Utah Copper Company. No lives were lost, as there were no patients in the hospital, and employees escaped. Damage done to the town was estimated at $200,000.
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The Lehi Tintic Mining Company, Charles Zabriskie, President and General Manager, 407 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has resumed operations, following a shutdown for a few days, to allow thorough overhauling of machinery and equipment. Development is being carried on below the 1,100-foot Level, through a winze on the iron ore body, and through another winze on the main fault, 600 feet distant.
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Albert Bray, and Wesley Roper, are installing 500 feet of pipe line, to carry water for treating gold-bearing sand and gravel on their property, in the Saw Tooth Mountains, near Deseret, Utah. Although the process for extraction is rather crude, considerable gold is recovered.
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The Tintic Lead Company, K. G. Link, Manager, recently shipped 10 carloads of ore, from its Hornsilver Mine, near Frisco, Utah. On the 300 Level of this property, ore, assaying as high as $16 in gold, 20 percent lead, and 10 ounces silver, per ton, was opened. It was found in virgin territory, and is said to be making back into the lime. Only one shift is working on account of the low metal prices.
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Progress of the exploration tunnel of the Silver King Western Mining and Milling Company, M. J. Dailey, General Manager, 1012 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has been handicapped for a distance of about 2,000 feet, by water-bearing fissures in the quartzite. Lime formation has been entered, and better progress is being made.
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During the six months ended June 30, 1930, the Park Utah Consolidated Mines Company, and the Ontario Silver Mining Company, had a net income of $7,775.57, according to George W. Lambourne, President, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. A net operating loss of $49,256.47 was incurred, after the deduction of depreciation. Income from sales of ore was $830,809.78, while miscellaneous income was $864,871.79. Total expenses were $856,596.22. The combined balance sheet of the two companies showed a reserve of $1,922,231.48 in government securities and cash, while current liabilities were $226,978.87.
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The Bonanza Mining Company, located at Yuba City, California, has shipped two carloads of high-grade ore, from its lease in Park Bingham property, adjoining the United States Mine. The ore is being hauled by wagon, from the portal of the Niagara Tunnel, to Fox’s Spur, a distance of one mile. An opening 15 x 10 feet has been made in the deposit, which is 8 feet thick. It is believed that this deposit will prove to be a bedded replacement ore body, similar to those found in the adjoining mine, in the “B” limestone.
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According to the statement of the Park Utah Consolidated Mines Company, George
W. Lambourne, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, President and General Manager, production for the first half of the year was small, because the management did not wish to exhaust the ore reserves at the low price of lead, zinc, and silver. To offset failure to locate the downward extension of the western ore body, in the Utah Unit, a new ore body, said to contain from 100,000 to 150,000 tons of ore, has been discovered in the City Unit. Four to five feet of ore are being followed on the 1,950 Level, under the eastern ore body of the Park Unit.
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James Morgan, of Eureka, Utah, is making a final cleanup of dump ore, from the old Bullion Beck Mill. The supply will be exhausted within a few weeks, and is so badly scattered on the hillside, that hand shoveling is necessary to gather it. Although this property belongs to the United States Mining and Smelting Company, most of the dump material has been consigned to the American Smelting and Refining Company.
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A fissure has been cut in the East Utah Mine, near Park City, Utah, and a shaft has been started, to cut the ore bodies that are known to be located beneath the tunnel. Control of this mine, is owned by the American Smelting and Refining Company, and, although work is progressing steadliy, very little information is available. Duke Sorenson is Superintendent of the East Utah.
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The Park City Consolidated Mining Company, Douglas Despain, Park City, Utah, Superintendent, is trucking 100 tons of ore daily to the railroad cars. Telephone and electric wires have been changed, and work of laying rails for the railroad spur is practically completed. The winze is now at the 1,000-foot Level, and is to be continued to the water level. Drifting and raising is now under way.
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Three Kings Consolidated Mining ‘Company, A. L. Hurley, manager, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, recently made a shipment of 180 tons. In the mine, the company is following a fissure, which for 40 or 50 feet, has contained ore of low grade. A raise of about 50 feet is necessary before the fissure is in the right position to make into beds.
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At the Bingham Prospect Mine, Bingham Canyon, Utah, the Congor Tunnel has recently been connected with the 500’ Level, and the “555” Winze has been completed. The tunnel furnishes an outlet from the 500 Level, where most of the prospecting has been done, to the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, effecting a saving of about $2 per ton. Two General Electric four-ton locomotives are used on a 24-inch gauge track, of 30-pound rails, one locomotive being equipped with a 300-foot reel for running into side drifts. Mine cars, built by Davis Sheet Iron Works, with a capacity of three tons, are used. Drifting is being done from the new tunnel, 2,500 feet north of the old workings, to the Jordan Limestone, at the rate of 200 feet each month. The Bingham Prospect is equipped with three Ingersoll-Rand compressors, and a 200-horsepower General Electric synchronous motor. The surface plant includes a timber-framing shed, carpenter shop, boarding house with accommodations for 42 men, change rooms, superintendent’s residence, and offices. The blacksmith shop is equipped with a Sullivan oil-burning furnace, and a Gardner-Denver drill sharpener. An F. M. Davis Hoist, capable of reaching to a depth of 900 feet, and driven by a 40-horsepower motor has been installed at the collar of the “555 Winze. James A. Hogle, 169 Main Street, Salt Lake City, is part owner
of the company, and George F. Stott of Lark is Superintendent.
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On August 15, sinking of the shaft was begun at the Scranton Mine, eight miles northwest of Eureka, Utah. The power line has been completed, and a compressor and hoist, with other equipment, have been installed. The purpose of the shaft is to find the faulted segment of the Scranton ore body, which, 25 years ago, produced a considerable tonnage of zinc-lead ore from a bedded replacement deposit in limestone.
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The North Standard Mining Company, John Dorius, General Manager, 412 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has started raising from the 1,400-foot Level, to prospect the soluble limestone beds below the cave on the 1,200 Level in the East Tintic Property. Drifts and crosscuts on the 1,200 Level, proved the cave to be 160 feet long, and 100 feet wide, and on the 180 Level, debris was entered, showing that the solid formation below the cave had not been reached. The formation from the raise consists of iron and manganese, with black quartz carrying mineralization. In the Tintic District, caves of this type have frequently been associated with ore bodies. Michael McPolin, Superintendent, who has been suffering from a severe case of pneumonia, is said to be recovering.
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The Utah Copper Company has driven its Armstrong Tunnel, 800 feet toward the 660-foot Level of the Bingham Metals Company Shaft, the objective, and is preparing to move the Bingham surface plant to the portal of the tunnel, near the old Highland Boy camp. All cost of this work is being borne by Utah Copper, in exchange for certain dumping rights. These improvements will eliminate 660 feet of hoisting and pumping on the incline, as well as a mile long wagon haul of ore and supplies. It will be possible to dump ore directly into railroad cars. After work was started on the tunnel, Bingham Metals suspended operations temporarily, sinking the main shaft having been stopped on the 1,065 Level. This work will be resumed later, in order to prospect for sedimentaries. Prospecting to the northwest for limestone, and a program of diamond drilling are being considered.
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Frank Crosso and Fred Larcher have opened some good copper ore in the Keen Mine, three miles east of Grover, Wayne County, Utah. From a point 50 feet below the surface, they are sorting ore that runs about 80 percent copper, and simultaneously are continuing the shaft below that level. The mine is about 70 miles from the railroad, but the roads are in excellent condition for hauling.
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NORTH LILY MINING ACQUIRES TINTIC HOLDINGS OF KNIGHT CO.

Stockholders of the North Lily Mining Company have authorized directors to complete negotiations, whereby that company will acquire control of Knight Investment Company properties in the Tintic District of Utah, and will operate them through a subsidiary, the North Lily Knight Company. This deal is similar to that approved by the stockholders about one year ago, which was not completed because of the stock market difficulty.

Under the present plan, the North Lily Company will spend $800,000 in three years for development of North Lily Knight holdings in exchange for control of that company, or a block of 1,150,000 shares. The Knight Investment Company will receive 1,149,000 shares of in he new organization for its holdings and will also receive $125,000 for development, as a loan from the North Lily Company. In order to guarantee its availability for development purposes in a given time, this last amount is to be secured by a collateral note on 400,000 of the shares which the investment company received as well as a promissory note, with option to purchase the stock at $1 a share.

The North Lily Knight Company will control the Big Hill and Twentieth Century properties, the Empire Mines Company, one-half interest in the Tintic Central Mining Company, the Dragon Consolidated Mining Company, Defender Mining and Milling Company, Middle Swansea, Eureka Hill Railroad, North Godiva Mining Company, Swansea Consolidated Mining Company, Southern Eureka Mining Company, Tintic Drain Tunnel, Knight Railroad and equipment, Tintic Milling Company, and some un-patented properties.

Last year, more than $25,000 was spent on the Big Hill three-compartment shaft, in repairing the surface plant, cleaning, re-timbering, and continuing the shaft from a depth of about 600 to 838 feet. As soon as agreements can be entered into, sinking of the shaft will be resumed on a cooperative basis, so that companies desiring a deep entry into their ground may secure it without duplication of effort and expense involved in sinking their own shafts.

The North Lily Mining Company is owned by the International Smelting Company, which is controlled by the Anaconda Copper Mining Company.
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UTAH MINING NEWS MINING JOURNAL 10 30 1930

UTAH

A. C. Howell and W. S. Howell, of Green River, Utah, and associates, intend to construct four miles of ditch, at the Wilson Mesa Placers, 16 miles east of Moab, and install complete hydraulic mining equipment.
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A small shipment of carbonaceous shale, was consigned to The Better Bearings Corporation, at Salt Lake City, from Green River, Utah, on September 23. The shale was of the best grade for metal alloy purposes, and was mined and shipped by W. S. Howell, who has served the company in the acquisition and development of its extensive interests near Green River, and with the increasing use of this shale, steady growth is expected
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Cornelius Eeker, and Frank Tawler,of Green River, Utah, have returned to the North Wash Placers, in the Henry Mountain District, and will take advantage of the rainfall, which has been unusually heavy this season. They plan to put in considerable new equipment.
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The directors of the Lehi Tintic Mining Company, have decided to sink the winze in its East Tintic property, from the 1,250 to the 1,400-foot Level, in order to explore at depth the large body of sand carbonates containing good values in lead. Drifting on the 1,250 Level, where the company had entered ore, before it reached its objective fissure, will be continued. An assessment of 1 cent a share, delinquent November 18, has been levied. F. T. Woolley is President of the company, and C. F. Zabriskie is Vice-President and General Manager. Its offices are 407 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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The Mayflower Mines Corporation, William H. Gay, Superintendent, Heber City, Utah, has ordered a compressor with a capacity of 880 cubic feet per minute, and expects to have it installed in the new building, in about 10 days. The long tunnel is making good headway, as it is passing through ground that needs no timbering, and the formation is mineralized. Twelve men are on the payroll, and this number will be increased, as soon as the compressor is ready for work.
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The Utah Galena Corporation, controlled by Ben H. Bullock of Provo, Utah, and associates, recently installed a Henley Hoist, and a Hercules gasoline engine, at its property in the North Tintic District. The shaft is being continued deeper, and is now beyond a depth of 585 feet. L. L. Olson, Box 467, Provo, is Superintendent.
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Since suspending the sinking of its winze at the 1,000-foot point, development of the Park City Consolidated Mining Company’s property at Park City, Utah, Douglas Despain, Superintendent, has been confined to lateral work at the 900, and 1,000-foot levels. The product of development is shipped, and during September, amounted to 8,192 tons, which returned a nice profit above expenses. On the 900 Level, the silver vein carried ore over a length of 650 feet, and is from four to five feet wide. On the 1,000 Level, the vein has been drifted on 250 feet to the northeast.
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The Howell Mining Company, T. L. Walden, general manager, 209 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is raising in Tar Baby ground, on the fissure that produced high-grade silver, lead, copper, and gold, some time ago. The raise is following good values through the footwall limestone of the Cardiff contact, and in another 50 feet, the management expects that the raise will intersect another fissure. Another important piece of work being carried on now, is the drift to the southwest in the Ruby Claim, which is being worked under lease from the Kennebec Consolidated Mining Company.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company is rehabilitating its surface plant at the Yankee Mines, in Mary Ellen Gulch, in the American Fork District, in Utah, and hauling in supplies for the winter. Since taking control of the ground in November, 1929, the mining and smelting company has done 8,252 feet of new work, installed a 500-cubic foot compressor, and remodeled the camp to provide more substantial and comfortable quarters.
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Robert H. Cahill of Salt Lake City, Utah, broker and mining man, has brought back this news from his visit to the Marysvale District, in Piute County, Utah. The La Crosse Mine, operated by Dewitt and Krotki, has opened up a vein of gold ore. The Gold Strike Mine, operated by Lee Trout, made a shipment of gold-silver ore on October 4. The Shamrock Mine is making preparations to resume work. Porter and associates, are getting encouraging results from the Great Western. The Bullion Canyon Gold Mining and Milling Company will have its timbering, which has been under way for two months, completed, and expects to start breaking ore on a three-foot vein before the end of this month. Charles Carlson, Assistant Superintendent of the Bully Boy Mine, received word from the owners, that they will resume operations in the near future.
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Attention of the Sioux Mines Company, E. F. Birch, President and General Manager, Eureka, Utah, is centered on raising from the 2,000-foot Level. The raise is up more than 150 feet, and its face is well mineralized. Funds for development are provided through assessments, and payments are now being received on assessment No. 21, which will be delinquent October 18.
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The Columbia Steel Corporation, W. R. Phibbs, General Manager, Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, plans to expend considerable money in the development of a deposit of manganese, on the property of the North Standard Mining Company, in the East Tintic District, near Eureka, Utah. The deposit is known to be 360 feet long, 85 feet wide, and 100 feet deep.
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The Big Hill Mining Company discussed future development at a recent meeting at Salt Lake City, Utah, and elected the following directors: J. W. Knight, President; Thomas Lyon, Vice-president; Herbert Auerbach and W. Q. VanCott. The offices for the company in the future, will be located at 820 Kearns Building, in Salt Lake City. The bottom of the shaft is now down 900 feet, and will be continued to the Ophir limestone, which lies above the quartzite. The quartzite will be reached at a depth of approximately 2,800 feet. Finances are provided by the parent company, the North Lily-Knight Company, which has set aside $800,000 for the development of its properties in the Tintic District. The Big Hill’s share of this is about $180,000.
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UTAH MINING NEWS TMJ 11 15 1930

