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EMJ JANUARY 13 1917 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT
124  EMJ JANUARY 13 1917  MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW  
     
ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL    Vol. 103, No. 2

Percival Johnson has been made Director of the Pulaski Iron Co.
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C. M. Weld announces the removal of his office, to No. 2 Rector St., New York.
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Marshall O. Ortoer has removed his office to 213 Boston Building, Denver. Col.
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R. B. Marchant, Treasurer of J. G. White & Co., New York, was recently elected Vice-president of the company.
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J. B. Moore has accepted a position as Mine Manager, for the Tigre Mining Co,. at Esqueda, Sonora, Mexico.
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H. M. Beattie—We have received an inquiry for the address of Mr. Beattie, who was in Chicago, in 1912.
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Dyke V. Keedy has gone to South America on professional business.  He expects to be absent about three months.
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Heath Steele has been elected President of the Mining and Development Co., with head offices at 60 Broadway. New York.
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E. S. Christiansen has been appointed Manager of the Detroit office, of the United Smelting and Aluminum Co., of New Haven. Conn.
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Persifor G. Spilsbury left New York, on Dec. 28, for an Inspection trip to the Joplin and Oklahoma zinc fields, and then to Arizona.
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F. B. Tough has resigned his position with the Kern Trading and Oil Co., in order to enter the Petroleum Division, of the U. S. Bureau of Mines.
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K. C. Li. president of the Hunan Government Lead Smelting Works, was recently in San Francisco to purchase machinery and supplies.
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Mark R. Lamb, for several years, Manager for Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. In South America, has resigned from the service of the company, and will return to the United States.
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R. N. Lyman has resigned as Mine Manager, for the Seneca-Superior Silver Mines, to become President, and Managing Director, of the Elliott-Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd., with offices at Cobalt. Ont.
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James MacNaughton, First Vice-president, and General Manager of the Calumet & Hecla, and subsidiaries, is at Houghton, Mich., from Boston and expects to remain a month or six weeks.
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James Lord has retired as President of the American Iron and Steel Manufacturing Co., of Lebanon. Penn., after 41 years of continuous activity In the iron and steel manufacturing business.
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Charles W. Henderson, the statistician in charge of the Denver office of the Geological Survey, is in Washington, conferring with H. D. McCaskey, the head of the Mineral Resources division, of the Survey.
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N. O. Lawton, manager for the Vermont Copper Co., South Strafford. Vt., left on Jan. 2, for a trip through the West, on professional business. He will visit prominent mines and mills, returning to Vermont about Feb. 1.
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Francis Church Lincoln, Director of the Mackay School of Mines, Reno. Nev., is at present, examining a copper mine in Ontario, Canada, and will return to Reno, about Jan. 8. 1917, to take up the work at the School of Mines.
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Captain E. N. Cory has been promoted to the position of Assistant Superintendent of the mines, of the Jones & Laughlin Ore Co., in the Michigan field. He was formerly in charge of the Rolling Mill mine, of the company, in Negaunee.
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John A. Davis, Superintendent of the Fairbanks, Alaska, Experiment Station, of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, is selecting his equipment in New York and Boston. before Leaving for Alaska, Mr. Davis will visit several of the stations of the Bureau of Mines.
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Frederick G. Clapp, petroleum engineer and geologist, addressed the Geological Society of America, at Albany, N. Y., on Dec. 28, 1916, on “Ethics of the Petroleum Geologist,” and “Revision of the Structural Classification of Petroleum and Natural Gas Fields.”
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George C. Hicks. Jr., Vice-president, and engineer for the P. H. & F. M. Roots Co., of Connersville, Ind., for the past 11 years, announces his retirement from the company, on Jan. 1, 1917.  Mr. Hicks will act as consulting engineer for the company for a short time.  Before taking up work again at some other company, he expects to take a six months’ vacation.
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Obituary -

Lieut. Gerald Galt, a mining engineer, son of Judge Galt, of Winnipeg, who was serving overseas with the Canadian Engineers, was instantly killed on Christmas night, by a shell. He was 29 years of age, and a graduate of the Toronto School of Practical Science. Previous to his enlistment, he was engaged in a large copper mine at Rancagua, Chile.
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Capt. John Trethewey, a retired mining engineer, died in Toronto on Christmas Day,  after a long illness, at the age of 77. He had during his active life, been identified with a number of mining enterprises, and for several years, was connected with the Silver Islet mine in the Lake Superior region. He was formerly a resident of Owen Sound, but came to Toronto, about ten years ago. He leaves a widow, three daughters, and two sons.
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George L. Wright, a pioneer mining man of Ouray County, died on Dec. 22, 1916. after a brief Illness brought on by an acute attack of kidney trouble. Mr. Wright made several large fortunes in mining, being among the first promoters of the big Sneffels mines, about 36 years ago. He still controlled many big properties in that district. Among them are the U. S. claims, which are traversed by the new Camp Bird tunnel, and which promised to bring him another large fortune. He was 75 years old. and is survived by his widow, who lives In Ouray, and by a brother, who lives in California. His passing marks the last of Ouray’s real old timers.
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William M. Gilliland, Chief mechanicaI engineer for Pickands, Mather & Co. in the Lake  Superior district, died in his office, in Duluth, Dec. 26, 1916. Death came suddenly from acute indigestion. He came to the Lake Superior district 14 years ago, taking a position as Assistant mechanical engineer for the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. at Ishpeming.

He left that company, to become Chief engineer for the Quincy Mining Co., in the copper district, going from there, to Douglas Ariz., to take charge of the machinery at the smelteries of the Calumet & Arizona Mining Co.

He returned to the Lake Superior district four years ago, to enter the employ of Pickands, Mather & Co. He was 53 years of age, a graduate of the University of Illinois. The funeral took place in Quincy. Ill.
EMJ AUGUST 1923 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW
August, 1923  
PACIFIC MINING NEWS OF THE ENGINEERING & MINING JOURNAL-PRESS

Personals

Ira B. Joralemon has returned to San Francisco.
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W. D. O’Brien, of Santiago, Chile, is in San Francisco.
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Arthur J. Crowley, of Sulphur, Nev., was in San Francisco last month.
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F. Bowerman, of Johannesburg, S. Africa, is in San Francisco, and expects to return home, within the next month.
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E. P. Crawford is in San Francisco, after a year spent in Western Chihuahua. He expects to return to Mexico shortly.
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W. R. Wilson, President and General Manager of the Crow’s Nest Pass Coal Co., visited Vancouver and Victoria, B. C., in July.
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Frank Daniels, of Pasadena, Calif., passed through San Francisco recently, on his return from a three weeks’ vacation in Northern California.
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Andrew G. Larsen, mining engineer of Spokane, Wash., has returned from Stewart, B. C., after inspecting some properties in that district.
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Rudolph Gahl, consulting metallurgist, has moved his office, from 804 Equitable Building, Denver, Col., to 1101 Laurel St., Berkeley, Calif.
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R. C. Riblet, of the Riblet Tramway Co., Spokane, Wash., is in Peru, superintending the erection of a new tramway line for the American Smelting & Refining Co., from Singirual to Milluachaqui.
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Dr. Charles Camsell, Deputy Minister of Mines of Canada, is inspecting mining conditions in British Columbia. His department, he states, is desirous of seeing prospectors direct special attention to mineralized districts adjacent to railways.
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Samuel L. Silverman, of New York, heads a party that left recently for the Portland Canal district, B. C. Among those with him are Malcolm Stobie, of Stobie & Furlong, Toronto, Ont.; R. B. Lamb, mining engineer of New York, advising Mr. Stobie; W. D. Wilson, of Hamilton, Ont.; and F. H. Phippen, of Toronto, Ont. Mr. Silverman is interested in the development of the Forty-Nine, and Bush properties, situated in the same section as the Premier mine, and he, and his confreres, intend inspecting these, and other mining prospects.
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Leopold Albu, Managing Director of the General Mining & Finance Corporation, of London, Eng., passed through Vancouver, B. C., recently, en route to Northern British Columbia and Alaskan mining fields. After inspecting mining properties, he will return East, via California. Mr. Albu said that Canada has all the advantages of South Africa, plus ample water and profuse vegetation.
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The engineering practice previously conducted under the firm name of Dahl & Wartenweiler, Los Angeles, has, since May 1, been taken over by S. K. Dahl, who will continue the business of designs and construction of mine-surface plants, and industrial plants, with offices in the Central Building, Los Angeles.  Mr. Otto Wartenweiler, in withdrawing from the firm of Dahl & Wartenweiler, has accepted an appointment as engineer with the Hammond Lumber Co.
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Olaf P. Jenkins, Associate Professor of Economic Geology, State College of Washington, is making a geological examination of the coals of Skagit County, Washington, for the Division of Geology, Department of Conservation and Development. This is a continuation of the work he did in Whatcom County, last summer, the report of which is now in the hands of the State Printer.
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F. A. Leach, Jr., has been appointed Vice-president arid General Manager of the Pacific Gas & Electric Co., to succeed John A. Britton, who died recently. Mr. Leach entered the public-utility service 25 years ago, in the employ of the Oakland Gas Light and Heat Co., of which John A. Britton was President and Manager. Upon Mr. Britton’s acceptance of the presidency of the California Gas and Electric Corporation, of which the Oakland Gas Light and Heat Co. was a subsidiary, Mr. Leach was appointed to succeed him as manager of that company, and also the Berkeley Electric Lighting Co.