for NOVEMBER 15, 1930

UTAH

For a recent shipment of ore to the Salt Lake Smelter, the Annie Laurie Consolidated Gold Mines received $500 a ton, after smelting, sampling, railroad, and haulage charges, according to President and General Manager B. F. Bauer, 105 North Third West Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. The ore, a gold-bearing quartz, was mined from the Bluebird No. 2 Tunnel, in the Sevier County property.
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A drift on the Silver King bed of the Park Standard Mining Company, in the East Park City District, has opened up three feet of quartz, carrying good values in iron and manganese. At the Park King Mine, the company is sinking its winze below the 300-foot level. A 12-foot fissure was cut recently. N. A. Dunyon, 213 Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, Utah, is the General Manager of both mining companies.
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The main tunnel of the FaIk Mining Company, in the Stansbury Range, is being advanced to a point approximately 1,500 feet from the portal, to prospect a number of limestone replacement zones showing on the surface. N. B. Crawford, of Eureka, is consulting geologist and general superintendent. A fault just cut, carries heavy values in iron and some copper.
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The long tunnel of the Mayflower Mines Corporation, William H. Gay, Superintendent, Heber City, Utah, on November 1, had reached a length of 2,825 feet, where it entered a lime-shale.
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The Park-Galena Mining Company, L. F. Pearce, Superintendent, Keetley, Utah, is shipping 120 tons weekly. The Star of Utah Mining Company, John D. Fisher, Manager, Park City, Utah, is driving two crosscuts, from the 8,000-foot point of its tunnel. The crosscut to the Wabash Fissure has been driven 125 feet to the southwest, and the Naildriver Crosscut has been driven 800 feet to the northwest. Charles Moore of Park City, Utah, or Yuba City, California, is President and General Manager of these three enterprises.
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Superintendent E. S. Bowman of the Ophir Lead Mines Company, at Ophir, Utah, reports that a shaft may be started this month to tap the Queen of Utah, Hidden Treasure, and Clift veins. Machinery and equipment to facilitate sinking will be required.
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An eastern syndicate, headed by M. Murray Sanders, of New York City, capitalist, has purchased property at Marysvale, Utah, valuable for its potash, from P. C. Scorup, and S. M. Jorgensen. The deal involves a payment of $150,000, of which $5,000 was paid in cash with the signing of the transfer papers. Work is to be started in six months. Tentative plans are to build a reduction plant, and finish the product on the ground.
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The Century Consolidated Gold Mining Company is being organized to operate the Century Mine, the Nugget Group, and several adjoining claims, near Park Valley,. Boxelder County, Utah. This property has been idle since 1909. Preliminary development has been started and work is to continue all winter. Samples from various parts of the old workings assay from $24 to $60 gold, from 12 to 20 ounces silver, from 5 to 40 percent lead, and from 1 to 8.5 percent copper. A milling plant of about 200 tons daily capacity is planned for later on. The incorporators in the new company include: J. H. Marshall, 501 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah; Heber C. Hicks, President of the New York Mining Exchange, 67 Wall Street, New York City; Willard Scowcroft, and Joseph M. Eccles, of Ogden, Utah.
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The Annie Laurie Consolidated Gold Mines, T. F. Tilton, Superintendent, Sevier, Utah, has suspended work in the No. 4 ½ Tunnel, while the damage caused by a cave-in in the No. 4 Tunnel is being repaired. The cave is said to have exposed some good ore. A carload of ore has been shipped from the rich strike, made recently in the Bluebird Tunnel. Ten men are on the payroll.
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The Tintic Standard Mining Company, E. J. Raddatz, President and General Manager, 1111 Walker Bank Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has signed an agreement with E. F. Birch, President and General Manager of the Sioux Mines Company, at Eureka, for a half interest in the Golf Springs, in East Tintic. In exchange, the Tintic Standard is giving a like amount of water to Birch, from the Miller Ranch springs. The flow from Golf Springs to Dividend, the Tintic Standard camp, will be by gravity, and will eliminate the expense of pumping. The water from the Miller Ranch will be used to supply Elberta, and the line to bring it in is already under construction.
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The two-compartment shaft of the Eureka Standard Consolidated Mining Company at Dividend, Utah, is going down from the 1,300-foot Level, at the rate of 3.2 feet every 24 hours. The objective is the 1,500-point. The ore on the 1,300 level is being followed to the 1,500-foot point by a winze, and connection with the shaft will be made later. Sinking of the shaft will not interfere with regular development.
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On October 21, the Ohio Copper Company started leaching its large tailings dump, at Lark, Utah, according to General Manager Percy H. Kittle, Clift Building, Salt Lake City. When capacity is reached, between 2,500 and 3,000 tons will be treated each day. The tailings are washed down by a stream of water, into a pond, where the minerals are leached.
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The Western Exploration Company has started development in the Ophir Hill Consolidated Mine, in the Ophir District, in Utah. A surface plant, 34x72 feet, has been erected to house the company’s 1,400-cubic foot compressor, 200-horsepower motor, generator set, drill sharpener, oil furnace forge, and other equipment. An 18,000-gallon tank has been built for water storage. Drifting has been started in the West Drift, and in the upper levels of the Top, and Topmost beds. Electric haulage is used, Old stopes are being opened to lessees. Carbonate ore is being mined in the West Drift. E. S. Bowman is Superintendent, and D. E. Loughran, 818 Kearns Building Salt Lake City, is Geologist. The work is headed by George W. Snyder and J. C. Jensen, Felt Building, Salt Lake City, and C. M. Sonoda, Continental Bank Building, Salt Lake City.
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The Utah Ophir Mines Company, J. F. Featherstone, President and General Manager, 809-310 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is mapping [the geology on] its property, consisting of 8,000 acres in the Ophir-Dry Canyon District. At the same time, the company is opening a brecciated zone in its Prince of Wales Claims, that carries low-grade values in silver, lead, zinc, and copper, on the surface. At a depth of 70 feet in the Commodore Group, a drift is following three to four feet of ore assaying $2.40 to $5.60 in gold, 18 to 31 ounces silver, 9 to 18 percent lead, and low values in zinc. A tunnel has been started in the north end of the property, to prospect at depth these showings.
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The Kearsarge Standard Mining Company is exchanging its stock, for that of the Ophir Lead Mines Company, on the basis of four shares for one in the Ophir Lead. The Western Exploration Company, made up of Pacific Coast capital, holds the controlling interest in Ophir Lead, and will furnish the money to develop the Kearsarge Mines. Ophir Lead officers are: W. H. Ellison, President; George W. Snyder, Vice-president, and C. A. Selby, Secretary and Treasurer.
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The Frisco Silver Lead Mining Company, L. F. Block, President and General Manager, 526 Atlas Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has opened milling ore, across 112 feet, on the 200-foot Level of its Frisco Mine. It is estimated that in another 75 feet, the heading will be in commercial ore. Three or four men are working at the mine.
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Officials of the Hellgate Mining Company, and of the Mineral Veins Coalition Mines Company, are working out an arrangement whereby the Hellgate may develop and mine ore recently located in its ground, from the 400 Level of the West Toledo Mine, farther down the mountain. Both of these mines are in the vicinity of Alta, Utah. Such an arrangement would open ground valuable to both companies. The Hellgate would have to drive a heading 800 feet, and would gain a depth of 700 feet below its present level, Dr. Hugo Rettich of New York City, President of the Hellgate Company, may be reached c/o George H. Watson and Company, Hotel Utah, Salt Lake City, and A. O. Jacobson, General Manager of Mineral Veins Coalition, is at 1118 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City.
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UTAH MINING NEWS THE MINING JOURNAL 12 15 1930