Then, upon the organization of the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. in 1905, Mr. Leach became manager of what is now called the East Bay division of the combine. Three years ago, he was called to the head office in San Francisco, as Vice-president In- Charge of Public Relations and Service, and in that capacity, has had charge of the operation of the company’s territorial divisions and districts, throughout the entire system.
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General R. G. E. Leckie, a mining engineer of prominence in Western Canada, died recently in Vancouver. In recent times, he had been engaged in putting the Windpass mine, at Chu Chua, upon a producing basis. Through his efforts, Trite, Wood and Wilson, of Fernie, B. C., have been assisting in the financing of the Windpass property.
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UNDERGROUND MINING SCENE
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PHILLY GEAR WORKS
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1921 DUPLEX 4X4 TRUCK AT WORK
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MINING AT THE FACE (END OF THE TUNNEL)
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1921 VULCAN LOCOMOTIVE
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1922 UNDERGROUND MINING
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NEW SOUTH WALES PROSPECTOR
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EMJ MAY 1923 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW
May, 1923   PACIFIC MINING NEWS OF THE ENGINEERING & MINING JOURNAL-PRESS
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Personals

Marc L. Latham is at Trona, Calif.
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William Motherwell is at Los Angeles, Calif.
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T. F. Stipp, Assistant Resident Geologist of the Kern Division, Associated Oil Co., has been transferred to Fellows, Calif., to similar duties there.
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E. P. Mathewson has accepted an appointment as consulting engineer, on the staff of the Granby Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of British Columbia.
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Chester B. Allen, of Minerals Separation North American Corporation, was in Spokane recently, on his way to the Coeur d’Alenes, on business connected with company affairs.
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Dr. George Hanson, of the Canadian Geological Survey, recently addressed the Vancouver Island Prospectors’ Association, on the geology of the Salmon River district, Portland Canal.
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Roy H. Elliott, recently Assistant Manager of the Metals Exploration Co., has opened an office as consulting mining engineer, at room 1200, in the First National Bank Building, San Francisco, Calif.
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Stephen Birch, President of the Kennecott Copper Corporation, recently donated $2,000 to the Alaska Agricultural College, and School of Mines, at Fairbanks, Alaska, to be used in building up a reference library.
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O. E. Coombs and H. S. Little, of San Francisco, dredge men for the Hammond interests, recently arrived in Fairbanks, Alaska, en route to Nome, to prepare for next season’s operations. They have a dog team waiting at Nenana, and will mush down the Yukon, to St. Michaels, then cross Norton Sound, to Nome.
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R. H. Kergin, the representative in the British Columbia Legislature, Portland Canal, and Atlin sections, has returned to Victoria, after touring the cities of eastern Canada, and the United States. He said “the Premier mine is much more talked about in the East than it is here, and there is a great deal of American capital being sent into the country. We are on the eve of a real boom in mining, although the people of British Columbia apparently do not recognize this.”
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At the annual meeting of the Independent Oil Producers Agency, at Bakersfield, Calif., on April 11, 1923, L. P. St. Clair was re-elected President for the ensuing year.

The following were elected to the Executive Committee: I. W. Fuqua of Los Angeles; W. H. Hill and G. R. Garrison of San Diego; W. W. Colm and P. H. Welsh of Fresno; W. L. Stewart of Los Angeles; E. E. Bailey of Pasadena; L. P. Guiberson of Taft; D. S. Ewing of San Francisco; H. D. Colson of Taft; Z. L. Phelps of Coalinga; Chester H. Warlow of Fresno.
**
The Board of Directors for the year includes: E. E. Baily, E. W. Baily, C. A. Barlow, F. C. Berry, C. J. Berry, George A. Betts, L. C. Bowles, E. W. Clark, W. W. Colm, H. D. Colson, Martin Coyne, T. J. Crumpton, T. B. Doub, D. S. Ewing, I. W. Fuqua, J. Goldman, D. J. Gonyer, R. E. Graham, L. P. Guiberson, G. R. Harrison, W. H. Hill, H. A. Jastro, H. T. Johnson, W. T. Knowles, C. A. Landgron, H. Layer, C. W. Goddard, J. L. McGinn, F. R. McQuigg, Alex Miller, S. W. Morsehead, T. A. O’Donnell, M. C. Parker, H. R. Peacock, G. R. Peckham, Z. L. Phelps, C. E. Price, G. A. Scott, W. B. Robb, L. P. St. Clair, W. L. Stewart,, A. M. Strong, H. W. Thomas, T. R. Thompson, W. R. Wardner, C. H. Warlow, A E. Weil, H. H. Welsh, M. H. Whittier, T. M. Young.
**
S. W. Morsehead and L. P. St. Clair were chosen to act on the Arbitration Committee.
**
George W. Lane was re-elected attorney for the year.
**
Personals

Among those who attended the inaugural meeting of the Mining Division of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce were: P. T. Albert, Sacramento, Calif.; Isabella C. Alberta, Oakland, Calif.; Mark N. Ailing, Angels Camp, Calif.; H. C. Anchor, South Porcupine, Ontario, Canada; Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, Humboldt County, Nev.; Stanley Arnot, Plymouth, Calif.; A. T. Arthur, Tonopah, Nev.; H. J. Barton, Yreka, Calif.; J. Biggs, Sacramento, Calif.; Robert H. Bedford, Grass Valley, Calif.; Sam Beer, Greenwood, Calif.;

Win. J. Belcher, Marysville, Calif.; Robert J. Burgess, Oroville, Calif.; Drury Butler, Sacramento, Calif.; D. Bryce, Battle Mountain, Nev.; J. O. Carlisle, Downieville, Calif.; A. L. Chappell, Stockton, Calif.; J. Whitfield Clarke, Johnsville, Calif.; Oscar L. Coflin, Grass Valley, Calif.; Jos. T. Collins, San Francisco; J. L. Corbett, Hilt, Calif.; F. C. Crosby, Lincoln, Calif.; Win. Daley, Sacramento, Calif.;

Frank M. Darrow, Jackson, Calif.; W. E. Darrow, Jackson, Calif.; Chas. C. Dowd, Tuolumne, Calif.; L. H. Duschak, San Francisco; Chauncey H. Dunn, Sacramento, Calif.; Eganswood J. Sharp, Searchlight, Nev.; Geo. W. Elliott, Sacramento, Calif.; H. L. Englebright, Nevada City, Calif.; Alexander Egans, Reno, Nev.; W. L. Erwin, Sacramento, Calif.; B. W. D. Evans, San Francisco; W. E. Everson, Elk Grove, Calif.; Arthur B. Feote, Grass Valley, Calif.;

Will J. French, San Francisco; J. A. Fulton, Grass Valley, Calif.; S. E. Gamble, San Francisco; V. S. Garbarini, Jackson, Calif.; S. G. Gearhart, Stockton, Calif.; A. A. Gibson, San Francisco; J. L. Gluyas, Sacramento, Calif.; Edson O. Grant, Sacramento, Calif.; Major U. S. Grant, San Francisco; F. E. Haley, San Francisco; Fletcher Hamilton, San Francisco; James I. Herz, San Francisco; Edwin Higgins, San Francisco;

James M. Hill, San Francisco; H. R. Weathers, San Francisco; E. S. Howard, Sacramento, Calif.; A. S. Howe, Sutter Creek, Calif.; Robert H. Howson, Sacramento, Calif.; B. Irwin Hoxie, Amador City, Calif.; Leon Johnson, Sacramento, Calif.; Robert I. Kerr, San Francisco; W. S. Kingsbury, Sacramento, Calif.; J. Kruttschnitt, Jr., Tucson, Ariz.; Henry A. Kunz, Angels Camp, Calif.; C. A. Logan, Auburn, Calif.; Fred McCall, Sacramento, Calif.; Geo. McAulay, Forrest Hill, Calif.; Ralph McGee, Jackson, Calif.;