for DECEMBER 15, 1930

UTAH

The Rozelle Mining Company, Frank Rozelle, President and General Manager, is cleaning out a 300-foot incline shaft in the Rob Roy Mine, near Iron Springs, Utah, and re-timbered the lower levels. Lateral development from the bottom of the shaft will follow. The granite-limestone contact is being trenched in a systematic manner. Paralleling it, is a crushed quartz zone from 2 to 40 feet thick, that carries ore worth between $8 and $10 a ton. In the South Tintic District, 10 miles west of Nephi, the company is driving a tunnel to prospect the sedimentaries at their contact with the Eagle and Blue Bell limestones, 700 feet vertically below the surface.
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The Emerald Mining Company, Fred Wahlburg, Superintendent, Mammoth, Utah, has done about 150 feet of exploration on the 600-foot Level, and almost directly under the old Diamond Discovery Shaft. The quartz has been sampled at various intervals, and assays from a trace, to 1.2 ounces silver, and from 20 cents to $1 gold, to the ton. Finances are provided through assessments.
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The recent strike on the 400-foot Level of the Lulu Mine, of the American Smelting and Refining Company at Frisco, Utah, R. C. Dugdale, Superintendent, has widened from a few inches, to two and one-half feet. Assays of the ore are reported to run $8 in gold, 17 ounces silver, about 20 percent lead, and some value in zinc. While at its present stage of development it is not of much commercial importance, it is a very important strike.
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The Western Exploration Company, headed by George W. Snyder, J. C. Jensen, and C. M. Sonoda, all of Salt Lake City, Utah, has purchased controlling interest in the old Conger Mine in the Bingham District, and 1,000 feet along the Conger Vein. This ground includes 360 acres, and lies between the Utah Copper, and the United States Smelting Company’s properties. The Conger workings are being cleaned out, and some ore can be mined, while development is in progress. The property will be operated through the Montana-Bingham Tunnel of the United States Smelting Company.
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The Park City Consolidated Mining Company, Douglas Despain, Superintendent, Park City, Utah, has started the development of the Crescent Fissure, located last year, but which was delayed until the Silver Fissure had been developed. The Crescent is a parallel fissure, about 1,300 feet south of the Silver Vein, and was opened by a crosscut on the 400 Level. The 400 Level is in the oxidized zone, and the winze that is being sunk on the Crescent has, at a depth of nine feet, exposed small nuggets of galena disseminated throughout the fissure. A reserve of more than 70,000 tons of ore has been developed in the Silver Fissure, on the 800, 900, and 1,000-foot Levels, and during recent months, shipments have averaged 100 tons daily. A pavement breaker is used in the stopes, and the ore is broken and placed in the chutes without blasting. A cleaner, and higher grade product, is thus being mined, at a considerable saving.
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Negotiations are in progress with New York capital, which may result in the development of the Tornado Group of gold claims, in the La Sal Mountains, according to M. I. Fowler of Castleton, Utah, who has operated the ground every summer, during the past 30 years. His nephew, M. G. Fowler, of Chicago, is in the East, in the interest of the financing. Several strikes of gold, assaying $10, $15, and $25 per ton, have been opened in quartz porphyry. Below the developed porphyry gold ore, averaging $5 a ton, exists to an estimated tonnage of two million tons.
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Repair of the Deep Creek Railroad, which serves the mining camps near Gold Hill, Tooele County, Utah, has been ordered to start within a few days. This section of the road was washed out seven months ago, and in the meantime, about 20 carloads of silver ore have accumulated for shipment. The ore is in the bins at the Rube Lead, Garrison, Monster, and Monocco Mines. The United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company plans to resume work at its arsenic mine in that district, which has been idle since the railroad went out of commission. Several new developments are anticipated in the Gold Hill District.
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ELECTRIFICATION OF THE MINES OF UTAH COPPER CO.

Reasons for the selection of electric shovels and locomotives,at the Utah Copper Mine, are outlined in an article by Ray Corfield, Assistant Engineer, Utah Copper Company, in General Electric Review, for November, 1930. This is one of the largest and most interesting mining undertakings in the world.

The history of the Utah Copper venture dates back to 1863, when the ore body was first discovered, in connection with underground silver mining. Immense quantities of low-grade copper ore were known to exist, but it was not considered economical to mine it. Copper at the time was selling at 12 cents per pound, making it necessary to mine on a very large scale, if profits were to be realized. Several mining engineers reported favorably on the Bingham copper deposits, all conceding that a large capital investment would be required.

The Utah Copper Company was organized in 1903, and plans were made for opening this great copper deposit on a large scale. From the beginning, an open-cut project, with standard gauge rail facilities, was contemplated. The first steam shovel was put in operation in 1906 on what appeared to be an ordinary looking mountain covered with small timber and heavy underbrush.

The ore body was covered with an overburden of decomposed rock, varying in depth from 75 to 200 feet, and it was necessary to remove this capping, and deposit it in nearby ravines before ore could be mined. After 24 years of mining, the present mine site covers approximately 725 acres,, and to date over 200,000,000 tons of overburden have been removed, and an almost equal amount of ore has been transported to the concentrating plants, which are located 20 miles from the mine.

Early in 1921, an economic study of mining methods was made with the idea of reducing costs. Drilling, blasting, and track laying were being done at a very fair cost, while the loading and transportation was a large percentage of the total cost. A detailed study of the loading operation was made, and certain costs predicted for electric drive.

Steam shovels had been in operation for years and accurate cost records kept. These predicted costs, when compared with the established steam costs, led to the purchase, in 1922, of two railway-type electric shovels, one being driven by alternating current motors, while the other was driven by direct-current motors.

Comparative tests were made between the two types of electric and steam, and it took very little time to convince all concerned of the superiority of either type of electric, over its steam competitor. Considerable difference of opinion existed regarding the merits of the two electric drives. At present there are eight shovels equipped with an A/C drive, and 15 with a D/C drive.

The results of the shovel electrification were very gratifying, and led to a study of the haulage system. The work of transporting the ore, from the benches to the various assembly yards, and waste, to adjacent gulches, was being done by approximately 50 steam locomotives. This study of the haulage system resulted in a complete electrification of all transportation.

Operating economies due to the electrification are not available, but expected advantages are summarized as follows: elimination of firemen, watchman, and part of engine house crews; abandonment of present coaling and watering facilities; higher speeds and greater hauling capacity, together with customary power saving; and last, but not least, better visibility due to the absence of smoke, which makes for safer operating conditions.

The paper describes in detail, locomotive specifications, the substations, and trolley line systems designed, and a number of the special problems, which had to be met.
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COMBINED METALS PIOCHE NV BAUER UT TMJ 12 30 30

DECEMBER 30, 1930



Combined Metals Making Good at Pioche

By GAIL MARTIN, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Underground development is in progress at Pioche, where the Combined Metals has opened extensive mineralization in the limestone bed.

The mill at Bauer, Utah, was rehabilitated for treatment of Pioche ores.

The story of the camp of Pioche, today, is the story of the faith, vision, and enterprise, of two brothers, E. H. Snyder, and George W. Snyder, of Salt Lake City. Faith, according to the Scriptures, will move mountains. At Pioche, if it has not moved mountains, it has worked wonders in the way of moving ore from the mine, to the smelter, of devising processes to make this ore amenable to reduction by fire on an economic basis, and of raising money to develop ground that others thought had no ore, or declared long ago, worked out.

Not only has the old Nevada camp emerged from the class of a famous ghost city, and become a substantial producer of zinc-lead-silver ores, largely as a result of that highly desirable, but illusive quality mentioned so significantly in the Holy Writ, and supplied without fail, by the Snyder boys, but it has the chance of developing into one of the world’s largest mining centers. Without a doubt, when this once-famous bonanza camp attains the stature of a Butte, a Joplin, or a Cripple Creek, local historians will trace back the beginning of its second and more permanent cycle of prosperity, to the beginning of the Combined Metals, Inc., enterprise, fostered by the two Snyder boys, and their father, the veteran operator and promoter, Willard F. Snyder.

Sixty years ago, Pioche was one of the most famous camps in the West. With Virginia City, Hamilton, Eureka, Tuscarora, and other Nevada strongholds of mining, Pioche had a world-wide reputation for rich ore, and sudden wealth. The product of the Pioche mines contained such high values in silver, gold, and lead, that it could be freighted a hundred miles or more over the desert to the nearest railroad, and return a handsome profit to the fortunate shipper. Yet, hardly a decade later, the camp of Pioche, once boasting a population of several thousand souls, had come unto sad days. The rich ores of the Raymond-Ely, and Meadow Valley, had been stripped from the quartzite. The vein system, productive of $20,000,000, or more, along a strike of but 3,000 feet, and a depth of 1,200 feet vertically, had been looted of its wealth. Working and surface plants, that not so far back had been hives of industry, were taken over by rats and bats, and other denizens of the desert.

Although large deposits of lead-zinc-silver ores had been found in the limestone surrounding the richly productive quartzite area, Pioche, as a mining center, seemed definitely ended for all time. The zinc-lead ores could not be handled at a profit. Heavy penalties for the zinc content were imposed by the smelters. Aside from some mining at nearby camps, and the operations of leasers, Pioche dragged out a hopeless existence for many a long year.

This was the state of affairs when E. H. Snyder, a young graduate mining engineer, became interested, through his father, in the old camp. A study of conditions, convinced Mr. Snyder that Pioche still had much to show the world in the way of mineral production. Money and skill could make the complex lead-zinc ores pay big profits. Having sized up the situation, he at once started to supply its needs.

A large territory was acquired by the Combined Metals, Inc., organized by W. F. Snyder and Sons. E. H. Snyder hired a staff of metallurgists, and with them, started to work out the metallurgy of the ores. In the meantime, he supervised development at the mine, where one of the most massive sulphide ore bodies ever found in the West, was being opened up rapidly.

When tests convinced Mr. Snyder that a selective flotation process, suitable for the complex Combined Metals ores, had been worked out, he boarded a train, and invaded the East, on a search for capital to back his project. After a long period of further experimentation, examination, and parleying, the National Lead Company was induced to finance operations; the old Honerine Mine and Mill at Bauer, Utah, was purchased and rehabilitated, and the plant equipped for treatment of the Pioche ores. This project has grown and flourished in such a manner that several additions have had to be made to the Bauer plant, in order to take care of the growing custom business developed by the Combined Metals Reduction Company.

At Pioche, activity fostered by the Snyder interests, has grown by leaps and bounds. While E. H. Snyder was mustering the technical resources of his organizations, George W. Snyder was centering his attention on supplying funds. The Bristol Mine was taken over and opened up. A deserted mine, not so long ago, this property has its own 17-mile railroad, aerial tramway, and electric power plant, and is producing 4,000 tons of ore monthly.

In the vicinity of Pioche, the Combined Metals, Inc., is putting down a new four-compartment shaft to furnish an outlet for the Combined Metals bed, one mile to the West of the Combined Metals No. 1 Shaft. Six miles to the west of the new shaft, two more big shafts are being sunk to explore the Combined Metals bed in the Comet District. This work is being financed by W. F. Snyder and Sons, the International Smelting Company, and James Elwood Jones, West Virginia coal operator.

Mining men, who have visited the Combined Metals mine at Pioche, and have seen the extent of the mineralization in the Combined Metals limestone bed, say that the replacement in its extent, uniformity, and intensity, is astounding. For over 4,000 feet on its dip, the Combined Metals bed has been continually productive. In places, the ore has been 250 feet wide, and 40 feet thick. Average thickness is eight feet. In the last block opened up, the company estimates that there is one-quarter million tons available for shipment. Value of the ore averages, it is said, 8 ounces of silver to the ton, 8 percent lead, and 18 percent zinc, with low values in gold.

The kind of operator E. H. Snyder is, can best be judged from the following incident: Last December, sinking of the big Caselton Shaft, one mile west of the Combined Metals No. 1 shaft, was started. Ordinarily, a piece of work as important as this and involving as large an expenditure would have received some publicity.

Most managements would have announced their plans. But not E. H. Snyder. He is of the type that works, and lets the world find out about him later. When the information was finally pried out of him by a newspaper man, the Caselton Shaft had been sunk 975 feet, and passed through a thick zone of heavy mineralization containing low-grade ore.

Cutting of a station had been started at the 840 Level to prospect this showing in the Combined Metals bed, the shaft was being continued to the 1,400-foot level, and the Union Pacific Railroad had completed surveys preliminary to extending the Prince Consolidated Railroad one mile and a quarter, to the Caselton Shaft.

This shaft has been equipped with a 76-foot headframe, a compressor with a capacity of 1,500 feet of free air per minute, and a 200-horsepower Nordberg hoist. Sinking will be continued to the 1400 level, so that raises from this horizon can economically exploit, the Combined Metals bed, which between Caselton, and No. 1 shafts, has been faulted in several blocks to a depth of 1,200 or 1,300 feet.

In the Comet District, the Snyder-International Smelting-Jones group is sinking two shafts, the Pan American, and the Forlorn Hope, about a mile and a half apart, The Forlorn Hope Shaft, in One-Wheel Canyon, has been sunk to the 600-foot level, and the Combined Metals limestone horizon entered. A station is being cut, preliminary to crosscutting a number of ore-bearing fissures. The first, a small one, will be cut in 100 feet, and the next at 300 feet.

The Pan American Shaft is now being sunk to the 1,300-foot mark, with a depth of 2,400 feet as its probable bottom. At 800 feet, the shaft cut low-grade ore, which persisted for 500 feet. A power line supplies electricity for operations at both mines. A five-mile aerial tramway will connect these shafts with the Prince Consolidated broad gauge railroad.

PICS No. 1 Shaft and surface buildings of the Combined Metals Reduction Company at Pioche, Nevada. Right: New Caselton Shaft at Pioche, Nevada. This is a four-compartment shaft, down 1,000 feet and is to be sunk to the 1,500 level. It will later be connected with the No. 1 Shaft. Equipment consists of a 76-foot headframe, 200-horsepower Nordberg hoist, and 1,500-foot compressor.
Flotation plant of the Combined Metals Reduction Company at Bauer, Utah.




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UTAH MINING NEWS THE MINING JOURNAL 12 30 1930

THE MINING JOURNAL

UTAH

The Lehi Tintic Mining Company, 407 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has shipped its first two carloads of ore from the North Tintic District. This ore came from the new strikes on the 1,100 and the 1,250 Levels. It was hauled 14 miles to Goshen. Lead values on the lower level are said to be improving. Plans are to ship only the ores mined from development. No stoping will be done.
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During the last week in November, the Utah Apex Mining Company, J. A. Norden, General Manager, shipped 50 carloads of ore to the smelter, from its mines in Bingham Canyon, Utah. This was almost twice its regular weekly tonnage. All ore available for shipment was cleaned up preparatory to ceasing production on December 1, and to confining activities in the immediate future, to developing known ore bodies, and to prospecting for new deposits. The low prices of silver, lead and zinc, and the low grade of Utah Apex ores, made this change advisable.
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Within 10 days the Park Bingham Mining Company, E. R. Pembroke, President and General Manager, 210 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, intends to have its compressor plant and hoist replaced. The plant was destroyed by fire a couple of weeks ago, and the Bonanza Mining Company, lessee, is also helping with the rehabilitation. The new plant is similar to the old one, and includes a 550-foot Ingersoll-Rand compressor, General Electric motors and an electric hoist.
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In the early spring, the Union Associated Mines Company plans to build a mill in the Erickson District in Utah, where a substantial tonnage of low-grade ore has been developed during the past year, according to S. A. Parry, 509 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, President and General Manager of the company. Two faces of ore, each about seven feet wide, are being mined. In addition to its three contiguous properties, Union Associated owns the Cottonwood King, and the Twin Peaks, adjoining mines in the Cottonwood District. A small quantity of rich ore has recently been mined from a vein in the Cottonwood King.
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Announcement has been made of the acquisition of the Susannah Mines, by the Century Consolidated Gold Mining Company, J. H. Marshall, General Manager, 501 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. The consolidation gives the Century Consolidated control of all fissuring and ore bodies, over a length of 8,500 feet, and a width of 5,600 feet, two-thirds of which is owned outright, and the remainder held under bond and lease. The Susannah is equipped with a mill, boarding house, bunkhouse, assay office, machine shop, and compressor building, all in good condition. The lower tunnel, 1,200 feet into the ground, will be cleaned and re-timbered, and ore blocked out. This tunnel has opened the Lizzie Vein, which strikes northeast into the Century ground, and which has been drifted on nearly 500 feet. The drift was in commercial ore varying from five to six feet in width. Another 400 feet of tunnel will place its face beneath the workings of the old Century Mine, where the Lizzie Fissure has been followed more than 1,600 feet. In the Century ground, it maintained about the same width as in the Susannah Lower Tunnel. Marshall states that they expect to build a reduction plant as soon as sufficient ore has been opened.
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Gas and extreme heat have handicapped work on the 1,400-foot Level, of the property of the North Standard Mining Company, Roger McPolin, Superintendent, Eureka, Utah, but conditions are about normal again, and development has been resumed. The objective of this development is to prospect the soluble limestone beds below the cave, on the 1,200 Level. The drift is now in very soluble limestone, about 100 feet between walls, and an important showing may be made with any round of shots.
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The American Smelting and Refining Company has opened siliceous gold ore, on the 200-foot Level, of its Lulu Mine, at Frisco, Utah, R. C. Dugdale, Superintendent. The strike was made about 100 feet north of a strike, three weeks ago, and both showings are similar in character. Considerable gold has been found in the recent strike on the 400-foot Level, but its development is delayed until a more thorough geological knowledge of the levels above is obtained.
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J. M. Grisley, formerly with the Cleveland Rock Drill Company, has leased the Cardiff Mine dumps, and certain sections of the mine, in the South Fork, of Big Cottonwood Canyon, Utah. He has set up a gravity concentration plant, consisting of a Dodge 7x9 crusher, screens and four Hartz jigs, operated by electricity. Early cold weather froze the dumps, and slowed up his work, as he had planned to mill that ore first. Instead, he will keep the concentrator running through the winter on pillars of low-grade ore, above the tunnel level, which were left standing after former mining. Considerable 8 to 10 percent lead ore, with some silver and zinc, remains in the underground workings. The concentrator can recover from two and one-half to three tons of concentrates a day and has been planned so that the iron and zinc can be eliminated, and a product, averaging from 50 to 60 percent lead and 25 to 80 ounces silver, realized. To carry on the work, two men will be required in the mine, and two at the concentrator.
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The Alta Tunnel and Transportation Company is opening ore that carries 45 percent lead, and 45 ounces silver on the 800 Level, below the Annie Tunnel Level of the Prince of Wales Mine, in Silver Fork Gulch. For more than 20 feet this drift has followed bedded ore. At the 400 Level another heading is being driven to reach the downward extension of this ore, and at the 850 Level, a raise is being driven above the drift, to contact the carboniferous limestone. The company has an office at 609 Utah Savings and Trust Company Building, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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In line with its agreement of nearly two years ago, with Bingham Metals Company, the Utah Copper Company has completed the Armstrong Tunnel to its connection with the Bingham Mines vertical shaft on the 710 Level. Contact was at the 4,400 point in the tunnel, and the hoist is being moved from the Nast incline shaft, to the 710 Level at the head of the vertical shaft. Meanwhile, Bingham Metals, Gibson Berry, President and General Manager, has sunk its vertical shaft to the 1,100 Level, and is cutting a station from which the extensions of the copper-gold and silver-lead-gold ores on the upper levels will be explored. Ultimate plans call for sinking this shaft to the 1,500-foot point.
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With the acquisition of the Deseret Claims, the Bullion Canyon Gold Mining and Milling Company, Paul Kimball, President and Engineer, owns outright 12 patented mining claims in the Ohio Mining District, near Marysvale, Utah. Ore bins, with a capacity of 150 tons, have been completed, and additional buildings are being built. The tunnel has reached a point within 100 feet of the objective outcropping. A compressor and other mining machinery are being installed and are expected to be in operation by the middle of this month.
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The Western Exploration Company, E. S. Bowman, Superintendent, Ophir, Utah, has opened a 14-foot body of ore in the Wild Delirium workings of the Ophir Hill Mine. The ore is said to average 13 percent lead, 10 percent zinc, 10 ounces silver, and 2 percent copper. Similar ore has been opened in the Miner’s Delight workings of the Ophir Silver, where the headings are being advanced toward a four-foot width of ore. Western Exploration has completed the Ophir Hill surface plant at a cost of approximately $55,000.
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John M. Bestelmeyer, mining engineer of Provo, Utah, has completed an examination of the mines of the Fortuna Consolidated Mines Corporation, located 12 miles north of Beaver. More than 30 samples of ore were taken from the old workings. Those taken near the surface varied from $3.80 to $96 a ton, while those from the lower levels ran from $42 to $140 per ton, mostly in gold. The examination and sampling covered about three months. The Fortuna Consolidated comprises 12 mining claims, including the Lucky Boy and Gondola workings.
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rehab

UTAH MINING NEWS TMJ 1 15 1931

THE MINING JOURNAL FOR JANUARY 15, 1931

UTAH

Subject to the approval of their respective attorneys, the Park Bingham Mining Company has been granted an extension of time on its mortgage, due the United States Smelting, Refining, and Mining Company, on January 1, 1931. According to the new agreement, the mortgage falls due July 1, 1931. Park Bingham plans to conduct no mining, but will continue to lease to the Bonanza Mining Company on a royalty basis, with E. F. Kincaid as Superintendent of Mines. Both companies will share the same office. On December 28, the Bonanza Company reopened the surface plant, and the following day, started hoisting ore. A production of about 75 tons daily is planned, half of which will go direct to the smelter. The new Park Bingham Board includes: James E. Ellison, President; Earl I Havenor, Vice-president; E. A. Rogers, Secretary-Treasurer; Allen T. Sanford, H. R. Voyles, L. D. Foreman, and R. A. Glenny.
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Considering the conditions which the mine operators had to combat during 1930, the United States Smelting, Refining, and Mining Company, is to be commended for the splendid record which it has made. During the 11 months, ended November 30, 1930, the average price of silver was 38.65 cents an ounce, as against 53.4 cents during the corresponding period in 1929; lead averaged 5.55 cents a pound, against 6.88 cents in 1929; and zinc averaged 4.59 cents a pound, against 6.58 cents in the 1929 period.

The consolidated earnings during the first 11 months of the year, after all deductions except property reserves, are estimated at $6,017,170. Providing $2,639,419 for reserves for depreciation, depletion, and amortization, of property, net earnings, after all charges, are estimated at $3,377,751. It is estimated that after paying preferred dividend requirements of $3.50 a share, the earnings on the common stock will this year amount to approximately $3.20 a share. The directors have declared the regular quarterly dividend of 25 cents a share on the common stock, and 87½ cents a share on the preferred stock, both payable January, 15, 1931, to stock of record December 31, 1930.
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On January 2, 1931, the Silver King Coalition Mines Company paid a dividend of 15 cents a share, amounting to $183,070.05. This is the same rate of payment as the September quarterly dividend, when the payment was reduced from 25 cents a share. During 1930, this company disbursed $76,373.60 in dividends.
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The Silver Wave Mining Company has paid a second dividend in the liquidation of its assets, which have been disposed of to the American Smelting and Refining Company. Disbursement was made at the rate of .088 cents a share and amounted to $5,000. The Silver Wave dividends during 1930, amounted to $43,850, and its grand total to $47,735.
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The Gold Mountain Mines Company, Joseph R. Murdock, President, is making arrangements for new developments at its property, southwest of Sevier, Utah, which will be of considerable importance. Recent assays show encouraging amounts of gold and silver.
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Dr. A. J. Lewis of Salina, Utah, has leased the Gold Strike, Tushar, and Shamrock mines, near Marysvale, Piute County, and is working on plans to operate the mine. He is said to have shipped two railroad carloads of ore from these mines, and has had satisfactory returns in gold and silver.
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Provo, Utah, men, headed by Eugene Allen, are opening up the vein in the Sheep Rock Mine, near Beaver, that has produced ore assaying as high as $1,000 a ton, in gold and silver, and averaging $50 to $100 a ton. The shaft is being re-timbered, and some mill ore is being saved. Earl Bissell is Superintendent.
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The Bullion Chief Mining Company, Lloyd Hoskins, President and General Manager, 1486 South Sixteenth East Street, Salt Lake City, is operating its 50-ton wet gravity concentrator, one shift per day. This plant is 1,000 feet from the portal of the main tunnel, in its property at Alta, Utah. Two men are required to operate the mill, two other men are breaking mill ore on the No. 1 Level, and eight men are pushing the No. 2 Raise, to its objective. During the shift, 12 tons of ore are milled, resulting in about 1.3 tons of concentrates, worth at present market conditions about $72 a ton, after hauling and smelting. A second shift will be engaged in the mill as soon as the No. 2 Raise is completed. Supplementing the compressor, power and light for the mill, the tunnel, and buildings, is furnished by the Utah Power and Light Company. The concentrates are hauled to the smelter when between 50 and 60 tons have accumulated, and are accompanied by whatever high grade has been mined. No attempt is being made to reopen the flooded stopes of the lower workings, where a large tonnage is said to exist.
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rehab