C. O. McMorry, Sacramento, Calif.; J. A. McDavitt, Sacramento, Calif.; D. E. McPherson, Jamestown, Calif.; Henry A. Myers, Plymouth, Calif.; M. H. Miller, Downieville, Calif.; J. A. Montreeville, Angels Camp, Calif.; F. H. Morey, Placerville, Calif.; Albert F. Morrison, Los Angeles, Calif.; Mitchel W. Nathan, Sacramento, Calif.; George Nickerson, Sacramento, Calif.; C. F. Prentiss, Sacramento, Calif.; John H. Ragon, Nevada City, Calif.;

Fred. L. Rheinschomiller, Sacramento, Calif.; Frederick C. Rodgers, New York; Lloyd L. Root, San Francisco; Alex. F. Ross, Jackson, Calif.; A. J. Ross, San Francisco; G.  McM. Ross, Stockton, Calif.; Philip F. A. Ryan, Sacramento, Calif.; A. R. Sedlacke, Decatur, Ill.; Mrs. E. R. Skemp, Sacramento, Calif.; T. D. M. Slaven, Sacramento, Calif.; Almon. E. Smith, Magalia, Calif.; Webb Smith, Sacramento, Calif.; Watterson J. Simpson, Chicago, Ill.;

Wilbur Field Smith, Sacramento, Calif.; James Spiers, Jackson, Calif.; K. Steindorff, San Francisco; A. D. Stevenot, Melones, Calif.; F. D. Stevenot, Carson Hill, Calif.; M. L. Summers, Hammonton, Calif.; Harry B. Seymour, Sacramento, Calif.; J. J. Sutton, San Francisco; K. R. Sharron, Virginia City, Nev.; William H. Sweet, Pershing County, Nev.; H. Shear, Sacramento, Calif.; A. Terrault, Placerville, Calif.; Yanco Terzich, Sacramento, Calif.; C. Tilton, Sacramento, Calif.; E. H. Traxler, Sacramento, Calif.;

P. C. Van Fleet, Humboldt, Nev.; Jas. W. Ward, San Francisco; Corey T. Wells, Sacramento, Calif.; Walter R. Woock, Cathay, Calif.; George J. Young, San Francisco; P. T. Youston, Nome, Alaska; F. W. Ye Testa, Huizochic, Mexico.
***
The Western Division of the American Mining Congress will meet in San Francisco on June 11, 1923.
May, 1923
EMJ 08261922 MINING MEN BIOS
382 Engineering and Mining Journal-Press Vol. 114, No. 9  AUGUST 26, 1922

MEN You SHOULD KNOW ABOUT  

W. W. Mein has recently been in Utah.
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Ernest N. Patty left Seattle, Wash., on Aug. 9, for Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Edwin Higgins, F. G. Farish, and F. H. Dakin are at the Fremont mine, near Sutter Creek, Cal.
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E. A. Julian, general manager for the Goldfield Consolidated Mining Co., is in Reno, from San Francisco.
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Charles L. Denison, president of the Teck Hughes, has visited the property in Kirkland Lake, Ontario.
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Rol. King is in Los Angeles. His address for the present is 304 Wilcox Building.
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D. F. Hewett is acting as Chief of the section of metalliferous deposits of the U. S. Geological Survey.
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A. G. Hall, until recently the manager of the properties of Burma Mines, Ltd., in India, is in San Francisco.
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Pentecost Mitchell, of Duluth, Minn., vice-president of the Oliver Iron Mining Co., has returned from a trip abroad.
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Roy Young, of Spokane, was in Stewart, B. C., in July and has left for Eagle, on the Yukon River, in Alaska.
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L. F. S. Holland has been making an examination in Lincoln County, N. M., and returned to Hollywood, Cal., on Aug. 24.
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S. A. Spellmeyer, chief engineer for the San Luis Mining Co., in Durango, Mexico, expects to pass the next few months in California.
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Edward Sampson and J. L. Gilson, of the U. S. Geological Survey, are making geological observations at the south end of Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.
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Edmund Juessen, mining engineer, with headquarters in San Francisco, has been doing professional work on the Comstock Lode, Nevada.
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H. L. Harland, mill superintendent for the Robinson Gold Mining Co., Ltd., South Africa, for many years, is visiting relatives at Juneau, Alaska.
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M. P. McDonald, mining engineer of Toronto, inspected the Spokane Mining & Development Co’s. copper property, near Beasly, B. C., early in August.
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Dorsey A. Lyon, chief metallurgist of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, after several months spent at Western stations of the Bureau, has returned to Washington.
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T. P. O’Hara, who has served for many years as an assistant to the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey, has resigned to undertake the practice of law.
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James F. McCarthy, of Wallace, Idaho, president and manager of the Hecla Mining Co., is in Milwaukee, where he attended a meeting of Hecla directors held on Aug. 19.
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Sydney W. Ford, of the Rimer Gold Dredging Co., New Zealand, has been investigating gold-dredging operations in California, and left San Francisco for New Zealand on Aug. 15.
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J. Nelson Nevius, of Pasadena, Cal., has accepted appointment as valuation mining engineer with the Income Tax Unit, Bureau of Internal Revenue, and is now in Washington.
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Louis D. Huntoon has gone to Schumacher, Ontario, to examine the recent developments in the McIntyre mine. He examined this property last January and again in March.
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George S. Rice, chief mining engineer of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, is making a tour of the Western mining states, and will also visit British Columbia before his return to Washington.
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Fred Morris, of San Francisco, was recently in Juneau, Alaska, en route to San Francisco from the Atlin district in northern British Columbia. Mr. Morris examined a silver-lead deposit.
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Harry E. Meyer, chief clerk of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, is visiting the experiment stations with the idea of improving office management and standardizing office clerical procedure.
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Maurice D. Leehey, mining man and attorney of Seattle, returned to his home on Aug. 16, after a hurried trip to Fairbanks, Iowa, where he had been called by the sudden death of his mother.
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E. F. Campbell, late superintendent of United Verde Extension Mining Co. at Jerome, Ariz, is organizing an exploration company on the Pacific Coast, and is changing his home address to San Diego.
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T. H. Aldrich, mining engineer and mineralogist of Birmingham, Ala., has just returned from a three weeks’ investigation, for the owners, of the Emma mine, of the Buffalo Sulphur Refining Co., at Telluride, Col.
=[-=-=-=-=
Robert K. Painter, James D. Stewart and Arthur V. Schenck have formed a partnership under the firm name of Painter, Stewart & Schenck, for the practice of mining, civil and hydroelectric engineering at Auburn, Cal.
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Walter B. Lang has been appointed geologic aid to take the place of H. W. Hoots in the work on Texas potash. Mr. Lang will be in the chemical laboratory of the Survey for a short time prior to taking up the work in Texas.
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C. E. Augustine, a fuel engineer of the Bureau of Mines staff, at the request of the Veteran’s Bureau will visit all hospitals, making recommendations as to the improvements that may be made in fuel-burning equipment and in the selection of fuel.
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G. R. Hanks, superintendent of the High Bridge plant of the Taylor-Wharton Iron & Steel Co., is visiting the gold-dredging fields in California for the purpose of determining the conditions under which alloy steel is used in the dredging industry.
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Philip Wiseman, of Los Angeles, spent part of the month of August at Spokane and in the Coeur d’Alenes. While in the latter district he spent much of his time on the property under development by the Coeur d’Alene Syndicate, in which he is interested.
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William C. Noxon, Agent-General for Ontario in England, recently addressed the mining club of London on the mining industries of Ontario, in connection with an exhibit of samples of the gold and silver ores of that province. These were examined by a large number of engineers and metallurgists.
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An exploring party including Prof. W. G. Worcester, provincial engineer of Saskatchewan; Prof. C. J. Mackenzie, of Saskatchewan University; and W. G. Hastings, of the provincial Bureau of Labor, have gone to Red Deer Lake to investigate the original source of coal deposits on the banks of the Red River.
=--=-=-=-=-=
J. Niles, of Sheffield, England, and O. Wehrheim, of The Hague, Holland, European representatives of FreynBassert Steel Co., Chicago, were recent visitors on the iron ranges in Minnesota. They have been inspecting mines and concentrators prior to their departure for The Hague, where they will superintend the erection of a furnace.
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Mining and metallurgical engineers visiting New York City last week included: Alfred C. Langdon, of Globe, Ariz.; W. Spencer Hutchinson, of Boston, Mass.; S. D. Bridge, of Monterey, Mexico; David Tamor, of Cuba; Guy Courtney, of Melbourne, Australia; and H. J. Morgan, of Cleveland, Ohio.
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SOCIETY MEETINGS ANNOUNCED