UTAH MINING NEWS TMJ 1 30 1931

THE MINING JOURNAL for JANUARY 30, 1931

UTAH
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A decided change has taken place in the face of the tunnel being driven by Harry Jackson, for the Treasure Box Mining Company, Inc., in City Creek Canyon, 10 miles northeast of Salt Lake City, Utah. A hole put in the limestone released a flow of water, which has increased until rubber clothes must be used while drilling, and within a few feet, the drills sank into soft material. The tunnel is in 2,600 feet, and it has a vertical depth of 900 feet below a tunnel and incline shaft, near the top of the mountain, where a body of high-grade silver-lead ore has been developed. Several shipments were made from this deposit, before water troubles forced the management to resort to a more economical means of developing and mining the ore. It is believed that the new tunnel will soon drain the ground. The Treasure Box management maintains an office at 133 Ness Building, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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During December, the American Smelting and Refining Company shipped 235 tons of ore from the Yankee Mines in Mary Ellen Gulch, in the American Fork District. It was chalcopyrite, and carried good values in gold, silver, and copper. Mild weather has hindered, rather than speeded up production, since it destroyed the sleighing in the canyon. Further development of the Yankee Mines ore is progressing, and arrangements are being made for more economical stoping. At the Park City property, two diamond drill holes sunk in the Silver Creek section, were lost on account of the nature of the ground. A third hole is being sunk by the Sullivan Machinery Company on a “no hole, no pay” basis. American Smelting and Refining discontinued work at the Lulu Mine at Frisco, at the close of the year, and has abandoned its lease and bond on that property.
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During 1930, the Chief Consolidated Mining Company, Cecil Fitch, General Manager, Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, Utah, shipped 2,066 carloads of ore in 1930, as compared with 2,096 carloads during 1929. The production of the Chief Mine proper was 215 carloads, against 659 carloads in the preceding year; the Eureka Lilly Mine shipped 476 carloads, against 269 carloads in 1929; and the Eureka Hill showed a heavy increase in dump ore shipments.
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Further development of the Kearsage and Bullion Mines, of the Ophir Lead Mines Company, in the Ophir District, in Utah, will be based upon the results of a geological survey to be made soon. Some development is now going on in the Main Kearsage Incline and in the White Drift. Kearsage stockholders who have paid their assessment to Ophir Lead, are receiving one share in the new company, for every four Kearsage shares which they held. E. S. Bowman is Superintendent of Mines.
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The Bonanza Mining Company, E. F. Kincaid, Superintendent, Bingham Canyon, Utah, is producing about 25 tons of ore a day, from the further sinking of the 94-foot winze, sunk from the Niagara Tunnel. While the winze is going down on the edge of the deposit, where the ore is not so rich, it is averaging $8 gold, 35 to 37 percent iron, 14 ounces silver, 8 percent lead and 1 percent copper, and is returning a nice profit. A much higher grade of ore will be stoped from the main ore body later. At another point, 35 feet above the Niagara Tunnel, the company is mining 35 tons of ore a day.
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The Century Consolidated Gold Mining Company, J. H. Marshall, General Manager, 501 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is installing a Gardner-Denver compressor, in Boxelder County, and will immediately continue the 1,200-foot lower tunnel. The camp has been made comfortable, coal and supplies stored, and the old tunnel re-timbered, and re-tracked.
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The 500-foot tunnel of the Utah Ophir Mines Company in Ophir-Dry Canyon will be projected approximately 200 feet, to reach the intersection of the Bingham Ophir Fissure, with the Brooklyn limestone ore horizon, according to J. F. Featherstone, 309 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, President and General Manager. No work will be attempted this winter at the Commodore Mines high up on the mountain, on account of the difficulty of getting supplies to camp. The Commodore is known to hold a large deposit of both high-grade, and low-grade silver ores.
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The name of the Greeley Mining and Milling Company, with property in the North Tintic District, in Utah, has been changed to the Gold Standard Mining Company. It is negotiating for control of a gold mine. R. M. Crocker, 1118 Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, is Engineer for the company.
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The Utah Copper Company, D. D. Moffat, General Manager, Bingham Canyon, Utah, lost a power shovel and a drilling rig, in the recent landslide in its pit. The slide was several million tons of waste rock, which had been loosened by snow water, and weakened by fissures in the west quartzite, of the open pit. We understand that the company suffered no great loss.
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According to President L. N. Morrison, 1538 Princeton Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah, the Tintic Lead Company has produced 500 carloads of ore from its Hornsilver Mine, at Frisco, during the past year. The ore carried gold, silver, and lead, and about 70 carloads of the total were yellow metal. Since early fall, when the gold ore deposits showed higher values, Tintic Lead has shipped from four to five carloads of gold ore a week, out of a total production of nine to 10 carloads.
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It is understood that a new company, known as the Utah Gold Company, will operate the principal properties of the Fortuna Consolidated Mines Corporation, at Beaver, Utah. The Fortuna property comprises 18 patented claims, and one unpatented claim, belonging to Lumery and Moore, of Goldfield, Nevada. The workings have been carefully examined and sampled, and show encouraging values in gold. Preliminary plans are to work through the United States Shaft, on the lower end of the Fortuna Queen, which has been re-timbered, and then through the Fortuna Independence and the Fortuna Gold claims. The officers of the Fortuna Consolidated are: E. V. Anderson, President; H. A. Smith, Secretary, and E. C. McGarry, Treasurer. The officers of the operating company are: A. T. Burch of Los Angeles, President; S. B. Tuttle, Vice-President; and D. W. Jeffs, Secretary-Treasurer and Manager.
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The raise from the 2,200-foot Level of the Sioux Mines Company, at Eureka, Utah, has been in mineralized quartz for 20 feet, indicating its approach to the objective ore body. This ore is 250 feet east of the ore-bearing section on the upper levels, and is of special significance, because in that section of the district the veins are usually surrounded by barren quartz. Operations are financed through assessments of 1/2 cent, levied at three-month intervals. Since the Tintic Standard shut down its Colorado and Iron Blossom Mines, President and General Manager E. F. Birch has been confronted with the additional expense of operating the Colorado Shaft, through which the Sioux operations are carried on.
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During the winter, the Bullion Chief Mining Company is storing concentrates from its underground 50-ton wet gravity concentrator, in bins, and when their capacity is exhausted, the No. 1 East Drift will be floored, and the concentrates piled there, awaiting a better market. The mill is working on ore from the No. 1 Raise, where it has been followed 40 feet, and averages four and one-half feet across. The ore averages 7 to 8 percent lead, and 7 to 8 ounces silver to the ton. About 265 feet north of the No. 1 Raise, another raise is being started, and at a height of 75 feet, should connect with the old stopes above. Lloyd Hoskins, 1486 South Sixteenth East Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, is President and General Manager.
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The Bullion Canyon Gold Mining and Milling Company has installed seven carloads of machinery at its mine at Marysvale, Utah, and has placed it in operation. The new buildings have been completed, and it is expected that shipments will begin within 30 to 60 days. At a meeting of the Board of Directors on December 27, the following officers and directors were elected to office: George Q. Morris, Acting President; C. P. Margetts, Vice-President; R. H. Cahill, Treasurer; M. L. Scott, Secretary; Dell Garff, G. H. Backman, A. J. Elggren, and Walter W. Steed.
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We understand that the tangled affairs of the Queen Esther Mining Company are being straightened out, and that it is planned to start development at Park City, Utah, early in the year. George S. Krueger is President of the company.
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Now that a number of obstacles have been overcome, the Eureka Standard Consolidated Mining Company, Lester R. Dobbs, Superintendent, Dividend, Utah, has resumed shaft sinking. The great drawback was the release of a flow of hot water, at a depth of 1,875 feet, and called for a change in pumping equipment. The water was so hot that it would burn one’s hand, or about 183 degrees, and is an unusual development in a Tintic mine. At the present time, the flow is approximately 150 gallons a minute, and is being easily handled. The shaft has reached the 1,400-foot mark, and in another 50 or 100 feet, a station will be cut, and a drift started.
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rehab

UTAH MINING NEWS TMJ 2 15 1931

UTAH MINING NEWS  MINING JOURNAL  2 15 1931

MINING METHODS AND COSTS AT SILVER KING COALITION MINES

Mining methods and costs at the Silver King Coalition property, at Park City, Utah, are the subject of a paper by M. S. Dailey, General Manager of Silver King Coalition Mines Company, which has been published by the United States Bureau of Mines, as one of its series covering mining practices, methods, and costs, in the various mining districts of the United States.

The property of Silver King Coalition is situated in the western part of the Park City Mining District, about one and one-half miles southwest of Park City, Utah. This district, famous for the richness, size, and continuity of its silver-lead ore deposits, was a farming community first, and a mining camp afterward. The area offered abundant pasturage and dense forests. Erosion had rounded off the mountains, and effectually concealed the vast mineral wealth lying below the surface.

The first mining claim in the district was located in 1869, 16 years after the pioneer farmers first settled in the district. Three years later, the Ontario Mine was located, an event that determined the future trend of the industrial operations at Park City.

The paper covers in detail, the prospecting and mining methods, underground haulage, hoisting, tramway, ventilation, sampling, and wage scales, at the Silver King. With the exception of a very small tonnage of crude ore, the entire output from the mine is treated in the company’s flotation concentrating mill. Two products are made: One a high-grade lead-silver product, with small zinc values, and the other a zinc concentrate carrying a high zinc content, and minor values in silver and lead. In 1929, the Silver King Coalition Mines Company produced a total of 180,800 day tons of ore, 219 dry tons of this amount being crude smelting ore. The remaining 179,989 tons of milling ore, were treated in the flotation mill, and 84,542 tons of lead concentrates and 14,642 tons of zinc concentrates were produced.

This bulletin is known as Information Circular 6871, published by the United States Bureau of Mines, Department of Commerce.


REHAB NOTE: don't see many trees left standing on the hillside; probably all inside of the mine.

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The Lehi Tintic Mining Company, Charles Zabriskie, General Manager, 407 Clift Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has assessed its stock 1 cent a share, hoping to be able to continue development and furnish employment. The management is firm in the belief that metal prices will come back to normal and are preparing themselves accordingly. Present work is confined to the 1,250 Level, where lead values are considerably higher than on the levels above, and the ore carries some gold. The 950, 1,100, and 1,170 levels, also prove the vein and hold large tonnages of ore that will be mined later. I~. L. Cromer is general superintendent at Eureka.
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Gold values are increasing in the crosscut being driven from the 600-foot vertical shaft of the Emerald Mining Company at Mammoth, Utah, Fred Wahlburg, superintendent. From 20 cents to $1 reported last November the gold content has increased to $6 to $18 a ton. The heading is nearing the old Diamond Shaft, from which considerable gold ore has been mined several years ago, and which is the objective of the crosscut.
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Considerable ore, that averages 30 percent lead, 10 ounces silver, and 40 cents in gold, has been developed by lessees in the Tetro claims, of the Plutus Mining Company, in the Tintic District. The ore is in a winze, 860 feet below the main tunnel of the Tetro workings, which are about 1,700 feet from the old No. 3 Shaft of the Chief Consolidated Mining Company. Arrangements are being made to ship the ore. Cecil Fitch, Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, Utah, is vice-president and general manager of both the Chief Consolidated and Plutus.
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The Utah Copper Company has made a substantial payment to the Bingham Metals Company for dumping rights. While the exact sum has not been made public, it is understood that it is sufficient to complete the development outlined for the 900 and 1,125 levels during this year. The 900 Drift is believed to have entered the Armstrong fissure, but considerable work will have to be done before the fissure can definitely be determined. The vertical shaft has been sunk to a depth of 1,125 feet, and a station is being cut there, from which the Smith No. 2, the East, and the Armstrong fissures will be explored. Gibson Berry is president and general manager of Bingham Metals.
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The Little May Mining Company, Axel Anderson, superintendent, Eureka, Utah, is sinking a winze on the Eureka Standard fissure, cut 989.5 feet east of the portal of the main Rothchild Tunnel. On the tunnel level, the fissure has been followed 223 feet northwesterly, and is mineralized throughout the entire distance. The hanging wall is porphyry, and the footwall is monzonite, and assays taken along the vein show from .01 to .06 ounces gold, 2 to 7 ounces silver and a trace of copper. The winze has followed the vein to a depth of 22 feet and a steady increase has been found in the value of the ore. One of the greatest assets in the development of the mine is the seven-inch churn drill hole that was sunk from the surface, to the Rothchild Tunnel, last May. It has supplied excellent ventilation.
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A well-mineralized fissure has been cut in Mississippian limestone formation, by the Northwest Crosscut, which the Star of Utah Mining Company has been advancing towards the Naildriver fissure. The newly opened fissure is seven feet between walls, and according to Superintendent John D. Fisher of Park City, has excellent indications for opening an ore body.
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L. B. Glafcke, who is superintending the property of the Frisco Silver Lead Mining Company, at Frisco, Utah, has returned from Salt Lake City, where he conferred with President L. F. Block, at 526 Atlas Building, and with officials of the Union Pacific railway, regarding carrying ore from Frisco, to the Salt lake smelters. All that stands in the way of production is to let the contracts for trucking the ore from the mine, to Frisco. More than 800 tons of zinc-lead ore, and 15 tons of silver-lead ore, await shipment now. The zinc-lead ore has been mined from the Double-Barrel Drift, in the King David property, operated under lease, and assays 85 percent zinc, and from 8 to 12 percent lead. Since it is sulphide, it will probably attract the attention of the paint companies.
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The Utah Lead Company, Jacob W. Young, mine superintendent, Marysvale, Utah, has resumed development with a force of 12 men. Some diamond drilling will be done to prospect the limestone beds below the Bully Boy Tunnel. The company controls 28 patented mining claims, and millsites in the Ohio Mining District, seven miles from Marysvale, including the original Bully Boy and Dalton claims. The Dalton is equipped with a small mill and a tramway connects it with the Bully Boy, a mile distant. Power for development is furnished by the Telluride Power Company.
rehab