The Nevada Section of the A.LM.E., will meet at Gold Hill on Sept. 20, the day set for the starting of the 2,500-ton plant of the United Comstock Mines Co.
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American Electrochemical Society will hold its forty-second general meeting at Montreal, Quebec, Sept. 21 to 23, at the Hotel Windsor.
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OBITUARY

Gardner F. Williams died in San Francisco on Aug. 22. An appreciation of the man and his work will appear in an early issue.
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Hans S. Meyer died of appendicitis at Johannesburg, South Africa, on Aug. 4. Mr. Meyer was forty-five years old. He came to the Rand in 1897, and had been with the Rand Mines up to his death. Mr. Meyer was a past president of the Chemical and Metallurgical Society of South Africa.
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356 Engineering and Mining Journal-Press Vol. 114, No. 9

AUGUST 26 1922

A SHORT HISTORY OF ARTHUR WATTS ALLEN



A TINY ISLAND in the Western Pacific afforded Arthur Watts Allen his first opportunity for purely scientific research. Born in England in 1879, when seventeen, Allen had won a scholarship tenable at Cambridge University. He was graduated in 1902 with the B. A. degree. Allen had elected to take a general science course, and after graduation joined a relative, H. A. (now Sir Henry) Wickham, in New Guinea.

Wickham held a grant of an atoll of islands from the British government, on condition that development and research be conducted on the artificial propagation of sponge and pearl shell. This biological research was done by Allen, who reported to the government, and also contributed a paper on another phase of marine zoology to the Transactions of the Linnean Society, of London.

After interesting experiences in New Guinea and the islands, Allen went to Western Australia, where he joined his eldest brother, Robert, in a journey to the Australian Northwest. He assisted in the construction of a tailing retreatment plant, taking charge as soon as this was in operation. At the conclusion of this work Allen went to the Westralia Mount Morgans mine as assayer, becoming metallurgist after a few months.

In 1907, he left Australia, went to Mexico, and took charge of the sixty-stamp mill and cyanide plant of the Palmarejo & Mexican Goldfields, in Chihuahua. Here he devised a new method of operating a stationary-leaf vacuum filter; this he patented, a description being published in Engineering and Mining Journal of May 15, 1909.  

Allen followed into professional work with the Rio Plata company at Guazapares, after which he was asked by an English company to report on mill and power-plant requirements for the cyanidation of a silver ore at San Julian, near Guadalupe y Calvo. This led to an engagement as constructional metallurgical engineer.

He was metallurgist to the Uruguay Consolidated Mines Co. and consulting metallurgist to the Uruguay Goldfields Co., Uruguay, South America, in 1910-1911. He went to Africa in 1912, for Lewis & Marks, and became reduction-works manager at the Lonely Reef mine, in Rhodesia.

In 1914, he compiled “Mill and Cyanide Handbook,” and began preparing a third edition of Julian & Smart’s “Cyaniding Gold and Silver Ores,” recently published.

At the outbreak of the Great War he volunteered for active service, but the offer was declined by the British War Office. Allen then went to Argentina as general manager of some silver mines. He left Argentina in 1916, and made an inspection of methods of recovering nitrate in Chile, with special reference to the handling of the slime in the caliche.

He came to the United States in 1917, and in that year and 1918, carried out consulting work in New York, in the latter year joining the staff of Engineering and Mining Journal as Metallurgical Editor, and filing “first papers” for American citizenship.

In 1919, an opportunity arose to interest a New York syndicate in a new process for treating Chilean caliche which had been evolved by Allen since his visit to Chile in 1916, and in 1920, he accepted an appointment as engineer to the Penyon Syndicate, which had obtained an option on an immense deposit of nitrate grounds in Chile, and had erected a pilot mill to demonstrate the feasibility of an exceedingly complicated process. After exhaustive trials this process was abandoned. . At the conclusion of experimentation Allen was able to make a few tests to demonstrate his own process, and with promising results.

Early in 1920 he was asked by the Du Pont Nitrate company to submit a report on the subject of the treatment of caliche, with particular reference to his process, and as a result was engaged to go to Chile to demonstrate his method on a commercial scale.

The Du Pont oficina (headquarters) at Tal Tal is now converted to operate entirely by the new process. Allen wrote an account of the Shanks as well as his own process, which was published as “Recovery of Nitrate from Chilean Caliche,” by Charles Griffin & Co., of London. He joined Mining and Scientific Press early in 1921 as Associate Editor. He has published, in addition to “Handbook of Ore Dressing,” many contributions to the technical press and to society Transactions.

Allen’s recent writing discloses a ripening of his earlier conclusions as to the great service to industry and to humanity of purely scientific research. In a widely copied paper he holds that: “Science needs and deserves encouragement, sympathy, and facilities. It must be allowed to work in freedom and without restraint.  The provision of funds is not all that is necessary; for discovery is not an open book, to be read by the passer-by. It must be approached by men of keen analytical and dissective minds, men with experience, knowledge, perception, logic, and a capacity for unlimited perseverance. Three essentials are needed: the best men that can be found, ample resources, and patience as to results.” The quotation, in its statement of the requisite characteristics of the research engineer, bodies forth the man himself.

Mr. Allen is now Associate Editor of the Pacific Mming News and Assistant Editor, Engineering and Mining Journal -Press. He is a member of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, and the Society of Chemical Industry. He lives, with his family in Berkeley, Cal.
M&E WORLD 12 23 1916 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW
1080 MINING AND ENGINEERING WORLD December 23, 1916.

PERSONAL.

J. Ralph Scott, of Hardington, Ont., is visiting at Calumet, Mich.
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Joseph MacDonald, of Guanajuato, Mexico, is in Los Angeles, Calif.
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G. A. Gibbon, mining engineer, has returned to the United States, from Peru.
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H. W. Fesing, of Houghton, Mich., has gone to Los Angeles, Calif., on professional business.
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T. W. Mather, Guayaquil, Ecuador, has left that city permanently, and is now in Pacific Grove, Calif.
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D. Thomas has accepted the position of general manager of the Davidson mines, at South Porcupine, Ont.
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J. F. Cowan, general manager of the Tucson-Arizona Copper Co., Tucson, Ariz., is in Salt Lake City, Utah.
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D. MacGavin, of the Canadian Mining Corporation, Toronto, Ont., is spending the holidays in San Francisco, Calif.
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H. D. Richardson, superintendent of the Boise-Rochester Co., Atlanta, Idaho, has resigned and left for Los Angeles, Calif.
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M. C. H. Little, mining engineer, is leaving Canada, to become an officer of the English tunneling engineering force in France.
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E. Gybbon Spilsbury, consulting mining and metallurgical engineer, New York, has returned from a professional trip to Cuba.
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C. F. Sturtevant, Salt Lake City, Utah, has left for Jerome, Ariz., where he will take charge of the Jerome-Pacific mines.
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James MacNaughton, general manager of the Calumet & Hecla Co., Houghton, Mich., has recently made Boston, Mass., his headquarters.
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C. Chynoweth, mining engineer, New York, and secretary of the Wolverine & Arizona Co., Bisbee, Ariz., has been inspecting the company’s property.
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Newton W. Emmens, mining engineer, Vancouver, B. C., is in the Coeur d’Alene district, Idaho, in the interest of the Kulsa smelter, British Columbia.
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C. L. Parsons, U. S. Bureau of Mines, is returning to this country from Europe, where he has been studying methods of manufacturing nitrogen.
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Frank M. Leland, consulting engineer for the Empire Copper Co., Mackay, Idaho, has resigned, and F. L. Vahrenkamp has been appointed to fill the vacancy.
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Henry F. Collins has been made consulting engineer of the Huelva Copper & Sulphur Mines, Ltd., Cueva de la Mora, Valdelamusa, Spain. He was formerly general manager of the company.
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H. J. Wallace, field engineer for the Anaconda Copper Co., at Great Falls, Mont., has been made superintendent of construction, which position was made vacant by the recent resignation of F. J. Brule.
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H. M. Wolflin has been designated by the U. S. Bureau of Mines, to succeed Edwin Higgins, in charge of the California co-operative work of the Bureau, and the Industrial Accident Commission.