UTAH MINING NEWS TMJ 2 28 1931

MINING JOURNAL 2 28 1931

UTAH

The latest report from the Chief Consolidated Mining Company, Cecil Fitch, General Manager, Dooly Block, Salt Lake City, Utah, is that ore assaying 30 percent lead and 10 ounces silver, has been opened in the Plutus Mine. The discovery was made in a winze 360 feet below the main tunnel, and 1,700 feet from the old No. 2 Shaft. Arrangements are being made to start shipping the ore.
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What is regarded the most promising showing since the ground came under its present management, has been opened by the Star of Utah Mining Company, at Park City, Utah. The discovery was made near the 3,000-foot point in the main development tunnel, and is 16 to 18 inches of galena. This is one of the enterprises being fostered by Charles Moore of Yuba City, California, and John D. Fisher is in charge of this particular branch.
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The United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, D. D. Muir, Jr., Manager, Newhouse Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, in the near future will repair one of its hoists. While the repairs are being made, the Midvale Plant may be closed down, but not for more than two days. The rumor that the plant might close for 10 days, or indefinitely, has been denied by the management.
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E. F. Birch, President and General Manager of the Sioux Mines Company, at Eureka, Utah, has made arrangements for a diamond drill, which will be used in prospecting, from the 400-foot raise driven above the 2,200 Level of the adjoining Iron Blossom ground. The raise was driven in Sioux ground and its last 30 feet passed through a quartz formation that gives excellent promise of ore. The Sioux management has prospected with drills on two other occasions with good results.
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The Utah Bunker Hill Mining Company, John V. Long, General Manager, 425 Felt Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is continuing its tunnel with average speed, to gain a depth of 600 feet on the fissures that averaged $29 a ton in lead, silver and gold, from surface shipments. The tunnel is known as the 725-foot Level, and upon reaching the intersection of the fissures, it is planned to sink a winze to a depth of about 300 feet. Commercial ore has been opened at 18 points in the company’s 28 lode claims, and one of the seven shipments made, carried ore as rich as $52.75 a ton.
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Rich lead ore has been opened on the 900 Level of the Tintic Bullion Mine, by the North Lily Mining Company, that has all indications of developing into an important source of reserves. The ore is two feet wide and is farther west than any heretofore found in the property. It is believed to be a parallel channel to the main North Lily sulphide ore body. J. S. Finlay of Eureka, Utah, is Superintendent of mine operations.
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Bunches of ore, assaying up to 50 ounces silver, .12 ounces gold, and 22 percent copper, have been opened in the Eureka Bullion Mine, of the Chief Consolidated Mining Company, which is under lease to the North Lily-Knight Company. The operating company is centering its attention on the development of the Eureka Bullion ground, and in sinking a deep shaft in the Big Hilt property, to the Ophir formation. J. O. Elton, 818 Kearns Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, is General Manager of the company.
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Work has been resumed on the Ruby Mine, in Box Elder Canyon, near Brigham City, Utah, according to Leo J. Nielsen, General Manager, and timber and other materials are on hand to continue the tunnel, already in several hundred feet. The mine had been closed down several months.
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The Park City Consolidated Mining Company, J. J. Beeson, general manager, 502 Scott Building, Salt Lake City, Utah, has opened an ore body on the 900-foot level of its property at Park City, that has the appearance of developing into a valuable source of revenue. The strike was made 273 feet from the intersection of the Roosevelt and Silver veins. Where cut, the vein was four feet wide, and samples carried 80 ounces silver to the ton, but with further development, the vein has widened to five feet, and the entire face carries approximately 40 ounces silver to the ton. The 57 men employed, accepted a 25-cent cut in daily wages, rather than reduce the payroll, which appeared necessary in order that the company continue operations. Very little stoping wilt be done until the silver market improves.
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rehab

utah mining news emj 10 28 1922

UTAH MINING NEWS  EMJ 10 28 1922

Calcium Arsenate Plant in Utah Nearing Completion; New Enterprise to Make Salt Needed to Combat the Boll Weevil in Southern Cotton Fields —  E&MJ  OCTOBER 28, 1922

The plant of the Salt Lake Insecticide Co., which is being built at Salt Lake City, to produce calcium arsenate from the ores of the Western Utah Copper mine, at Gold Hill, Utah, is approaching completion. In spite of delays in the arrival of machinery and material, it is hoped to begin the treatment of ore about the middle of December. A good demand for the material is expected; particularly as indications are that the supply of foreign arsenic is not nearly as large as has been estimated. Indicative of the growing need for the product, is the damage to the cotton crop of the south, from the depredations of insects. The production of cotton has been reduced from 11,000,000, to 6,000,000 bales, in the last six months, largely on account of the boll weevil, which can be combated with arsenic poison, according to the U, S. Department of Agriculture. Frank K. Cameron is originator of the process to be used, and manager of the plant.
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Utah  E&MJ  OCTOBER 28, 1922
Iron Blossom Pays Dividend — Lambourne Properties Are Listed on Salt Lake Exchange

Salt Lake City—The Columbia Steel Corporation, according to one of its officials, has secured title (with the the exception of railroad rights across. the ground) to 600 acres of land, lying north of the town of Springville, near Utah Lake. The tract is crossed by four railroad lines—the Orem Electric;. Denver & Rio Grande Western; Los Angeles & Salt Lake (Now UPRR); and the Utah Railroad. The Columbia Steel Corporation, as has already been stated in these columns, is seeking to exploit iron and coal deposits in southern Utah.  California and Utah men are interested.
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Eureka—Tintic shipments for the week, ended Oct. 14, amounted to 157 cars, compared with 160, the week preceding. Shippers were: Chief Consolidated, 37 cars; Tintic Standard, 38; Grand Central, 22; Dragon Consolidated, 12; Iron Blossom, 11; Colorado, 11; Eagle & Blue Bell, 9; Victoria, 8; Swansea, 8; Empire Mine, 3; Centennial-Eureka, 2; Bullion Beck, 1; Eureka Hill, 1; Joe Bocoers, 1; Tintic Drain Tunnel, 1; American Star, 1; Gemini, 1. There were also shipped by the Chief Consolidated, 12 cars of limestone, and 17 cars of road material.
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UTAH MINING NEWS M&S PRESS MAY 14 1921

MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS May 14, 1921

UTAH

Eureka.—The recent strike on the 925-ft. level at the Eureka Bullion mine, is the most important development in the history of the company. A shipment of 40 tons has been made, which averaged $2.40 in gold, 60 oz. in silver, and 2.5% lead. The place from which the ore is being taken, is about 112 ft. from the winze sunk from the 800-ft. level, according to John Bestlemeyer, manager. Two headings are being driven for the development of the ore, which comes in a northeast-southwest break. Ore is showing in both headings, for a width of four or five feet. Shipments from this district, for the week ending April 30, totaled 126 cars, an increase of 6 over the previous week.

The Tintic Standard shipped 47; Chief Consolidated, 34; Iron King, 17; Dragon, 9; Iron Blossom, 8; Alaska, 3; Eagle & Blue Bell, 3; Swansea, 2; Mammoth, 1; Colorado, 1; Victoria, 1.

Work of installing a compressor at the Tintic Standard property has been completed. This is one of the largest compressors in the State, having a capacity of 2750 cu. ft. of air per minute; it is situated at the No. 2 shaft. When the transformers are received and installed, the management plans to begin No. 3 shaft, as the two present shafts are unable properly to handle the tonnage of ore, and waste from the mine.
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Frlsco.—Regular shipments are being made from the Quad-Metals mine in this district, according to Grant Snyder, Manager of the property. High-grade ore is being taken from the 700-ft. level, the deepest working in the mine. The last shipment to a Salt Lake Valley smelter averaged nearly 100 oz. Silver, and 48% lead, netting the company $2700 for 27 tons.
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Garfield—The Garfield smelter is continuing operations, in spite of the complete cessation of operations at the Utah Copper Co.  At present, two reverberatory furnaces and one converter are in operation. The company recently made a large reduction in number of employees. At present the force numbers about 350. So far as local officials are aware, no shut-down of the plant is contemplated.
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Moab—The Tungsten Products Co., which owns and operates the extensive carnotite [uranium ore] properties in Dry Valley, has been consolidated with the Radium Company, of Colorado, according to H. K. Thurber, field manager for the former company. The enlarged concern will be the largest producer of carnotite ores in the world. There soon will be an increase in production from the Dry Valley and Gateway mines.
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Park City.—Ore shipments from the district for the week ending April 30, totaled 1450 tons, as compared with 1321 tons for the preceding period. The Judge companies shipped 761 tons; Silver King Coalition, 586; and the Ontario, 103.
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UTAH MINING NEWS Mining &Scientific PRESS MAY 1 1920

May 1, 1920 MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS

UTAH

OPHIR CANYON IS BEING PROSPECTED.

Garfield —Fifteen machine-shop workers, at the Arthur plant of the Utah Copper Co., quit work on April 17, after submitting a statement that they did not “want to work on unfair castings that are in the shop”. It seems that the men involved in the walk-out, objected to machining castings that were made in foundries in Salt Lake City, which are now on the ‘open shop’ basis, following a strike some months ago.  R. C. Gemmell, general manager, gave out a vigorous statement, to the effect that from its very inception, the Utah Copper Co. has maintained a free shop for free men, and has never discriminated between employees because they are, or are not, members of any lawful religious, political, or labor organization; that the company has always adhered to an open-shop policy, which has been accepted by the employees of the company, and will continue to do so, to the full extent of its ability and resources.