Mr. Wolflin had charge of this work from January, 1914, to January, 1916, during which time he made a preliminary survey of mine-safety conditions in the state, and assisted in drafting the mine safety rules.

When Mr. Higgins’ resignation as chief mine inspector became effective, Mr. Wolflin made a request of the Bureau of Mines that he again be assigned to take charge of the work. The Industrial Accident Commission has appointed Mr. Wolflin chief mine inspector.
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A. D. Cox has resigned as superintendent of the Union Hill mine, Grass Valley, Calif., to enter the employ of G. S. Johnson & Co.  The vacancy will be filled by E. MacBoyle, formerly general manager of the company operating the mine.
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C. F. Van Barneveld, formerly at the head of the Mines Department at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco, has accepted a position as supervising engineer and metallurgist, for the U. S. Bureau of Mines, at Tuscon, Ariz.
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OBITUARY.

Joseph Carson, superintendent of the Gold Hunter Mining & Milling Co., Mullan, Idaho, died at that place, on Dec. 10.
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Jesse W. Davis, a pioneer prospector of the southwest, passed away in Silver City, N. M. on Dec. 6, from pneumonia. In the early prospecting days, he was closely associated with James S. Douglas, in the country around Prescott, Ariz.
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Oscar C. Steele, at one time operator of the Burning Moscow, Andes, West Con., Virginia, and other mines on the Comstock, passed away on Dec. 10, at Virginia City, Nev. He was born in Ohio in 1838, and migrated to this country in 1859, and later became interested in various mining enterprises of this district.
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SCHOOLS AND SOCLETIES.

American Institute of Mining Engineers—The Utah section of. the Institute held a postponed meeting at the Hotel Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, on Dec. 16. Officers were elected, after which an interesting paper was read by J. M. Callow, ‘Notes on Flotation in 1916,” and a second by Erwin Wilke, “Manufacture and Use of Sulphuric Acid.”
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American Institute of Mining Engineers- The Chicago section met on Dec. 22, at the Chicago Engineers’ Club.

After dinner, Alonzo G. Kinyon of the Powdered Coal Engineering & Equipment Co. read a paper on “Burning Powdered Coal” in which the application of this class of fuel in the reverberatories at Anaconda was discussed.

H. B. Pulsifer, Armour Institute, addressed the meeting on the “Metallurgical Plants
About Chicago: The Greatest Metallurgical Center on Earth.”
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University of Utah—For miners and prospectors, a course of 4 weeks in length, beginning Jan. 8, will be given. It will comprise 36 lectures, and 20 laboratory periods.

Prof. F. J. Pack and Prof. Schneider will have charge of the geology and mineralogy; Prof. Lewis of mining and milling, and Prof. Bradford of metallurgy. A nominal registry fee of $1 only is required.

In addition, Prof. Bradford will conduct a course in industrial science. Lectures will be given on the mining, milling and smelting methods in general, as practiced around Utah, and neighboring states.
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University of Illinois—The senior mining engineering students, under the direction of Professors H. H. Stock and F. A. Holbrook, have completed their annual inspection trip. This year the trip included an inspection of the State Mine Rescue Station at Springfield, Ill., the lead smelter at Collinsville, Ill., and the Laclede byproduct coking plant at St. Louis, Mo.

From here the party established headquarters in Flat River, Mo., and spent several days visiting the lead mines and mills in the district. A side trip was made to the old Mine La Matte, which is being rejuvenated by modern methods. Afterwards several of the large coal mines in southern Illinois were inspected.
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EMJ 01 13 1917 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW
124  EMJ JANUARY 13 1917  MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW  
     
ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL    Vol. 103, No. 2

Percival Johnson has been made Director of the Pulaski Iron Co.
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C. M. Weld announces the removal of his office, to No. 2 Rector St., New York.
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Marshall O. Ortoer has removed his office to 213 Boston Building, Denver. Col.
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R. B. Marchant, Treasurer of J. G. White & Co., New York, was recently elected Vice-president of the company.
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J. B. Moore has accepted a position as Mine Manager, for the Tigre Mining Co,. at Esqueda, Sonora, Mexico.
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H. M. Beattie—We have received an inquiry for the address of Mr. Beattie, who was in Chicago, in 1912.
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Dyke V. Keedy has gone to South America on professional business.  He expects to be absent about three months.
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Heath Steele has been elected President of the Mining and Development Co., with head offices at 60 Broadway. New York.
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E. S. Christiansen has been appointed Manager of the Detroit office, of the United Smelting and Aluminum Co., of New Haven. Conn.
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Persifor G. Spilsbury left New York, on Dec. 28, for an Inspection trip to the Joplin and Oklahoma zinc fields, and then to Arizona.
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F. B. Tough has resigned his position with the Kern Trading and Oil Co., in order to enter the Petroleum Division, of the U. S. Bureau of Mines.
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K. C. Li. president of the Hunan Government Lead Smelting Works, was recently in San Francisco to purchase machinery and supplies.
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Mark R. Lamb, for several years, Manager for Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. In South America, has resigned from the service of the company, and will return to the United States.
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R. N. Lyman has resigned as Mine Manager, for the Seneca-Superior Silver Mines, to become President, and Managing Director, of the Elliott-Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd., with offices at Cobalt. Ont.
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James MacNaughton, First Vice-president, and General Manager of the Calumet & Hecla, and subsidiaries, is at Houghton, Mich., from Boston and expects to remain a month or six weeks.
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James Lord has retired as President of the American Iron and Steel Manufacturing Co., of Lebanon. Penn., after 41 years of continuous activity In the iron and steel manufacturing business.
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Charles W. Henderson, the statistician in charge of the Denver office of the Geological Survey, is in Washington, conferring with H. D. McCaskey, the head of the Mineral Resources division, of the Survey.
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N. O. Lawton, manager for the Vermont Copper Co., South Strafford. Vt., left on Jan. 2, for a trip through the West, on professional business. He will visit prominent mines and mills, returning to Vermont about Feb. 1.
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Francis Church Lincoln, Director of the Mackay School of Mines, Reno. Nev., is at present, examining a copper mine in Ontario, Canada, and will return to Reno, about Jan. 8. 1917, to take up the work at the School of Mines.
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Captain E. N. Cory has been promoted to the position of Assistant Superintendent of the mines, of the Jones & Laughlin Ore Co., in the Michigan field. He was formerly in charge of the Rolling Mill mine, of the company, in Negaunee.
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John A. Davis, Superintendent of the Fairbanks, Alaska, Experiment Station, of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, is selecting his equipment in New York and Boston. before Leaving for Alaska, Mr. Davis will visit several of the stations of the Bureau of Mines.
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Frederick G. Clapp, petroleum engineer and geologist, addressed the Geological Society of America, at Albany, N. Y., on Dec. 28, 1916, on “Ethics of the Petroleum Geologist,” and “Revision of the Structural Classification of Petroleum and Natural Gas Fields.”
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George C. Hicks. Jr., Vice-president, and engineer for the P. H. & F. M. Roots Co., of Connersville, Ind., for the past 11 years, announces his retirement from the company, on Jan. 1, 1917.  Mr. Hicks will act as consulting engineer for the company for a short time.  Before taking up work again at some other company, he expects to take a six months’ vacation.
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Obituary -

Lieut. Gerald Galt, a mining engineer, son of Judge Galt, of Winnipeg, who was serving overseas with the Canadian Engineers, was instantly killed on Christmas night, by a shell. He was 29 years of age, and a graduate of the Toronto School of Practical Science. Previous to his enlistment, he was engaged in a large copper mine at Rancagua, Chile.
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Capt. John Trethewey, a retired mining engineer, died in Toronto on Christmas Day,  after a long illness, at the age of 77. He had during his active life, been identified with a number of mining enterprises, and for several years, was connected with the Silver Islet mine in the Lake Superior region. He was formerly a resident of Owen Sound, but came to Toronto, about ten years ago. He leaves a widow, three daughters, and two sons.
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George L. Wright, a pioneer mining man of Ouray County, died on Dec. 22, 1916. after a brief Illness brought on by an acute attack of kidney trouble. Mr. Wright made several large fortunes in mining, being among the first promoters of the big Sneffels mines, about 36 years ago. He still controlled many big properties in that district.

Among them are the U. S. claims, which are traversed by the new Camp Bird tunnel, and which promised to bring him another large fortune. He was 75 years old. and is survived by his widow, who lives In Ouray, and by a brother, who lives in California. His passing marks the last of Ouray’s real old timers.
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William M. Gilliland, Chief mechanicaI engineer for Pickands, Mather & Co. in the Lake  Superior district, died in his office, in Duluth, Dec. 26, 1916.  Death came suddenly from acute indigestion. He came to the Lake Superior district 14 years ago, taking a position as Assistant mechanical engineer for the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. at Ishpeming.

He left that company, to become Chief engineer for the Quincy Mining Co., in the copper district, going from there, to Douglas Ariz., to take charge of the machinery at the smelteries of the Calumet & Arizona Mining Co.

He returned to the Lake Superior district four years ago, to enter the employ of Pickands, Mather & Co. He was 53 years of age, a graduate of the University of Illinois. The funeral took place in Quincy. Ill.
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EMJ 10 20 1920 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW
1008 ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL Vol. 110, No. 21

OCTOBER  20 1920

MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

C. L. Graves, mining operator of Cusihuriachie, Mexico, has been to Chicago for two weeks on business.
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J. T. Pardee has returned to Washington, after making a geologic study of glacial placers in western Montana.
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Eugene Stebinger again is in Washington, after an extended visit to Bolivia, where he did geological work.
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F. C. Calkins has returned to Washington, after several months’ fieldwork in the Cottonwood district of Utah.
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F. Leslie Ransome is on his way to Arizona for several months’ fieldwork in the Oatman, and other districts in that state.
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George C. Martin has completed geologic fieldwork in the mining region on the Kuskokwim, and lower Yukon rivers, Alaska.
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L. M. Prindle has completed a study of the geology of the Bennington and Hoosick quadrangles, for the U. S. Geological Survey.
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William B. Milliken, mining engineer, and graduate of Colorado School of Mines, has an office in Mining Exchange Building, Denver, Col.
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S. H. Cathcart, who spent the field season investigating the mineral deposits of Seward Peninsula, Alaska, has returned to Washington.
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Anna I. Jonas has returned to Washington, after having made a study of the limestone in York County, Pennsylvania, for the U. S. Geological Survey.
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John H. White, field engineer for the American Metal Co., Ltd., of London, and Denver, Col., was in Reno, Nev., for several days the last of October.
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B. B. McCarthy, of New York, an official of the Yukon Gold Co., recently visited the company’s dredge operating on Prichard Creek, near Murray, Idaho.
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C. B. Van Ostrand has returned to Washington, after having taken records of deep temperatures in thirty-four oil wells in Wyoming, California, and Texas fields.
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Ernest N. Patty, of the Washington State Geological Survey, has been investigating some manganese deposits in the Olympic Range of northwestern Washington.
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Wilbur A. Nelson, State Geologist of Tennessee, was in Washington recently in connection with the economic survey, which is being made of the basin of the Tennessee River.
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Ira B. Joralemon, of Bisbee, Ariz., geologist of the Calumet & Arizona Mining Co., passed through El Paso, Tex., recently, from examining mining properties in Mexico.
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Wm. H. Paul, mining engineer of New York City, formerly in Chihuahua, is now in charge of chrome mines in Guatemala, controlled by United Fruit Co. interests. His address is Guatemala City.
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Lapsley W. Hope has resigned his position as superintendent of the Eureka-Holly Mining Co., Nevada, to accept a similar position with the Ocoee Copper Co., at Ducktown, Tenn.
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F. W. Draper, general manager of the Louisiana Consolidated Mining Co., of Nevada, has returned to the mine at Tybo, after spending a month in New York, in consultation with the directors.
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George Clothier, government mining engineer, of Stewart, B. C., has returned from his final tour of the Salmon River section, Portland Canal Mining Division. He is now preparing his annual report.
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CoI. H. H. YuiII, of Bainbridge, Seymour & Co., mining engineers, 645 Salisbury House, London Wall, London, returned to England about Nov. 1, after his trip to examine properties in British Columbia.
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Dr. J. W. Beede, professor of geology in the University of Texas, has returned from the Mackenzie River valley, where he spent the summer prospecting, in the interest of independent oil operators.
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Herbert Hoover and Theodore Hoover will move their San Francisco offices, on Dec. 1, from the Mills Building, to the Balfour Building. Associated with them are Jas. M. Hyde, David McClure, and H. W. Turner.
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F. W. Bradley, of San Francisco, president of the Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining & Concentrating Co., is at Kellogg, Idaho, where he will remain about two weeks, inspecting the mining and smelting operations of the company.
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R. H. Sutton is now general superintendent of a group of mines near Concepción del Oro, Zacatecas, Mexico, for Cia. Minera Nazareño y Catasillas, S. A.  Mr. Sutton was formerly assistant mine superintendent for Cananea Consolidated Copper Co., at Cananea.
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E. H. Hamilton and E. A. Anderson, general manager, and chief engineer, respectively, of the U. S. Smelting, Mining & Refining Co., Midvale, Utah, have been inspecting various processes in use at the Anaconda Copper Mining Co.’s Washoe reduction works at Anaconda, Mont.
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Prof. G. A. Overstrom, who sailed from San Francisco in September, is now at Tul Mi Chung, Suan Concession, Korea, in the interests of the Seoul Mining Co.  Professor Overstrom visited Honolulu and Yokohama on his way to Korea, and is not expected to return before January.
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Archie H. Jones, metallurgical engineer, of Salt Lake City, Utah, is in New York City, on business connected with a large mill, that his company has designed for a New Mexico property. Mr. Jones recently organized the A. H. Jones Co., metallurgical engineers, of Salt Lake City, which has taken over the business of Charles Butters & Co.
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A. B. McCallum, who a short time ago resigned as chairman of the Research Council of Canada, has been appointed to a professional chair at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.

Dr. McLennan, of Toronto University, is named as Dr. McCallum’s successor on the Research Council, which is to be reorganized. His work as a scientific adviser to the British Admiralty during the war, attracted wide attention.
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SOCIETY MEETINGS

The 1920 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers will be held at Engineering Societies Building, 29 West 39th St., New York City, on Dec. 7 to 10. The keynote of the meeting will be Transportation, and the foremost authorities in its various fields, will discuss its problems. Other engineering problems will also receive due attention.
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The Utah Section of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers met on the evening of Tuesday, Nov. 16., in the assembly room of the Commercial Club, Salt Lake City.  

P. A. Jeanne discussed inductive interference problems, and E. G. Holding, manager of the Holding Electrical Co., spoke on “Early Electrical Experience in Utah.” Joseph F. Merrill was chairman of the meeting.
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OBITUARY

Robert H. Remington, a junior engineer on the staff of the U. S. Geological Survey, was drowned on Nov. 8, while trying to cross a river on the island of Maui, of the Hawaii group.
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Captain Charles Kendall, head mining captain for the Quincy Mining Co., dropped dead at his home on Oct. 26. He was born in Cornwall, England, 65 years ago, coming to the United States when a young man, and entering the employ of the Franklin Mining Co. at their Pewabik mine. He went to the Quincy Co. when it purchased the Pewabik property.
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Captain Thomas Keeper, a pioneer mining man of the Michigan copper country, died suddenly, on Oct. 28, in his 79th year. He was born in Cornwall, England, and came to the United States in 1859, when he entered the employ of the Quincy Mining Co. as a miner.

He later took up mine development in Ontonagon County, where he
was associated with the Union mines, Ontonagon Silver mine, Nonesuch Copper Co., White Pine Co., and, from 1899 to 1906, the manager of the Victoria Copper Co. Since 1906, he had spent his time in mine examination, making his headquarters at his home
in Cresco, Iowa.
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EMJ 10 20 1920 ECHOES FROM THE ENGINEERING FRATERNITY
1006 ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL Vol. 110, No. 21
October 10 1920

ECHOES FROM THE FRATERNITY

Mining and Metallurgical Society GoId Medal Awarded to K A. Cappelen Smith.

A. L. Walker and H. F. Guggenheim Discuss Life and Work of Chuquicamata’s Master Metallurgist.  

The award of the Mining and Metallurgical Society gold medal for the year 1920, was made to E. A. Cappelen Smith, for distinguished service in the art of hydrometallurgy, on Wednesday evening, Oct. 10, at a dinner held at the Hotel Commodore in New York, in the presence of over 150 members, guests and their families.

The toast-master was Dr. E. P. Mathewson, and speeches were made by Dr. Arthur L. Walker and Harry F. Guggenheim, and on the presentation of the medal by Waldemar Lindgren, president of the society.

Dr. Walker told of the coming of Mr. Smith to this country from Norway, his native country; his wanderings, following his profession as a metallurgist, to Anaconda and other parts of the West; then finally back to the East Coast; how he built up a reputation as a progressive and courageous metallurgist, which finally led to his being selected to solve the treatment problems of the great Chuquicamata ore body in Chile.  