Mr. Gemmell further stated that it was his belief that the men who quit, did so with great reluctance, and that the walk-out was forced upon them, and engineered by outside union organizers of Salt Lake City; that unscrupulous and reckless men, under the guise of labor leadership, are fomenting discord and industrial strife, in their efforts to obtain power and control over the men they appoint themselves to represent; to such as these, the ‘closed shop’ would be a potent weapon, and in their control, a menace to every principle of American government and individual liberty.
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OPHIR —Work under way in this camp indicates a big revival of mining, and it is expected that the coming summer will be the most active, since the days when millions of dollars worth of ore was mined and smelted here. As a result of the work done during the past eleven months, the geology of the district has been revealed to such an extent that a large area of virgin ground seems available. The ore bodies in this district occur as replacements of certain limestones, which are traversed by northeast and north fissures. Most of the output heretofore has come from the mines on Ophir Hill, which is on the north side of the canyon. On the south side, is what is known as Lion Hill.
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On the property of the Ophir Central, on Lion Hill, W. S. Elliott has been driving several diamond-drill holes. It is reported that these holes have been the means of correlating the structure on the two sides of the fault, and it has been determined that the Lion Hill side dropped down approximately 600 ft.  The Ophir Central company has a hoist, compressor, and other necessary machinery, and in a short time will begin sinking a shaft near the town, to open up under Lion Hill, the lime strata which has been so productive on the opposite side.
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The largest of the mines on Ophir Hill, is the Ophir Hill Consolidated, which is owned by W. A. Clark of Montana, and to date, has paid $12,000,000 in dividends. Work is being actively carried on at the Ophir Metals property, the tunnel being in a distance of 548 ft. from the portal, and it is expected that the objective limestone will be cut at a distance of 800 ft. The tunnel is now progressing at an average rate of seven feet per day.
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PARK City.—Entrance of the United States Smelting, Refining & Mining Co. into the district, is considered one of the most important events in the history of Park City. This company has taken a bond and lease, upon the property of the American Flag Mining Co., which adjoins the Silver King Coalition on the east, and the Ontario on the south. At present, the United States company is carrying on diamond-drilling work on the 1100-ft. level, and following up stringers of ore. In 1903, the American Flag company was organized to develop 22 claims, embracing approximately 300 acres, and since that time, has produced in the neighborhood of $500,000 in high-grade silver-gold ore. The ore contained little, or no lead, was of a uniformly high grade, with a highly silicious gangue.

Based on current prices for silver, the lowest grade ore ever shipped from the property would be worth $40 per ton; a number of shipments having been made that averaged from 68 to 252 oz. Silver, per ton, and from $8.80 to $29 per ton, in gold. Since the Ontario Drain Tunnel lies 210 ft. below the lowest level attained in the American Flag Mine, officials of the company believe that difficulties with water will be negligible. The formation is quartzite with two veins, one called the ‘Main’ and the other the ‘Easter’, which intersect, both on their dip and their strike. Most of the development work has been done in the Main Vein, where a shaft was sunk to a depth of 1060 ft., with a sump 60 ft. below this depth. Approximately a mile of laterals has been run on the different levels.

On the eleventh level, 60 ft. below the 1000-ft. level, a stratum of limestone about 30 ft. thick, was cut. In this stratum, the enrichment, which had been considered excellent in the quartzite, became even stronger, and it was in this bed, that some of the best grade of ore was mined.

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Notices have been posted by the Silver King Coalition, Ontario, and Daly mines, to the effect, that beginning April 15, the companies would allow two extra shifts, to all employees, who work twenty-eight continuous shifts in a month. For some weeks past, the Judge Mining & Smelting Co. has had a somewhat similar bonus system in operation. Like all other mining districts in the state, there is a shortage of miners in this camp, and several hundred more miners could be used here. The local mining companies are doing everything possible for the comfort of their employees, as a means of keeping them steadily employed.
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EMJ 08261922 UTAH MINING NEWS

August 26, 1922 Engineering and Mining Journal-Press 389

AUGUST 26, 1922

UTAH

Utah Zinc Co.’s Plant to Run at Full Capacity—Utah Central to Build Fifty-Mile Branch
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Park City—Shipments for the week ended Aug. 12 were: Ontario, 1,383 tons; Silver King Coalition, 1,005; Park-Utah, 968; Judge, Daly, and Daly West, 483.
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Murray—The new plant of the Utah Zinc Co., operation of which was started June 15, will be brought up to its capacity of 300 tons of zinc oxide monthly, within a few days. This company, which was organized about two years ago, is backed by Utah men.

Operation was deemed inadvisable for some time after completion of the company’s plant, owing to market conditions. However, profitable operation is now expected. Most of the ore for the plant is coming from the Tecoma mine, near the Utah-Nevada line on the Western and Southern Pacific railroads, and from Ely, Nev.
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Salt Lake City—The Utah Central Railroad Co., which proposes to construct a fifty-mile line to the new coal fields in Emery County, has filed with the Public Utilities Commission of Utah, a copy of its application with the Interstate Commerce Commission, for a certificate of convenience and necessity to construct such a line, asking the commission to indicate its desire within ten days as to representation or hearings. The application is signed by James H. Mays, Harry L. Gandy, and Thomas C. Bradley, who represent the Utah Central railroad company, in process of organization under the laws of South Dakota.

The application sets forth, among other things, that the proposed new line will have as its termini the coal mines situated in Huntington and tributary canyons, and will follow a general northeasterly direction through or near the towns of Huntington, Desert Lake, and Cleveland, to the town of Wellington on the Rio Grande Western R.R. and by branch line from a point on said proposed line between the towns of Cleveland and Wellington, will connect with the Utah railroad at or near Utah Railroad Junction, Utah, which will be the end of the line.
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Eureka—Tintic shipments for the week ended Aug. 12 amount to 147 cars. Shippers were: Chief Consolidated, 40 cars; Tintic Standard, 83; Colorado, 16; Iron Blosson, 14; Victoria, 10; Grand Central, 9; Mammoth, 4; Centennial-Eureka, 4; Dragon, 2; Bullion Beck, 2; and Tintic Drain Tunnel, 1.
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M&E WORLD 12 30 1916 UTAH MINING NEWS

MINING AND ENGINEERING WORLD 1127   DECEMBER 30, 1916

UTAH.

Murray.
The Red Bell Mining Co has been formed, and is capitalized for 800,000 shares with par value of 10 cts. Half of the stock has been placed in the treasury.  S. A. Parry is president of the company, M. E. Price, vice-president: H. H. Harris, secretary and treasurer. These, with George H. Webb and William L. Parry compose the directorate.

On the property there are three contacts that meet. The formation is quartzite, porphyry, and limestone.  The formation is cut by northeast, and southwest fissures, and the contact from the Cardiff can be found on the property. On the surface one of the fissures shows considerable mineralization.  At present, the company has two men at work on a tunnel that is being driven through the porphyry to cut the fissure. The tunnel is now in 50 ft. The properties are in the Big Cottonwod district, at the mouth of Butler’s Fork.
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Milford.
At the Creole, operations are now being handled on company account. The management expects that as soon as construction work is concluded on additions to the boarding and bunk houses, so that a greater force of miners can he accommodated, the production can be increased to 4 cars a week. The management is working to have the mine equipped with compressor and power drills soon.

Five teams are busy hauling 3 to 4 tons at each load, between the mine and Milford. These operations have been somewhat retarded by cold weather. Ten miners, during the last week, were getting a car out every 3½ days. While putting up a raise from the 100 level, a vein of azurite and malachite was encountered which is expected to run 30% copper.
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Alta.
Alta Con, is pushing a drift on the bedded vein from the Copper Prince tunnel, in Michigan-Utah ground. At 200 ft. lower and 600 ft. east of where the vein was opened on Alta Con, the drift was started 500 ft. from the portal of the Copper Prince tunnel. It was only in 40 ft. when the whole face was in sulphide, which assays show to run from 6 to 14% copper, 14 ozs. silver and 60 cts. gold. The vein is from 20 to 45 ft. wide.
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Garfield.
Charles W. Whitley, manager of the local plants of the American Smelting & Refining company, says that the work now under way will more than double the capacity of the plant. It was originally built to handle 2500 tons of ore daily, and has already been augmented to a small degree, but when the work now under way is completed, the plant will have a capacity of 6000 tons.

Increasing of the power line capacity, the building of new furnaces, and the construction of a plant for the manufacture of sulphuric acid, are included in the changes. The company, which now has more than 1500 men at this plant, is building a central bathhouse, with lockers. A refrigerating plant for community use is another of the advancements put forward by the company for the employees.
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Eureka.
The North Standard Mining Co. has been incorporated for 1,000,000 shares, par value 10 cts., with 500,000 shares in the treasury. The officers and directors are: Levi N. Harmon, president; J, H. Manson, vice-president; John Dorius, secretary and treasurer;
George H. Taylor, director, and F. M. Whitney, director. The company was organized to take over certain claims in North Tintic, 1 mile north of the Tintic Standard. It consists of 6 claims owned outright, and a bond and lease on 2 claims on which there has been considerable work done in the way of tunnels, drifts, etc., and a shaft of about 285 ft.
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Tintic Standard is operating 3 shifts and expects to increase production to one car a day. On the 1600 level, the miners have finished cutting out the sill floor, and stoping operations are going on. The 1600 level is vertically about 1275 ft. below surface, as the last few hundred feet have been on an incline. The new hoisting engine is expected to be running soon. The miners who have a contract for sinking the shaft will then be able to make better progress. Last month they made about 125 ft., and the shaft has passed the 200 level.
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American Forks.
John Cleghorn, superintendent of development on the Belerophon, and Silver Wave, is opening up from 2 to 5 ft. of ore that carries silver, lead and gold values of better than $100 per ton, with 12 ft. of milling ore having values of $35. The Greene Leasing Co., operating the Live Yankee, located in the gulch between the Belerophon and Silver Wave, is making regular shipments of high grade.
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The Utah Power & Light Co. completed stringing wire on its 7-mile line, from the Snake Creek power plant, to the Dutchman mine, recently. The power was primarily brought over the divide to supply power for the Pacific mill, which will be in operation some time during the coming week.
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Leasers of the Pacific are shipping, and meeting with considerable success. The ore comes from the copper stope in the north end of the workings. Assays on some of the ore, show 1500 ozs. silver, and over 20% copper. Conservative estimates are that the ore will average $150.
During the past week the miners have drifted north on the old tipper workings, and made connections with the raise from the copper stope. This gives three connections from the tunnel level with the workings above, and affords ample air in all parts of the mine, which will enable the property to be worked to its maximum capacity, when the mill starts next week.
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EMJ 11 20 1920 UTAH MINING NEWS

November 20, 1920 ENGINEERING, AND MINING JOURNAL

UTAH

Bingham—The directors of the Bingham Minus company—owning the Dalton & Lark and Yosemite mines at Bingham, and Victoria at Tintic, and controlling the Eagle & Blue Bell, at Tintic—propose, with the consent of the stockholders, to purchase 50,000 shares at $10 per share, to be held as treasury stock.
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Eureka—The Tintic Standard during October shipped 150 cars of an average tonnage of 55 tons, the ore coming from three different stopes. More ore could have been shipped with more railroad cars available.
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Park City — Park City shipments amounted to 1,843 tons, as compared with 1,634 tons the week preceding.

The Silver King Coalition plans a company store, providing supplies to its employees at cost. Labor conditions at the camp are improving, and the company has opened a new ore zone of promise.

The Judge Mining & Smelting Co. will add coal to its store’s commodities, expecting this to reduce the price of fuel to its employees by about $4 a ton.
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M&S PRESS 04 17 1920 UTAH MINING NEWS

April 17 1920  MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS

UTAH

ALTA.
An unfortunate accident occurred here on the morning of April 5, when a large snowslide swept down from the property of the Sells Mining Co., and carried everything before it on the property of the Wasatch Mines Co. One miner, the steward at the auxiliary plant of the Wasatch Company, and his wife, were killed. For years it has been the belief of the Wasatch mine officials that the buildings at the auxiliary plant were absolutely safe from slides.

They were situated on a knoll, and from one direction they were protected by a gulch, and then by a large clump of trees. The rushing mass, with a roar heard for miles, crossed this gulch and swept up the incline, tearing immense trees from their roots, and reducing the boarding and bunk-house to kindling. It then switched its course, and passed directly between several other buildings, including the compressor-house, transformer-station, powder-house, and machine and blacksmith-shop, which were not damaged.

This is the third snowslide to occur in this district within 30 days; the first having been on March 7, near Lake Solitude, and the second on March 20 near the Peruvian mine. In these two slides, four men were killed, making seven lives that have been lost in the three slides.
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PARK CITY
Another shipment of  premium spelter was made by the Judge Mining & Smelting Co. during the week ending April 3. Ore shipments for the same period totaled 2095 tons, as compared with 2206 tons for the previous week. The Ontario Silver shipped 616 tons; Silver Ring Coalition, 605; Judge M. & 5., 440; Daly-West, 233; Daly, 108; and Naildriver, 60 tons.