Dr. Walker’s speech was freely interspersed with witty remarks, and kept the audience in good humor during the not too circumstantial account of Mr. Smith’s professional history.

Harry F. Guggenheim sketched briefly and vividly, the fact that the ore deposit at Chuquicamata had been known for hundreds of years; that it had first been worked by the Incas and, after the conquest, by the Spaniards; that the rich ores had been exhausted, and though the color of the rock proclaimed to every comer “Here is copper,” it awaited the touch of adventurous science, to transform the desert into the abode of industry.

This had been accomplished by the scientific staff of M. Guggenheim’s Sons, and in this the solution of the metallurgical problem by Cappelen Smith, was one of the most important features.

As the result, plants capable of treating 10,000 tons of ore a day, from an ore reserve that would last over a hundred years, have been constructed; 4,000 workers are employed in the enterprise; and a modern mining town had taken the place of the empty waste.  In short, Mr. Guggenheim remarked, a soul had been born in the desert.

Mr. Lindgren, in presenting the medal to Mr. Smith, acknowledged his own unfamiliarity with metallurgy, although he claimed once to have, by superhuman efforts, kept a lead furnace running for three days. “Eventually,” he remarked philosophically, ‘she froze.”

In accepting the honor conferred by the society, Mr. Smith displayed both modesty and humor, pointing out that the achievements at Chuquicamata had been the result of enthusiastic team work on the part of the staff, under the captaincy of Pope Yeatman, and recounting some of his experiences since coming to the United States.

He paid a feeling tribute to the equal opportunity and generous appreciation given foreigners in this country, only provided they would work. He had found it difficult to convince people that he had not changed his name from what it was in Norway; and had noted with amusement the struggles of his friends in this country with the geography of Europe.

He had been dubbed “Swede Smith” in Anaconda, to distinguish him from the rest of the family; and finally, as a concession to his tales about the rugged mountains of his native land, “that Swede from Switzerland.”  

At the speakers’ table, besides the above mentioned, were G. P. Bartholomew and Dr. R. H. Richards.
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[Billy rehab notes- Having lived in Chuquicamata area for a time, at 2 kilometers in altitude, there was some adjustment to living there, in the form of flu-like symptoms, the inability at first to even walk to the curb and back without having to lay down for an hour or two.  

I had arrived there in June, the start of winter in the Southern Hemisphere.  I had been in Santiago, Chile, where I picked up a few fleas, and being transferred 800 miles north to Calama (the main supply town adjacent to Chuquicamata), I was impressed by just how barren the Atacama Desert really was.

No bushes, no trees, no streams or nothing, except the remnants of British concentration camps aka nitrate oficinas, where trapped and isolated Chilean caliche miners had no voice and no rights.  

Those that did make an arduous excursion to Iquique to protest conditions and steep costs of the company store were rounded up in the main plaza in the 1920’s, and promptly massacred together with their families (about 380 victims).  

A big dry lake (playa) on the outskirts of Antofagasta was almost entirely composed of yellow and red sulfur, and though Antofagasta was a sea port (with British architectural influence throughout), it almost never rained there.  

Iquique had no record of it ever having rained there, and the day that I arrived in Calama/Chuquicamata, there was a light rain- the first one in five years.  So arid and high in altitude was that place that in less than three days, NO MORE FLEAS.  

The most notable feature around was the remnants of old beach lines and water marks when that portion of Chile was oceanfront property; now 3 ½ hours (at 60 mph) removed from the shoreline.  However, there was a little stream that flowed from off the Andes mountains into the edge of town.  

For the most part, in that portion of Chile, the water is not potable, and cannot be used from the tap.  The custom is for the mine to fill large water tanks that sit on a big mine truck tire throughout Calama, and with wine jugs or other containers, to fill those for home use.  

Water out of the tap, while suitable for bathing, tends to be an adobe color full of minerals that stain bath fixtures and eat away faucets, yet there are over 100,000 people that lived and worked there.

Many Chileans and native people in that part have short statures; say 1 meter 50 cm.  Doors and entryways are built accordingly.  However, enough short people can accomplish a lot, and drive really big trucks in a really big hole.  Though Chuquicamata was the going gig at the time, there are 3 really big holes in the area now (Google it).  In the 1970's, the mine was about 8 miles long, 5 miles wide, and about a mile deep.

Besides copper, just about every other metal was found in its ore, and besides a primary reduction (for copper), multiple other processes were used to get the gold, silver, lithium, uranium, etc., out as well.  From the mine were pulled 1000 lb., to multi-ton sheets of native copper.

Just like most everywhere else in Chile, temblors and shakes were the norm of daily life; probably the one thing or sensation that I miss most.  Not the loss of life or property, but the action that reminded me almost daily just how puny the arm of a man is, compared to God and the dynamics of the Planet Earth.]
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American Engineering Council Representatives Named by A. I. M. E.
F. A. E. S. Membership Increasing But A. S. C. E. Decides To Stay Out

At a meeting of the executive committee of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers on Oct. 28, 1920, the following were designated as representatives of that institute, on the American Engineering Council:

Herbert C. Hoover, J. Parke Channing, Arthur S. Dwight, Edwin Ludlow, Allen H. Rogers, Philip N. Moore, J. V. W. Reynders and Joseph W. Richards.

At its recent regular meetings, the Grand Rapids Engineering Society, of Michigan, accepted the invitation to become a charter member of the Federated Societies; and the advisory council of Iowa Engineering Society made unanimous recommendations that that society also accept.
The council designated J. H. Dunlap as its representative to the meeting of American Engineering Council in Washington, D. C., Nov. 18, 19 and 20.

The American Society of Civil Engineers’ referendum on the question recently decided by 3,800, to 2,300, to refrain from becoming a charter member of the Federated American Engineering Societies.

Already seventeen organizations have definitely accepted charter memberships and more than forty-five representatives are entitled to seats on American Engineering Council.
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Utah Chapter of A. A. E. hears C. J. Ullrich at Annual Banquet
About two hundred engineers of Salt Lake, and other Utah cities, attended the annual banquet of the Utah Chapter of the American Association of Engineers in Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 17.

W. A. Richmond, president of the Utah Chapter, was master of ceremonies and introduced C. J. Ullrich, assistant state engineer, who spoke on the growth of the American Association of Engineers, from its first meeting in 1915, until today, when it has a membership of 21,000. It is dedicated, he said, to service- service of the engineering profession, of the community, and of the nation. Its purpose is unity.
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EMJ 11 20 1920 DORSEY LYON SHORT BIO
November 20, 1920  ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL 997

  DORSEY A LYON

DORSEY A LYON
Metallurgists of Note
             
By Paul Wooton

DORSEY A. LYON, supervisor of the experiment stations of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, is said to know more mining and metallurgical men than any other individual in the United States. Throughout his entire career his duties have required travel between mining centers. The cumulative results are that literally thousands of men engaged in the mining industry have a personal acquaintance with Mr. Lyon.

Practically his entire life has been spent in the Far West. He was thirty years old when he made his first trip east of Chicago. Mr. Lyon was born in Bureau County, Ill., in 1871. His early years were spent in western Kansas, where his parents moved soon after he was born. In this frontier environment he was reared. He received his entire elementary education from his mother.

Later the family moved to Texas, and then to New Mexico. Young Lyon studied at Drury College, in Springfield, Mo., and later at Stanford University, from which he was graduated in 1898. During his senior year he was student-instructor in chemistry.

Following his graduation Mr. Lyon accepted a position as instructor in the geology of mining at the University of Washington.  Later, when the school of mines was with that institution, he was its first dean, being succeeded by Milnor Roberts, the present dean.

Mr. Lyon then took post-graduate work at Harvard University, where he obtained his master’s degree in metallurgy in 1902. Immediately thereafter he accepted employment with the U. S. Mining & Smelting Co. in Utah, which was building its plant at Midvale- then called Bingham Junction.

At this plant his first practical experience was in what Mr. Lyon terms “muscular metallurgy.” He assisted with the construction of the plant and later was placed in charge of the feed floor.

To fill an urgent vacancy at the staff of Stanford University, Mr. Lyon was borrowed until an instructor could be found. His stay proved longer than he had intended, lasting from 1903 to 1908.  During the summers of 1905 and 1906 he conducted large-scale experiments with the electric furnace in connection with the smelting of copper ores.

Later he began work with the electric furnace in the treatment of iron ores. He was in charge of extensive work of this character from 1907 to 1911. In the latter year he went abroad to study the use being made of the electric furnace in Sweden.

On his return, he spent some time in the Harvard laboratory studying the possibilities of reducing iron ore by oil. It happened that Mr. Lyon was doing his electric furnace work at the same time that Dr. F. C. Cottrell was developing his electrical precipitator.

Each was as much interested in the work of the other and they frequently collaborated in efforts to work out certain of the problems which they were meeting. When the Bureau of Mines was established, Dr. Holmes had Mr. Lyon slated as the Bureau’s metallurgist.

It happened just at that time that Mr. Lyon was working under contract for an English company, but at the expiration of this contract in March, 1912, he accepted a detail from the Bureau on some metallurgical experiments, which he conducted at the Harvard laboratory.

On July 1, 1913, he received a Presidential appointment as metallurgist in charge of the Bureau’s electric-furnace work. In 1914 the Bureau of Mines undertook its first cooperative work. An agreement for metallurgical research was made with the University of Utah. One of the conditions of the agreement was that the investigations be supervised by a metallurgist of the Bureau of Mines.

This work, which paved the way for the extensive co-operative investigations being directed by the Bureau, occupied most of Mr. Lyon’s attention until 1917, when he was made superintendent of the Seattle Experiment Station. Later he became supervisor of the experiment stations, the position which he still retains.

Mr. Lyon, besides being a co-author of several bulletins of the Bureau of Mines dealing with the use of the electric furnace in metallurgical work, has written from time to time for various technical publications. He is a member of the A. I. M. E., the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, the British Iron and Steel Institute, the Cosmos Club, and other societies.
EMJ 12 11 1920 MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW
1140 ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL Vol. 110, No.24
December 11 1920

MEN YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

Representative Marion E. Rhodes of Potosi, Mo., has been selected as chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining.
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H. R. Bobbins has been visiting iron-ore dressing plants in Minnesota, Ontario, and Pennsylvania.
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J. M. Libbey, manager of the Arizona United Mining Co., has gone to Mexico to examine mining property.
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Capt. C. G. Collins has been examining the C. Amory Stevens ferro-manganese property at Silver City, N. M.
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M. W. von Bernewitz has rejoined W. H. Weed in compiling Vol. 15, of “The Mines Handbook,” at Tuckahoe, N.Y.
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A. R. Gordon, manager of the New York & Honduras-Rosario Mining Co., San Juancito, Honduras, is in New York City.
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Col. John C. Greenway, of the Calumet & Arizona, is inspecting recent developments at the 85 Mine, at Lordsburg, N. M.
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H. Foster Bain, mining engineer, landed in San Francisco, Cal., on Nov. 27, and was expected to reach Washington, D. C., early in December.
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James W. Sweat, mining engineer of the State of Coahuila, Mexico, is surveying new claims in the San Dimas district, for E. H. Townsend.
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Errol MacBoyle, mining engineer, of San Francisco, Cal., went to Mexico early in November. He will examine a number of mining properties.
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Robert Linton, president of North Butte Mining Co., who has been in Butte, Mont., looking over the properties of the company, has returned to the East.
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Alfredo Frey, mining engineer, formerly of Mapimi, Mexico, has moved with his family to San Juan de Guadelupe. He is operating mines in the Reyes district.
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Henry Hinds, petroleum geologist, formerly with the Geological Survey, and more recently, with the Sinclair Oil Co., is now with the Pantoteck Oil Co. of New York City.
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G. F. Loughlin, head of the division of Mineral Resources of the U. S. Geological Survey, has completed a reconnaissance of the recent development in the Tintic district of Utah.
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Andrew White Newberry, mining engineer, of New York City, is on a brief visit to his home, prior to an early departure for Nicaragua, where he will examine some mining properties.
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Enoch Henderson, superintendent of the Franklin Mining Co., has returned to Houghton, Mich., from Detroit, where he was temporarily connected with the Rockwood Silica Sand Co.
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Rush T. and Harley A. Sill, mining engineers of Los Angeles, Cal., have gone to Arizona and Mexico to examine several properties. They expect to return to Los Angeles about Jan. 1.
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F. W. Sperr, professor of mining engineering, Michigan College of Mines; has been selected as chairman of the recently formed informal organization of Copper Country mining engineers.
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Lyman F. Barber, recently of Prescott, Ariz., is now in charge of the construction of the C. O. D. Mining Co.’s new mill at Kingman, Ariz., where he should be addressed, care of P. O. Box 173.
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C. B. Holmes, formerly chief auditor for the War Mineral Relief Commission, has formed the firm of C. B. Holmes & Co., consulting mine, mill, and smelter accountants. His office is 434 Continental Trust Building, Washington, D. C.
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Bradley Stoughton, of New York City, spent Nov. 28, 29, and 30 in Houghton, Mich., where he addressed a meeting of mining engineers at the Houghton Club. L. D. Cooper, of Minneapolis, Minn., accompanied Mr. Stoughton.
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A. W. Tucker, consulting mining engineer, of Salisbury, N. C., has completed his work with the Bureau of Mines, in connection with the War Minerals Relief claims, and is resuming private practice in matters relative to mineral deposits of the Southern Appalachians.
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J. C. Hartness, formerly superintendent for the Bowe-Burke Mining Co., has resigned his position, and will open an office in Eveleth, Minn., as a consulting engineer. For the last two years, Mr. Hartness has had charge of the Burns, Moriska, and Morrow mines for the Bowe-Burke company.
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Arthur Howe Carpenter, formerly of Denver, who was, for some years, assistant research chemist for the American Vanadium Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., and more recently, metallurgist for the Colorado Vanadium Corporation, Sawpit, Col., has accepted a position as professor of metallurgy, at the Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago, Ill.
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Fritz J. Frank, vice-president of Iron Age Publishing Co., has been elected its president, following William H. Taylor, president and general manager for more than ten years, who is resigning because of ill-health.

William H. Taylor came to Iron Age as general manager, when it was sold by David Williams.  Mr. Taylor already had fifteen years experience with trade and engineering publications.

For a time he was vice-president of the McGraw Publishing Co., and, later, president of the Taylor Publishing Co., of Chicago, which consolidated The Engineer and Steam Engineering. He and his associates, on acquiring Iron Age, elevated the hardware department of that journal into Hardware Age.

Fritz J. Frank, who succeeds Mr. Taylor, has been with the Iron Age Publishing Co. since 1910, after an active association with other trade publications, including Colliery Engineer, and Mining & Scientific Press.
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SOCIETY MEETINGS
The Society of Economic Geologists holds its first annual meeting at Chicago, IL, Dec. 28 to 30, 1920, in conjunction with the meeting of the Geological Society of America. Society headquarters and a registration book will be at Rosenwald Hall, University of Chicago.
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OBITUARY

EmiIio Stalknecht, mining engineer, of Parral, Mexico, and widely known throughout northern Mexico, died there, the third week in November. Mr. Stalknecht had held important positions with various mining companies in Mexico, but met with a serious mine accident several years ago, injuring his health, and eventually causing his death.
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Regis Chauvenet, mining engineer and president emeritus of Colorado State School of Mines, died on Dec. 5, at Denver, Col., in his seventy-ninth year. Professor Chauvenet, who was born at Philadelphia, Oct. 7, 1842, graduated with the B.S. degree from Harvard in 1867; became chemist to the Missouri Geological Survey, in 1872, and took the chair of chemistry and metallurgy at the Colorado School of Mines, in 1883. From 1883 to 1902, he also served that school as its president, resigning in the latter year to resume private practice as mining engineer. In 1911, he published his volume “Chemical and Metallurgical Calculations.”
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While engaged in geologic work in northwestern India for S. Pearson & Son, of London, Ralph W. Howell, formerly with the Land Classification Board of U. S. Geological Survey, was killed by savages in the Baluchistan-Punjab district.
The British authorities have offered a reward of $5,000 for the arrest of those responsible for Mr. Howell’s death.
Mr. Howell served with the Geological Survey from 1913 to 1919. In October 1919, he had been granted a leave of absence to accept a position offered him by the British oil concern, and had worked for them with D. Dale Condit, oil geologist, in British North Borneo, early in the present year.
Mr. Howell was a native of Washington, D. C., and the only son of the late Edwin E. Howell, a naturalist and geologist distinguished for his geologic relief maps of the chief physical features of the United States.

Young Howell was a past student of Columbian College ( George Washington University), at Washington, and was only thirty-four years old at the time of his death.
It is understood that D. Dale Condit, chief of Mr. Howell’s party at the time of the attack, has escaped to safety.
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