As an inducement to steady work, the Judge company is now paying a bonus to men working thirteen consecutive days. Every employee who puts in thirteen days is paid for fourteen days work. It is likely that other companies here will adopt a similar plan, as the present scarcity of good miners is a great drawback.
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The new pump at the Iowa Copper has been placed and started on April 4. It is being used to un-water the shaft and drift, and within a short time, work in the face of the drift will be resumed. This property is now equipped for extensive work. Owing to the deep snows, eleven days time was required to get the new pumping equipment from the station to the mine, the snow being six feet deep in places.
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J. B. Allen, manager of the Glenallen property, reports that a new ore body was struck on March 31. Sufficient work has not been done to determine the size of the vein, but samples so far taken indicate first-class ore.
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EUREKA
Ore shipments from the Tintic district, for the week ending April 3, totaled 151 cars, a decrease of 13 from the previous week. Inclement weather and bad roads were, in part, responsible for this decrease. Influenza at Mammoth, a section of the camp which has been immune to past epidemics, seriously checked operations at several of the adjacent mines.
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The Chief Consolidated shipped 39 cars; Tintic Standard, 20; Dragon Con., 20; Eagle & Blue Bell, 11; Iron Blossom, 10; Centennial-Eureka, 8; Gemini, 7; Mammoth, 6; Grand Central, 6; Victoria, 6; Colorado, 5; Bullion Beck; 3; Empire Mines, 3; May Day, 2; Ridge & Valley, 2; Swansea, 2; Alaska, 1.

 THE TINTIC STANDARD MINE, IN THE EAST TINTIC DISTRICT, UTAH
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During the past week, prominent mining operators of this district met with members of the Eureka volunteer fire department, and a plan was formulated whereby the firemen, many of whom are miners, will take special training in mine-rescue work. The mining companies will supply the equipment, and will pay a competent man to train those selected to take the lead, paying the firemen for the time they spend in training, and in carrying out rescue work.
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The fire-department apparatus will probably be used in case of serious mine accidents and, in this manner, the trained men could be sent to almost any mine in the district within a few minutes’ time. Only the mines of Eureka, Mammoth, and Silver City will be interested in the proposition which has been submitted to the department; such properties as the Tintic Standard and others, in the eastern part of the district, being too far away from Eureka to participate in such an arrangement.
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The Tintic Standard will likely secure its own equipment and keep a number of men properly trained. Heretofore, each mine has had its own ‘safety-first’ department; but the operators feel that a co-operative system would be more efficient in affording effectual action in case of emergency.
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The shalt at the North Beck Mining Co.’s property has reached a depth of 1620 ft. Sinking has been discontinued, and miners are now cutting a large station on the 1600-ft. level, which is the point selected by E. J. Raddatz, manager, for prospecting. This company owns a large tract of ground, which is just north of the town proper. Mr. Raddatz is also developing the Victoria Gold Mining Co. property, adjoining the North Beck, and the main inclined shaft, which was sunk to a depth of 500 ft. a few years ago, is being deepened.
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During 1919, but little progress was made at the Colorado Consolidated mine, which in by-gone days, was the premier property of the camp. The value of the ore shipped was $107,485.  According to the annual report, the revenue of the company was spent on exploration work which did not give satisfactory results, and such work was discontinued at the close of the year.

The development work done during 1919 was undertaken primarily for the purpose of determining geological conditions, which it was hoped would be of value in further search for new ore bodies.  The mine is now being worked under the leasing system, cleaning up old stopes.
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M&S PRESS 06 18 1921 UTAH MINING NEWS

June 18, 1921 MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS

UTAH

Alta.
After a long winter, during which more snow has fallen than for many years, the mines in this camp are resuming activity.  The Little Cottonwood Transportation Co.’s railroad has been cleared of snow, and the equipment overhauled.
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Shipments of ore have been started from the South Hecla property. O. H. Watson, manager, states that he expects to ship between 6000 and 7000 tons of ore during the Summer. The ore-bins, and all available storing areas, are full of ore which has been mined during the past few months.
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The tramway at the Michigan-Utah has been repaired and shipments will be made this Summer.
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Eureka.
The Apex-Standard Mining Co. has secured control of the Tintic-Zenith and Tintic-Eastern properties, according to Louis Merriman, manager of the Apex Standard. At the same time, announcement was made that the control of the Tlntic Union property has passed to the Apex Standard, but it is not certain that the Tintic Union will be merged with the other three properties.

The management is pleased with recent development work on the 900-ft. level of the Apex Standard, and it is planned to put on a second shift. Walter Fitch, president of the Chief Consolidated, has acquired a substantial interest in the Apex Standard.
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Shipments of ore from this district, for the week ending June 4, totaled 119 cars, as compared with 123 cars for the preceding week. The Tintic Standard shipped 44 cars; Chief Consolidated, 38;  Eagle & Blue Bell, 7; Iron Blossom, 6; Iron King, 6: Dragon, 6; Victoria, 4; Gemini, 2; Alaska, 2; Colorado, 2; Swansea, 2.
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During May, the shaft at the Independence Mining Co. was sunk a total of 60 ft., with but one shift on the work. The company is paying $23 per foot to the contractors engaged on this work, 25% of which is payable in stock of the company.
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Park City.
The controversy between the American Smelting & Refining Co. and the Silver King Coalition Mines Co., regarding increase in smelting rates, has been adjusted entirely to the satisfaction of both corporations. W. Mont Ferry, managing director of the Silver King Coalition, states that shipments have been resumed, and all probability of any litigation, entirely precluded. It is stated that the smelting contract held by the Silver King Coalition, is one of the best smelting contracts, from the producers’ standpoint, now in force.
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George W. Lambourne, president and general manager of the Daly-West Mining Co., reports that the differences between his company, and the. A. S. & R. have not been adjusted.  C. W. Whitley, vice-president of the A. S. & R., has been In Utah, and had several conferences with officials of both mining companies.
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Ore shipments from this district, for the week ending June 4, totaled 1097 tons, of which the Judge Allied companies shipped 611; Ontario, 288; Silver King Coalition, 218.  
Shipments the previous week, totaled 993 tons.
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Salt Lake City.
Announcement was made on June 5, of the reduction from $22 to $16.50 per ton, in freight-rates, on bullion from Utah smelting points to the Atlantic seaboard. The reduction means much to local mining operators; in reality, it is a return to the rate effective up to Angust 26, 1920. On that date, the $22 rate, which was a 33% increase, became effective, and local smelting companies immediately deducted approximately one cent, per ounce, on silver, and one-quarter cent per pound, on lead contents, to cover the additional freight on bullion.
It is the opinion of local operators that this charge,  will now be cancelled by the smelting companies. The announcement of the reduction in freight on bullion, coupled with a price of 5 cents per pound for lead, has created a more cheerful feeling.
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The directors of the Utah Copper Co. declared a dividend of 50 cents per share on June 9. This will call for the distribution of $812,245. On March 31, the company paid a dividend of $1 per share, and during 1920, distributions were at the rate of $1.50 per quarter. The grand total of dividend disbursements to date is $118,946,397.50.
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July 30, 1921 MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS

UTAH
Alta.
Owing to surface water at the Louise mine, there has been a temporary change in development plans, according to R. O. Dobbs, general manager. A body of shipping ore is exposed in the Maggie raise, and as soon as the water recedes, mining will be undertaken.  While waiting an opportunity to mine in the Maggie raise, development will be carried on in the 1200-ft. level.
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The Columbus-Rexall Company has cut in the No. 8 stopes, the best body of ore yet discovered. It is said that this showing compares favorably with some of the best ore found in the Cardiff mine, adjoining the Columbus-Rexall.
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Big Cottonwood Canyon.
Four teams are now employed by the Woodlawn Mining Co., in transporting silver-lead ore from the mine, to the railway spur.  It is said that after deducting transportation and smelting charges, there is a margin of $19 per ton in the shipments made so far this season. An eight-foot bed of ore was recently opened in what is known as the ‘West’ drift, which gives average returns of $40 to $50 per ton.
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Eureka.
Shipments of ore from this district for the week, ending July 16, totaled 129 cars, of which the Tlntic Standard shipped 42; Chief Consolidated, 82; Iron King, 12; Eagle & Blue Bell, 12; Victoria, 10; Dragon, 8; Iron Blossom, 6; Swansea, 2; Mammoth, 2; Gold Chain, 1; Eureka Hill, 1. Shipments the previous week totaled 156 cars.
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Soon after August 1, the Tintic Mining Co. will be getting a substantial tonnage of mill-ore from the Swansea property, according to Theodore F. Holt, superintendent for the milling company. The shaft has been retimbered to the 500-ft. level, and that level is now being cleared, after a long period of inactivity. The milling company has been receiving ore recently from the Horn Silver Mine at Frisco, Utah.
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The directors of the Little May Mining Co. have decided to equip the property with an up-to-date plant, consisting of a compressor, hoist, pumping machinery, and drills, all to be electrically driven. Recent development work at the property has been encouraging. Several streaks of high-grade are have been cut, one of which is two feet in width, and averages $1.40 gold, 24 oz. silver, and 14% copper. Five cars of ore have been shipped.
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At the Iron King property, 32 men are now employed. The upper levels of the mine are leased to the American Smelting & Refining Co., and the work there is under the direction of Alfred Frank, the well-known mining engineer of Salt Lake City, with B. H. Grant, acting as superintendent. The royalty from ore shipped from this part of the property, is paying for practically all of the development work carried on by the Iron King company, for its own account.
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The second quarterly report, for 1921, of E. S. Raddatz, general manager for the Tlntic Standard Mining Co., indicates a profit of $4.60 per ton of ore, before allowance for taxes and depreciation. The gross value of shipments of 24,566 tons of ore for the quarter was $812,577.02, or $38.07 per ton. Smelter deductions and treatment charges were $14.41 per ton; freight charges, $4.19 per ton; production cost and development, $10.01 per ton.

Net earnings for the quarter were $113,179.26, as compared with $54,444.26 for the three months preceding. The report states that the company’s new mill, which has been brought to capacity of 100 tons daily, is treating ores with a head of 15 oz. sliver, making a recovery of 81.2% of the silver content, or 11.36 oz. per ton. No mill costs are stated.

A new six-room brick assay-office and laboratory was erected and July 30, 1921, two large new ventilating fans were installed on the 1200-and 1450-ft. levels, and the foundation for the new large air-compressor was completed. The predominating value of the milling ore being silver, the mill was designed and constructed for the purpose of extracting and saving the highest possible percentage of the silver content in the ore. During May and June the silver extraction was 81.2%.
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Park City
Paul Hunt, superintendent of the Park-Utah mine, reports that the water in the Ontario drain-tunnel is gradually receding. Measurements taken the middle of July, show that 25.4 second-feet is flowing from the portal of the tunnel. Work in the Park-Utah is handicapped. When the flow is again normal, mining will be resumed.
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MAP OF UTAH
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Sixty men have been employed in grading, excavating, and doing cement work and carpentering for the new mill to be erected by the Silver King Coalition Mines Co., to replace the one destroyed by fire, last January. The first carload of steel for the plant arrived on July 15.  
Development work in the mine is reported as highly satisfactory; the company now has about 300 men on its payroll. The new milling plant will have a capacity of 450 tons per day, and is expected to be in operation late this year.
The output of ore from mines in this district, during the week ending July 16, totaled 1475 tons, as compared with 1267 tons for the preceding week. The Silver King Coalition shipped 767 tons; Judge Allied Companies, 364 tons; and the Ontario, 344 tons.
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Stockton.
The shaft being sunk at the property of the Stockton Standard Mining Co. has reached a point 325 ft. below the collar, at which point the cutting of a station has been started, according to C. F. Buehner, president. Sinking will be continued until the 400-ft. level is reached, when drifting will be undertaken to cut two fissures, which lie to the east.
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